2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157509
Type:
Presentation
Title:
FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS VACCINATION IN COLLEGE-AGED WOMEN
Abstract:
FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS VACCINATION IN COLLEGE-AGED WOMEN
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Gerardi, Margit B., PhD, RN, WHNP
P.I. Institution Name:UTHSCSA
Title:Dr.
Contact Address:7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, TX, 78229-3900, USA
Co-Authors:Diana Beckmann-Mendez
PURPOSE: It is suspected that minority women who have taken the first HPV vaccine series may not complete the 3-series vaccination at the same rate as their non-Hispanic Caucasian counterparts. Aims: Assess the prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases and sexual high-risk behaviors in young adult women seeking routine health care services in an outpatient setting. Describe the demographic characteristics and intention variables of patients who adhered and completed the HPV vaccination series.
BACKGROUND:
More than 40 strains of human papillomavirus (HPV) transmitted directly from sexual activity. Fourteen are associated with over 99% of cervical cancers and high grade cervical precancerous lesions. The incidence of cervical cancer ranks among the top five types of cancers found in African-American and Hispanic women in the United States. HPV related cervical cancer is a disease that disproportionately affects Hispanics as US rates are approximately 50% higher among Hispanic women than among non-Hispanic Caucasian women.
METHODS:
A survey with descriptive methods approach is being used to explore variables related to HPV vaccination in primary care settings in a large southwestern city in this pilot study (n=100). Open-ended questions (including critical incident) are included in the survey instrument to allow participants to describe experiences or behaviors that affected their decisions to share or garner information related to sexual experiences and HPV vaccination. The convenience sample is 100 young adult females who receive services in a primary care clinic and was selected based on documented ethnicity rates at the clinic site and power analyses conducted for difference tests ranging from a one-sample t test through a one way analysis of variance (ANOVA).

RESULTS: Vaccination rates varied by religious self-affiliation. Rates of vaccination by religious identification were 20% for Protestant, 25.8% for Catholic, 27.3% for Other (Ex: Buddhist), and 100% for Jewish women (3, N=98, x2=11.42, p=<.01). Rates of vaccination also varied by relationship status with married students reporting the lowest rates of vaccination (5.3%) versus those in committed but not married relationships (50%) (4, N=99, x2=13.22, p=<.01). Oral contraceptive users were more likely to get vaccinated against HPV than users of other types of contraception (4, N=99, x2=4.874, p=<.05). Lastly, a trend in data was seen as Caucasian non-Hispanic women were found to have decreased vaccination rates in comparison to other race/ethnicity classification examined in this pilot project.
IMPLICATIONS:
With the advent of a vaccine series that has a significant impact on the reduction of HPV related cervical dysplasia and oncogenic sequela, great strides in decreasing cervical cancer can potentially arise in this next decade. Despite the potential positive health outcomes of the vaccine, there is a growing body of literature to support that those who are at increased risk for HPV infection are less likely to receive the vaccine. Continued research regarding vaccination could inform nurse practitioner interventions toward significant health promotion and disease prevention strategies especially in minority groups facing marked health disparities in this country.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS VACCINATION IN COLLEGE-AGED WOMENen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157509-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS VACCINATION IN COLLEGE-AGED WOMEN</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Gerardi, Margit B., PhD, RN, WHNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">UTHSCSA</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Dr.</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, TX, 78229-3900, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">gerardi@uthscsa.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Diana Beckmann-Mendez</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE: It is suspected that minority women who have taken the first HPV vaccine series may not complete the 3-series vaccination at the same rate as their non-Hispanic Caucasian counterparts. Aims: Assess the prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases and sexual high-risk behaviors in young adult women seeking routine health care services in an outpatient setting. Describe the demographic characteristics and intention variables of patients who adhered and completed the HPV vaccination series. <br/>BACKGROUND:<br/> More than 40 strains of human papillomavirus (HPV) transmitted directly from sexual activity. Fourteen are associated with over 99% of cervical cancers and high grade cervical precancerous lesions. The incidence of cervical cancer ranks among the top five types of cancers found in African-American and Hispanic women in the United States. HPV related cervical cancer is a disease that disproportionately affects Hispanics as US rates are approximately 50% higher among Hispanic women than among non-Hispanic Caucasian women. <br/>METHODS: <br/> A survey with descriptive methods approach is being used to explore variables related to HPV vaccination in primary care settings in a large southwestern city in this pilot study (n=100). Open-ended questions (including critical incident) are included in the survey instrument to allow participants to describe experiences or behaviors that affected their decisions to share or garner information related to sexual experiences and HPV vaccination. The convenience sample is 100 young adult females who receive services in a primary care clinic and was selected based on documented ethnicity rates at the clinic site and power analyses conducted for difference tests ranging from a one-sample t test through a one way analysis of variance (ANOVA).<br/><br/>RESULTS: Vaccination rates varied by religious self-affiliation. Rates of vaccination by religious identification were 20% for Protestant, 25.8% for Catholic, 27.3% for Other (Ex: Buddhist), and 100% for Jewish women (3, N=98, x2=11.42, p=&lt;.01). Rates of vaccination also varied by relationship status with married students reporting the lowest rates of vaccination (5.3%) versus those in committed but not married relationships (50%) (4, N=99, x2=13.22, p=&lt;.01). Oral contraceptive users were more likely to get vaccinated against HPV than users of other types of contraception (4, N=99, x2=4.874, p=&lt;.05). Lastly, a trend in data was seen as Caucasian non-Hispanic women were found to have decreased vaccination rates in comparison to other race/ethnicity classification examined in this pilot project. <br/>IMPLICATIONS: <br/> With the advent of a vaccine series that has a significant impact on the reduction of HPV related cervical dysplasia and oncogenic sequela, great strides in decreasing cervical cancer can potentially arise in this next decade. Despite the potential positive health outcomes of the vaccine, there is a growing body of literature to support that those who are at increased risk for HPV infection are less likely to receive the vaccine. Continued research regarding vaccination could inform nurse practitioner interventions toward significant health promotion and disease prevention strategies especially in minority groups facing marked health disparities in this country. <br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:56:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:56:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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