2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157506
Type:
Presentation
Title:
OBESITY PREVENTION INTERVENTION FOR MIDDLE SCHOOL YOUTH
Abstract:
OBESITY PREVENTION INTERVENTION FOR MIDDLE SCHOOL YOUTH
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Gance-Cleveland, Bonnie, PhD, RNC, PNP, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:Arizona State University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:500 N. 3rd Street, Phoenix, AZ, 85004-0698, USA
Co-Authors:Myunghan Choi; Fermin Renteria; Wendy Wardbegnoche
BACKGROUND: The number of overweight children continues to climb. Overweight youth are more likely to develop diabetes, hypertension, respiratory problems and obesity as adults at risk of dying 5 - 20 years sooner than normal weight persons. Research suggests obese children and their parents felt the child's quality of life was similar to pediatric cancer patients. Arkansas' Legislature responded to the obesity epidemic by mandating annual BMIs, limiting access to food / beverage machines; reporting moneys received through food and beverage contracts; convening local advisory committees for nutrition and physical activity; and incorporating nutrition and physical activity goals into annual school plans. Our research team partnered with the community to address the mandate. A nine-week exercise, nutrition and behavior change curriculum was implemented and evaluated.
OBJECTIVE: To assess the intervention effect of diet, physical activity, smoking habits and attitudes, and social/behavioral support over time among school children adolescents.
METHODS: The community-based participatory method was selected to: identify components of the intervention acceptable to the community, promote sustainable change, improve recruitment for better evaluation, improve sustainability and spread of the program. A repeated measures design was used to measure effectiveness of the intervention on BMI, activity, nutrition, and social support. ANOVA was used to determine the overall effect of each dependent variable by 3 time measurements (pre, post, and 2-year follow up) not controlling gender, ethnicity, or age. A total of 511 convenient sample (N = 231 for pre test, N = 222 for post test, and N = 58 for follow up) was selected for the study. Homogeneous subsets were calculated to avoid type I error. Because groups are of unequal sample size, Welch's variance-weighted ANOVA was conducted. Post-hoc test using Scheffe test was conducted to determine group differences. All data analyses were conducted using SPSS (version 17).
RESULTS: Diet intention (F = 9.7, p <.01), diet knowledge (F = 8.2, p < .01), physical activity with friends and family (F = 7.2, p < .01), and physical activity in the past 7 days (F = 17.0, p < .01) were significantly improved overtime. Time spending for TV/video game race (F = 8.6, p < .01) and smoking habits (F = 5.6, p < .01) were significantly reduced over time. Family reward and punishment (F = 14.3, p < .01), friend participation (F = 4.3, p < .05), and friend reward punishment (F = 7.4, p < .01) were only significant between pre and post intervention. However, there were not significant improvements in BMI. Homogeneous test demonstrated that there was no difference in group variances.
CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest the intervention had an impact on behaviors but not BMI in middle school children.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOBESITY PREVENTION INTERVENTION FOR MIDDLE SCHOOL YOUTHen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157506-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">OBESITY PREVENTION INTERVENTION FOR MIDDLE SCHOOL YOUTH</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Gance-Cleveland, Bonnie, PhD, RNC, PNP, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arizona State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">500 N. 3rd Street, Phoenix, AZ, 85004-0698, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Bonnie.Gance-Cleveland@asu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Myunghan Choi; Fermin Renteria; Wendy Wardbegnoche</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">BACKGROUND: The number of overweight children continues to climb. Overweight youth are more likely to develop diabetes, hypertension, respiratory problems and obesity as adults at risk of dying 5 - 20 years sooner than normal weight persons. Research suggests obese children and their parents felt the child's quality of life was similar to pediatric cancer patients. Arkansas' Legislature responded to the obesity epidemic by mandating annual BMIs, limiting access to food / beverage machines; reporting moneys received through food and beverage contracts; convening local advisory committees for nutrition and physical activity; and incorporating nutrition and physical activity goals into annual school plans. Our research team partnered with the community to address the mandate. A nine-week exercise, nutrition and behavior change curriculum was implemented and evaluated. <br/>OBJECTIVE: To assess the intervention effect of diet, physical activity, smoking habits and attitudes, and social/behavioral support over time among school children adolescents. <br/>METHODS: The community-based participatory method was selected to: identify components of the intervention acceptable to the community, promote sustainable change, improve recruitment for better evaluation, improve sustainability and spread of the program. A repeated measures design was used to measure effectiveness of the intervention on BMI, activity, nutrition, and social support. ANOVA was used to determine the overall effect of each dependent variable by 3 time measurements (pre, post, and 2-year follow up) not controlling gender, ethnicity, or age. A total of 511 convenient sample (N = 231 for pre test, N = 222 for post test, and N = 58 for follow up) was selected for the study. Homogeneous subsets were calculated to avoid type I error. Because groups are of unequal sample size, Welch's variance-weighted ANOVA was conducted. Post-hoc test using Scheffe test was conducted to determine group differences. All data analyses were conducted using SPSS (version 17). <br/>RESULTS: Diet intention (F = 9.7, p &lt;.01), diet knowledge (F = 8.2, p &lt; .01), physical activity with friends and family (F = 7.2, p &lt; .01), and physical activity in the past 7 days (F = 17.0, p &lt; .01) were significantly improved overtime. Time spending for TV/video game race (F = 8.6, p &lt; .01) and smoking habits (F = 5.6, p &lt; .01) were significantly reduced over time. Family reward and punishment (F = 14.3, p &lt; .01), friend participation (F = 4.3, p &lt; .05), and friend reward punishment (F = 7.4, p &lt; .01) were only significant between pre and post intervention. However, there were not significant improvements in BMI. Homogeneous test demonstrated that there was no difference in group variances. <br/>CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest the intervention had an impact on behaviors but not BMI in middle school children.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:56:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:56:05Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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