2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157513
Type:
Presentation
Title:
MANAGING MY PREGNANCY: CHILDBEARING BELIEFS OF WOMEN OF MEXICAN DESCENT
Abstract:
MANAGING MY PREGNANCY: CHILDBEARING BELIEFS OF WOMEN OF MEXICAN DESCENT
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Guerrero, Lorena C., PhD, RN, FNP-BC
P.I. Institution Name:University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
Title:Clinical Instructor
Contact Address:7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, TX, 78229, USA
PURPOSE: The purpose of this grounded theory study was to gain an understanding of the pregnancy-specific health beliefs and practices that pregnant women of Mexican origin engage in and to explore the decision-making process related to the adoption, alteration, or rejection of these beliefs and practices.
BACKGROUND: Hispanics now constitute the largest minority population in the United States. The largest portion of this population is of Mexican ancestry and represents approximately 58% of all Hispanics. Hispanic women incorporate both conventional and biomedical practices with traditional medicine/complementary and alternative medicine in their treatment of illnesses. However, Hispanic women view pregnancy as a natural part of the life cycle that requires little, if any, medical care and intervention. There is limited data on current health beliefs and practices regarding pregnancy for Hispanic women of Mexican ancestry and a paucity of research on the decision making process women use to adopt, alter, or reject these beliefs and practices. Available data are outdated, limited, mostly curative in nature, and often dismissed as benign cultural practices of a mainly homogeneous cultural group.
METHODS: Grounded theory methodology allows for exploration and description of the phenomenon of interest. A total of 15 pregnant and post partum participants with Mexican ancestry were recruited from a community clinic located in the inner city of a large metropolitan area of south Texas. This method yielded a total of 17 interviews which were audio recorded, transcribed, and analyzed by the bilingual investigator. The findings were derived from a constant comparative analysis of the verbatim transcriptions, demographic questionnaires, field notes, open code notes, theoretical notes, diagrams, and operational notes.
RESULTS: A substantive theory, the process by which women insure a healthy pregnancy and infant, emerged from the data. A core category, or basic social process, Managing my Pregnancy, was identified. Managing my Pregnancy is the process that this group of women engaged in as they navigated their pregnancy, learned to care for themselves during their pregnancy, and made decisions regarding which beliefs and health care practices they would choose to implement. Managing my Pregnancy is made up of three stages; Gaining Knowledge, Caring for Myself, and Constant Monitoring. Managing my Pregnancy describes their decision-making process regarding the adoption, alteration, or rejection of these beliefs and practices.
IMPLICATIONS: Managing my Pregnancy describes how these women managed their pregnancy on a day-to-day basis toward the goal of having a healthy pregnancy and newborn infant. Participants had a holistic perspective of how best to accomplish this goal. Women cared for themselves with a variety of self care practices that included only a few traditional Hispanic beliefs and practices. The findings attempt to answer the question regarding which specific ôcultural practicesö may be retained or lost with subsequent pregnancies and in later generations of U.S.-born Hispanic women.
Funded by: Sigma Theta Tau International, Delta Alpha At-Large Chapter
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMANAGING MY PREGNANCY: CHILDBEARING BELIEFS OF WOMEN OF MEXICAN DESCENTen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157513-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">MANAGING MY PREGNANCY: CHILDBEARING BELIEFS OF WOMEN OF MEXICAN DESCENT</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Guerrero, Lorena C., PhD, RN, FNP-BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Instructor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, TX, 78229, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">GuerreroL@uthscsa.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE: The purpose of this grounded theory study was to gain an understanding of the pregnancy-specific health beliefs and practices that pregnant women of Mexican origin engage in and to explore the decision-making process related to the adoption, alteration, or rejection of these beliefs and practices.<br/>BACKGROUND: Hispanics now constitute the largest minority population in the United States. The largest portion of this population is of Mexican ancestry and represents approximately 58% of all Hispanics. Hispanic women incorporate both conventional and biomedical practices with traditional medicine/complementary and alternative medicine in their treatment of illnesses. However, Hispanic women view pregnancy as a natural part of the life cycle that requires little, if any, medical care and intervention. There is limited data on current health beliefs and practices regarding pregnancy for Hispanic women of Mexican ancestry and a paucity of research on the decision making process women use to adopt, alter, or reject these beliefs and practices. Available data are outdated, limited, mostly curative in nature, and often dismissed as benign cultural practices of a mainly homogeneous cultural group. <br/>METHODS: Grounded theory methodology allows for exploration and description of the phenomenon of interest. A total of 15 pregnant and post partum participants with Mexican ancestry were recruited from a community clinic located in the inner city of a large metropolitan area of south Texas. This method yielded a total of 17 interviews which were audio recorded, transcribed, and analyzed by the bilingual investigator. The findings were derived from a constant comparative analysis of the verbatim transcriptions, demographic questionnaires, field notes, open code notes, theoretical notes, diagrams, and operational notes.<br/>RESULTS: A substantive theory, the process by which women insure a healthy pregnancy and infant, emerged from the data. A core category, or basic social process, Managing my Pregnancy, was identified. Managing my Pregnancy is the process that this group of women engaged in as they navigated their pregnancy, learned to care for themselves during their pregnancy, and made decisions regarding which beliefs and health care practices they would choose to implement. Managing my Pregnancy is made up of three stages; Gaining Knowledge, Caring for Myself, and Constant Monitoring. Managing my Pregnancy describes their decision-making process regarding the adoption, alteration, or rejection of these beliefs and practices.<br/>IMPLICATIONS: Managing my Pregnancy describes how these women managed their pregnancy on a day-to-day basis toward the goal of having a healthy pregnancy and newborn infant. Participants had a holistic perspective of how best to accomplish this goal. Women cared for themselves with a variety of self care practices that included only a few traditional Hispanic beliefs and practices. The findings attempt to answer the question regarding which specific &ocirc;cultural practices&ouml; may be retained or lost with subsequent pregnancies and in later generations of U.S.-born Hispanic women.<br/> Funded by: Sigma Theta Tau International, Delta Alpha At-Large Chapter<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:56:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:56:29Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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