AN EXPLORATION OF PROFESSIONAL NURSES' VALUES AT A FREESTANDING CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157503
Type:
Presentation
Title:
AN EXPLORATION OF PROFESSIONAL NURSES' VALUES AT A FREESTANDING CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL
Abstract:
AN EXPLORATION OF PROFESSIONAL NURSES' VALUES AT A FREESTANDING CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Gallegos, Cara, RN, MSN, PdD, (c)
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin- Eau Claire
Title:Assitant Professor
Contact Address:611 St. Joseph Avenue, Marshfield, WI, 54449, USA
Co-Authors:Susan Newton
BACKGROUND: The Code for Nurses, developed by the Amereican Nurses Association (ANA), is a "gold standard" of professional values for Registered Nurses (RNs), encompassing such values as dignity and respect, safeguarding of privacy, responsibility, patient safety, accountability, competence, and collaboration (ANA, 2001; ANA, 2008). Professional values form the basis for nurse attitudes and behavior, and are a cornerstone to guiding nurses' clinical practice decisions (Weis & Schank, 2002). Despite recent research that points to the importance of developing and measuring professional nursing values, few researchers have examined the professional nursing values of Registered Nurses in the workforce and none have specifically examined professional values of RNs in the pediatric setting.

AIMS: The study is a descriptive study of nurses' professional values at a large freestanding children's hospital that seeks to address the following questions: (1) What are the professional values of employed Registered Nurses? (2) Are there differences in professional values of Registered Nurses based on demographic variables?
Conceptual Framework. This study is based on theoretical framework outlined in Benner's (1984) work. Benner (1984) differentiates among five stages of a nurse's clinical career development: novice, advanced beginner, competent, proficient, and expert. In order for a nurse to move from novice to expert, they must develop skills in the affective domain, as well as cognitive and psychomotor skills (Weis and Schank, 2000). Weis and Schank (2002) assert that incomplete value embodiment may be one reason why nurses progress from novice to expert level at differing rates, and some nurses do not master nursing practice at all.

METHODS:
Sample: A convenience sample of all RNs were invited to participate.
Instrument: The NursesÆ Professional Values Scale - Revised (NPRVS-R) (2004). NPVS-R is a useful instrument for measuring professional nursing values and enhancing professional socialization. The NPVS-R, a 37-item, norm referenced instrument using a Likert-scale format that was developed by Weis and Schank (2004). The NPVS-R was tested on 632 subjects, including baccalaureate and masters' students and practicing nurses. The demographic questions in the original survey were replaced with additional demographic variables, such as age, gender, race/ethnicity, educational preparation, length of time as Registered Nurse, hours worked, job type, hospital unit/area worked, and so forth.
Data Collection: The survey, consisting of 11 questions, was administered through a confidential online survey system. The questionnaire was available for four weeks and reminders to complete the survey were sent out bi-weekly.
Data Analysis: Preliminary data analysis demonstrates that nurses' professional values are significantly different based upon education, age, and clinical area worked.

IMPLICATIONS: This study is one of the first to provide a description of professional values of Registered Nurses at a large freestanding children's hospital. Implications for future research include performing longitudinal studies to examine whether nursing values change over time, and if so, how do they change. It is also important to examine whether professional development programs can positively impact nurses professional values.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAN EXPLORATION OF PROFESSIONAL NURSES' VALUES AT A FREESTANDING CHILDREN'S HOSPITALen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157503-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">AN EXPLORATION OF PROFESSIONAL NURSES' VALUES AT A FREESTANDING CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Gallegos, Cara, RN, MSN, PdD, (c)</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin- Eau Claire</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assitant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">611 St. Joseph Avenue, Marshfield, WI, 54449, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">gallegcm@uwec.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Susan Newton</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">BACKGROUND: The Code for Nurses, developed by the Amereican Nurses Association (ANA), is a &quot;gold standard&quot; of professional values for Registered Nurses (RNs), encompassing such values as dignity and respect, safeguarding of privacy, responsibility, patient safety, accountability, competence, and collaboration (ANA, 2001; ANA, 2008). Professional values form the basis for nurse attitudes and behavior, and are a cornerstone to guiding nurses' clinical practice decisions (Weis &amp; Schank, 2002). Despite recent research that points to the importance of developing and measuring professional nursing values, few researchers have examined the professional nursing values of Registered Nurses in the workforce and none have specifically examined professional values of RNs in the pediatric setting. <br/><br/>AIMS: The study is a descriptive study of nurses' professional values at a large freestanding children's hospital that seeks to address the following questions: (1) What are the professional values of employed Registered Nurses? (2) Are there differences in professional values of Registered Nurses based on demographic variables?<br/>Conceptual Framework. This study is based on theoretical framework outlined in Benner's (1984) work. Benner (1984) differentiates among five stages of a nurse's clinical career development: novice, advanced beginner, competent, proficient, and expert. In order for a nurse to move from novice to expert, they must develop skills in the affective domain, as well as cognitive and psychomotor skills (Weis and Schank, 2000). Weis and Schank (2002) assert that incomplete value embodiment may be one reason why nurses progress from novice to expert level at differing rates, and some nurses do not master nursing practice at all. <br/><br/>METHODS: <br/>Sample: A convenience sample of all RNs were invited to participate. <br/>Instrument: The Nurses&AElig; Professional Values Scale - Revised (NPRVS-R) (2004). NPVS-R is a useful instrument for measuring professional nursing values and enhancing professional socialization. The NPVS-R, a 37-item, norm referenced instrument using a Likert-scale format that was developed by Weis and Schank (2004). The NPVS-R was tested on 632 subjects, including baccalaureate and masters' students and practicing nurses. The demographic questions in the original survey were replaced with additional demographic variables, such as age, gender, race/ethnicity, educational preparation, length of time as Registered Nurse, hours worked, job type, hospital unit/area worked, and so forth. <br/>Data Collection: The survey, consisting of 11 questions, was administered through a confidential online survey system. The questionnaire was available for four weeks and reminders to complete the survey were sent out bi-weekly. <br/>Data Analysis: Preliminary data analysis demonstrates that nurses' professional values are significantly different based upon education, age, and clinical area worked. <br/><br/>IMPLICATIONS: This study is one of the first to provide a description of professional values of Registered Nurses at a large freestanding children's hospital. Implications for future research include performing longitudinal studies to examine whether nursing values change over time, and if so, how do they change. It is also important to examine whether professional development programs can positively impact nurses professional values.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:55:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:55:55Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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