USING THE BRIEF PAIN INVENTORY (SHORT FORM) IN A SAMPLE OF SOUTHWESTERN AMERICAN INDIANS

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157518
Type:
Presentation
Title:
USING THE BRIEF PAIN INVENTORY (SHORT FORM) IN A SAMPLE OF SOUTHWESTERN AMERICAN INDIANS
Abstract:
USING THE BRIEF PAIN INVENTORY (SHORT FORM) IN A SAMPLE OF SOUTHWESTERN AMERICAN INDIANS
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Haozous, Emily A., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of New Mexico
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:MSC 09-5350, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 87131-0001, USA
PURPOSE: The mixed methods study was to describe the experience of cancer pain in a group of adult American Indians (AIs) from the southwest United States.
Controlling cancer pain is a challenge for many people with cancer, particularly those diagnosed at later stages of disease. Minorities are more likely than Caucasians to be diagnosed with advanced disease and to be under-medicated for cancer pain. The experience of cancer pain is poorly understood in AIs, in part because few pain assessment instruments have been tested in AI populations.
American Indian informants with cancer were recruited from a regional cancer treatment center in the southwestern United States. During the interview process, pain was assessed using the Brief Pain Inventory (Short Form) (BPI-SF). The BPI-SF is an 11-item questionnaire that assesses pain intensity and degree to which pain interferes with daily life, and has widespread use in diverse populations. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the BPI-SF data. Qualitative data were analyzed using basic descriptive qualitative methodology.
Thirteen AI informants from a variety of southwestern tribes ranging in age from 36 to 76 years and with a variety of tumor types were interviewed. Informants who followed a more traditional AI lifestyle displayed more difficulty in pain description and localization. While pain assessment scores from the BPI-SF were only approximate for many informants, on a zero (no pain) to ten (worst pain) numeric scale, their average worst pain was 5.3, average pain was 4.8, and pain at the time of interview was 3.1. The informants also described the considerable interference pain had on their activities of daily living, demonstrated by mean scores for interference with activity at 3.7, mood at 5, walking at 4.7, and sleep at 4.2. Interference was measured on a zero to ten numeric scale where zero indicated no interference and 10 indicated complete interference. Because the sample had difficulties in utilizing the zero-to-ten pain scale, using the BPI-SF interference sub scale was useful in identifying how pain affected daily life. Measurement of interference pain has on daily life is a useful proxy for symptom distress in a population for which pain is notoriously difficult to assess. Informants described conceptualizing pain in four distinct domains, physical, spiritual, emotional, and mental, and exhibited difficulty in discerning between domains during pain assessment.
Cancer pain assessment using the zero-to-ten scale may prove inaccurate in American Indians from the Southwest because of the difficulty informants demonstrated in using zero to ten scales. Clinician pain assessment which includes discussion of pain interference on daily activities may lend important insight into the degree to which the patient is suffering from physical pain from cancer. Additionally, AI patients who lead more traditional lives may require alternative methods of pain assessment.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUSING THE BRIEF PAIN INVENTORY (SHORT FORM) IN A SAMPLE OF SOUTHWESTERN AMERICAN INDIANSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157518-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">USING THE BRIEF PAIN INVENTORY (SHORT FORM) IN A SAMPLE OF SOUTHWESTERN AMERICAN INDIANS</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Haozous, Emily A., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of New Mexico</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">MSC 09-5350, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 87131-0001, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ehaozous@salud.unm.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE: The mixed methods study was to describe the experience of cancer pain in a group of adult American Indians (AIs) from the southwest United States. <br/>Controlling cancer pain is a challenge for many people with cancer, particularly those diagnosed at later stages of disease. Minorities are more likely than Caucasians to be diagnosed with advanced disease and to be under-medicated for cancer pain. The experience of cancer pain is poorly understood in AIs, in part because few pain assessment instruments have been tested in AI populations. <br/>American Indian informants with cancer were recruited from a regional cancer treatment center in the southwestern United States. During the interview process, pain was assessed using the Brief Pain Inventory (Short Form) (BPI-SF). The BPI-SF is an 11-item questionnaire that assesses pain intensity and degree to which pain interferes with daily life, and has widespread use in diverse populations. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the BPI-SF data. Qualitative data were analyzed using basic descriptive qualitative methodology. <br/>Thirteen AI informants from a variety of southwestern tribes ranging in age from 36 to 76 years and with a variety of tumor types were interviewed. Informants who followed a more traditional AI lifestyle displayed more difficulty in pain description and localization. While pain assessment scores from the BPI-SF were only approximate for many informants, on a zero (no pain) to ten (worst pain) numeric scale, their average worst pain was 5.3, average pain was 4.8, and pain at the time of interview was 3.1. The informants also described the considerable interference pain had on their activities of daily living, demonstrated by mean scores for interference with activity at 3.7, mood at 5, walking at 4.7, and sleep at 4.2. Interference was measured on a zero to ten numeric scale where zero indicated no interference and 10 indicated complete interference. Because the sample had difficulties in utilizing the zero-to-ten pain scale, using the BPI-SF interference sub scale was useful in identifying how pain affected daily life. Measurement of interference pain has on daily life is a useful proxy for symptom distress in a population for which pain is notoriously difficult to assess. Informants described conceptualizing pain in four distinct domains, physical, spiritual, emotional, and mental, and exhibited difficulty in discerning between domains during pain assessment. <br/>Cancer pain assessment using the zero-to-ten scale may prove inaccurate in American Indians from the Southwest because of the difficulty informants demonstrated in using zero to ten scales. Clinician pain assessment which includes discussion of pain interference on daily activities may lend important insight into the degree to which the patient is suffering from physical pain from cancer. Additionally, AI patients who lead more traditional lives may require alternative methods of pain assessment. <br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:56:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:56:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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