2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157517
Type:
Presentation
Title:
PREVALENT SYMPTOMS IN PATIENTS WITH END-STAGE LIVER DISEASE AT THE END OF LIFE
Abstract:
PREVALENT SYMPTOMS IN PATIENTS WITH END-STAGE LIVER DISEASE AT THE END OF LIFE
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Hansen, Lissi, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Oregon Health & Science University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:3455 SW US Veterans Hospital Rd., Portland, OR, 97239, USA
PURPOSE: The purpose of this poster is to present prevalent symptoms in patients with end-stage liver disease (ESLD) at the end of life from patients' and their family members' perspective.
BACKGROUND: An estimated 5.5 million Americans have chronic liver disease or cirrhosis. Chronic liver disease leads to ESLD, which is a life-limiting illness. ESLD is the 12th leading cause of death in the United States, accounting for more than 27,000 deaths annually. Research on patients with ESLD has focused on disease management, treatment of complications, and specific symptoms such as depression, sleep disturbances, fatigue, confusion, and pruritus. No studies have specifically focused on the multiple symptoms patients with ESLD may experience at the end of life and the trajectory of these symptoms. This gap in knowledge is a significant barrier to developing interventions that may improve symptom management at the end of life for patients with ESLD. Because family members' close involvement in the care and management of patients' symptoms at the end of life, the inclusion of their perspective is critical.
METHODS: The Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale (MSAS) is one of several standardized instruments administered in a study using a prospective, longitudinal descriptive design. The instruments are administered once a month for 6 months to a sample of 20 patients and 20 family members. The MSAS assesses characteristics associated with 32 physical (e.g., pain, nausea, feeling bloated) and psychological (e.g., worrying, feeling irritable and/or sad) symptoms potentially experienced by the patient during the past week. Separately the patient and his/her family member are asked whether or not the patient experienced each of the listed symptoms (e.g. pain) during the past week. If the patient experienced a particular symptom, then they are asked to select how often the patient experienced it, how severe it was, and how much it bothered him/her.
RESULTS: Results from 6 months data will be included in the Poster Presentation, April 14 -17, 2010. Descriptive statistics will be reported for the two groups (patients and family members). From the MSAS, the global symptom distress index (GDI), the physical symptom distress (PHYS) and psychological distress (PSYCH) will be reported.
IMPLICATIONS: Gaining knowledge about the prevalent symptoms experienced by patients with ESLD and the trajectory of these symptoms is crucial for designing interventions that optimize quality of life in patients with ESLD at the end of life, and their family members.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePREVALENT SYMPTOMS IN PATIENTS WITH END-STAGE LIVER DISEASE AT THE END OF LIFEen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157517-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">PREVALENT SYMPTOMS IN PATIENTS WITH END-STAGE LIVER DISEASE AT THE END OF LIFE</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hansen, Lissi, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Oregon Health &amp; Science University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">3455 SW US Veterans Hospital Rd., Portland, OR, 97239, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hansenli@ohsu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE: The purpose of this poster is to present prevalent symptoms in patients with end-stage liver disease (ESLD) at the end of life from patients' and their family members' perspective.<br/>BACKGROUND: An estimated 5.5 million Americans have chronic liver disease or cirrhosis. Chronic liver disease leads to ESLD, which is a life-limiting illness. ESLD is the 12th leading cause of death in the United States, accounting for more than 27,000 deaths annually. Research on patients with ESLD has focused on disease management, treatment of complications, and specific symptoms such as depression, sleep disturbances, fatigue, confusion, and pruritus. No studies have specifically focused on the multiple symptoms patients with ESLD may experience at the end of life and the trajectory of these symptoms. This gap in knowledge is a significant barrier to developing interventions that may improve symptom management at the end of life for patients with ESLD. Because family members' close involvement in the care and management of patients' symptoms at the end of life, the inclusion of their perspective is critical. <br/>METHODS: The Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale (MSAS) is one of several standardized instruments administered in a study using a prospective, longitudinal descriptive design. The instruments are administered once a month for 6 months to a sample of 20 patients and 20 family members. The MSAS assesses characteristics associated with 32 physical (e.g., pain, nausea, feeling bloated) and psychological (e.g., worrying, feeling irritable and/or sad) symptoms potentially experienced by the patient during the past week. Separately the patient and his/her family member are asked whether or not the patient experienced each of the listed symptoms (e.g. pain) during the past week. If the patient experienced a particular symptom, then they are asked to select how often the patient experienced it, how severe it was, and how much it bothered him/her. <br/>RESULTS: Results from 6 months data will be included in the Poster Presentation, April 14 -17, 2010. Descriptive statistics will be reported for the two groups (patients and family members). From the MSAS, the global symptom distress index (GDI), the physical symptom distress (PHYS) and psychological distress (PSYCH) will be reported. <br/>IMPLICATIONS: Gaining knowledge about the prevalent symptoms experienced by patients with ESLD and the trajectory of these symptoms is crucial for designing interventions that optimize quality of life in patients with ESLD at the end of life, and their family members.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:56:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:56:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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