2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157512
Type:
Presentation
Title:
LATINO YOUNG MEN AND HEALTH BELIEFS, ACCULTURATION AND EMERGING ADULTHOOD
Abstract:
LATINO YOUNG MEN AND HEALTH BELIEFS, ACCULTURATION AND EMERGING ADULTHOOD
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Guarnero, Peter Andrew, PhD, MN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
Title:Assistant Professor of Nursing
Contact Address:7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, NM, 78229-3900, USA
Co-Authors:Veronica Mendez-Cruz; Christopher Ryan Ramirez
PURPOSE/AIMS: The purpose of the study is to: a) explore and describe relationships among emerging adulthood, acculturation processes, health beliefs and behaviors, and the meaning of health as perceived by a group of young Latino/Hispanic men and b) to generate hypothesis that can be used to develop and test culturally appropriate measurements and intervention strategies to promote and improve the health of young Latino/Hispanic men.
RATIONALE/BACKGROUND: It is important for researchers to determine, for instance, what factors influence 18 to 25 year old Latino/Hispanic men to stay healthy. It is also important to examine the experiences of Latino/Hispanic young men as they negotiate the demands of love and work (including education in many cases) as they develop their mature identity and worldview. Negotiating these facets of emerging adulthood can potentially impact the young man's health status.
METHODS: This pilot study uses a mixed methods triangulation convergence research design. Qualitative and quantitative data is being collected separately, and the RESULTS: will be compared and contrasted, thus allowing validation or corroboration of quantitative data with qualitative findings. The sample consists of Latino/Hispanic young men between the ages of 18 to 25. Recruitment is occurring with the collaboration and assistance of the staff of the University of New Mexico's Centro de la Raza which is a multi-service center that provides a variety of academic and social programs for Latino/Hispanic students. A demographic questionnaire developed by the investigator collects data regarding age, sexual orientation, racial/ethnic identification, HIV status and testicular self-exam. Instruments include the Short Acculturation Scale for Hispanics (Marin et al., 1987) and the Acculturation Rating Scale for Mexican-Americans-II (Cuellar, Arnold & Maldonado, 1995), Health Promotion Lifestyle Profile-II (Walker & Hill-Polerecky, 1996), and the General Health Visual Analog Scale (VAS), Quality of Life VAS, and Self-Rated Health Scale (Lorig et al., 1996). The qualitative piece consists of individual interviews which seek to understand how young Latino/Hispanic men address health promotion, acculturation and emerging adulthood.
RESULTS: Preliminary findings indicate that 18-25 year old Latino/Hispanic men are impacted by several health concerns or issues. Among these are establishing and maintaining healthy relationships, sexual health, use and abuse of alcohol, and the lack of access to healthcare.
IMPLICATIONS: The findings of this study will enhance understanding of how the tasks of emerging adulthood and the processes of acculturation influence or impact health behaviors and beliefs in young Latino/Hispanic men. In the long term, the findings will be an important first step in developing culturally appropriate measures and interventions that can have a positive impact on the health behaviors and beliefs of young Latino/Hispanic men.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLATINO YOUNG MEN AND HEALTH BELIEFS, ACCULTURATION AND EMERGING ADULTHOODen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157512-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">LATINO YOUNG MEN AND HEALTH BELIEFS, ACCULTURATION AND EMERGING ADULTHOOD</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Guarnero, Peter Andrew, PhD, MN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, NM, 78229-3900, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">pguarnero15@comcast.net</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Veronica Mendez-Cruz; Christopher Ryan Ramirez</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE/AIMS: The purpose of the study is to: a) explore and describe relationships among emerging adulthood, acculturation processes, health beliefs and behaviors, and the meaning of health as perceived by a group of young Latino/Hispanic men and b) to generate hypothesis that can be used to develop and test culturally appropriate measurements and intervention strategies to promote and improve the health of young Latino/Hispanic men. <br/>RATIONALE/BACKGROUND: It is important for researchers to determine, for instance, what factors influence 18 to 25 year old Latino/Hispanic men to stay healthy. It is also important to examine the experiences of Latino/Hispanic young men as they negotiate the demands of love and work (including education in many cases) as they develop their mature identity and worldview. Negotiating these facets of emerging adulthood can potentially impact the young man's health status. <br/>METHODS: This pilot study uses a mixed methods triangulation convergence research design. Qualitative and quantitative data is being collected separately, and the RESULTS: will be compared and contrasted, thus allowing validation or corroboration of quantitative data with qualitative findings. The sample consists of Latino/Hispanic young men between the ages of 18 to 25. Recruitment is occurring with the collaboration and assistance of the staff of the University of New Mexico's Centro de la Raza which is a multi-service center that provides a variety of academic and social programs for Latino/Hispanic students. A demographic questionnaire developed by the investigator collects data regarding age, sexual orientation, racial/ethnic identification, HIV status and testicular self-exam. Instruments include the Short Acculturation Scale for Hispanics (Marin et al., 1987) and the Acculturation Rating Scale for Mexican-Americans-II (Cuellar, Arnold &amp; Maldonado, 1995), Health Promotion Lifestyle Profile-II (Walker &amp; Hill-Polerecky, 1996), and the General Health Visual Analog Scale (VAS), Quality of Life VAS, and Self-Rated Health Scale (Lorig et al., 1996). The qualitative piece consists of individual interviews which seek to understand how young Latino/Hispanic men address health promotion, acculturation and emerging adulthood. <br/>RESULTS: Preliminary findings indicate that 18-25 year old Latino/Hispanic men are impacted by several health concerns or issues. Among these are establishing and maintaining healthy relationships, sexual health, use and abuse of alcohol, and the lack of access to healthcare. <br/>IMPLICATIONS: The findings of this study will enhance understanding of how the tasks of emerging adulthood and the processes of acculturation influence or impact health behaviors and beliefs in young Latino/Hispanic men. In the long term, the findings will be an important first step in developing culturally appropriate measures and interventions that can have a positive impact on the health behaviors and beliefs of young Latino/Hispanic men. <br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:56:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:56:25Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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