MEMORY, HEALTH LITERACY AND THE RECALL OF THE WARNING SIGNS OF STROKE AMONG OLDER ADULTS

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157507
Type:
Presentation
Title:
MEMORY, HEALTH LITERACY AND THE RECALL OF THE WARNING SIGNS OF STROKE AMONG OLDER ADULTS
Abstract:
MEMORY, HEALTH LITERACY AND THE RECALL OF THE WARNING SIGNS OF STROKE AMONG OLDER ADULTS
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Ganzer, Christine, RN, PhD.
P.I. Institution Name:University of Arizona
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:1305 N Martin, Tucson, AZ, 85721, USA
PURPOSE: The purpose of this research study was to investigate the association between working memory capacity, health literacy, and recall of the warning signs of stroke among community dwelling older adults.
BACKGROUND: Older adults constitute a growing population in the United States. A disproportionate percentage of this population experience chronic illnesses that are risk factors for ischemic stroke. An important consideration in preventing the damaging effects of this condition is recall of the warning signs of stroke. Examining the factors that may influence recall may be critical to understanding why there is a delay in seeking treatment. Research supports that older adults experience capacity limitations in working memory. Additionally older adults may experience low health literacy that may further influence the recall of health information.
METHODS: Fifty-six community dwelling older adults (age equal to or greater than 65 years) were recruited for participation in this study. Participants were screened for depression using the Short Form of the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) and dementia using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). Potential participants, who scored > 5 on the GDS or < 24 on the MMSE, were excluded. Near-sighted vision was assured by checking for vision of at minimum 20/50 on the Rosenbaum vision screen. Demographic data was collected. Working memory was measured using the Working Memory Index: Mental Arithmetic-Digit Span-Letter-Number Sequencing triad from the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III. Health literacy was assessed using the Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (STOFHLA). To test recall subjects read a standard information sheet published by the American Stroke Association listing the five warning signs of stroke and were tested for recall after completing the other measures. A descriptive design was used to examine the relationships among study variables. Univariate, bivariate and multiple regression analysis were used to examine the relationships among the key variables, working memory capacity, health literacy and recall.
RESULTS: The mean age of the sample was 80.4 years with a range of 68-99. Participants had a mean educational attainment of 14.2 years with a range of 8 to 22. Recall of the warning signs of stroke was associated with health literacy (r = .44, p <.01). Working memory was also associated with recall (r= .38, p < .01). Interestingly, there was no significant interaction between health literacy and working memory on the recall of the warning signs of stroke.
IMPLICATIONS: This study provides evidence for the critical role of health literacy in the recall of the five warning signs of stroke in a sample of community dwelling older adults. Further investigation is needed to better understand the role of working memory and its relationship to recall of health messages in this population.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMEMORY, HEALTH LITERACY AND THE RECALL OF THE WARNING SIGNS OF STROKE AMONG OLDER ADULTSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157507-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">MEMORY, HEALTH LITERACY AND THE RECALL OF THE WARNING SIGNS OF STROKE AMONG OLDER ADULTS</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ganzer, Christine, RN, PhD.</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Arizona</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1305 N Martin, Tucson, AZ, 85721, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cganzer@nursing.arizona.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE: The purpose of this research study was to investigate the association between working memory capacity, health literacy, and recall of the warning signs of stroke among community dwelling older adults. <br/>BACKGROUND: Older adults constitute a growing population in the United States. A disproportionate percentage of this population experience chronic illnesses that are risk factors for ischemic stroke. An important consideration in preventing the damaging effects of this condition is recall of the warning signs of stroke. Examining the factors that may influence recall may be critical to understanding why there is a delay in seeking treatment. Research supports that older adults experience capacity limitations in working memory. Additionally older adults may experience low health literacy that may further influence the recall of health information. <br/>METHODS: Fifty-six community dwelling older adults (age equal to or greater than 65 years) were recruited for participation in this study. Participants were screened for depression using the Short Form of the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) and dementia using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). Potential participants, who scored &gt; 5 on the GDS or &lt; 24 on the MMSE, were excluded. Near-sighted vision was assured by checking for vision of at minimum 20/50 on the Rosenbaum vision screen. Demographic data was collected. Working memory was measured using the Working Memory Index: Mental Arithmetic-Digit Span-Letter-Number Sequencing triad from the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III. Health literacy was assessed using the Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (STOFHLA). To test recall subjects read a standard information sheet published by the American Stroke Association listing the five warning signs of stroke and were tested for recall after completing the other measures. A descriptive design was used to examine the relationships among study variables. Univariate, bivariate and multiple regression analysis were used to examine the relationships among the key variables, working memory capacity, health literacy and recall. <br/>RESULTS: The mean age of the sample was 80.4 years with a range of 68-99. Participants had a mean educational attainment of 14.2 years with a range of 8 to 22. Recall of the warning signs of stroke was associated with health literacy (r = .44, p &lt;.01). Working memory was also associated with recall (r= .38, p &lt; .01). Interestingly, there was no significant interaction between health literacy and working memory on the recall of the warning signs of stroke. <br/>IMPLICATIONS: This study provides evidence for the critical role of health literacy in the recall of the five warning signs of stroke in a sample of community dwelling older adults. Further investigation is needed to better understand the role of working memory and its relationship to recall of health messages in this population.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:56:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:56:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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