2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157519
Type:
Presentation
Title:
THE BALANCE OF WORK AND FAMILY IN THE NURSE EDUCATOR ROLE
Abstract:
THE BALANCE OF WORK AND FAMILY IN THE NURSE EDUCATOR ROLE
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Henry, Melissa L. M., PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Northern Colorado
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Office 3290 Gunter Hall, Campus Box 125, Greeley, CO, 80639, USA
Co-Authors:Lori Brown; Julie Deters; Julie Sampson; Peter Chen
PURPOSE: To explore the relationships of perceived 'fit' between family and educator roles with job satisfaction and burnout in nursing faculty.
BACKGROUND: The shortage of registered nurses in the US is related to an aging workforce, job stress, and an inadequate number of nurse educators to meet the demands to increase nursing student enrollment. Last year over 50,000 qualified nursing student applicants were turned away from nursing programs primarily due to a lack of nursing faculty. The shortage of nurse educators was estimated to be at least 7.6% during the 2008-2009 academic year (AACN, 2009). The shortage of nursing faculty, however, cannot be completely explained by the presence of high paying employment in the private and clinical sector. Dissatisfaction with the job and work environment is increasingly evident as one reason that educators pursue other jobs (Berlin & Sechrist, 2002). Dissatisfied nurse educators relate issues of work pressure, continual change in the work environment, workplace politics, and inadequate compensation with their current role. Although these factors are important to understand sources of job stress for nursing faculty, they are limited to examining environmental factors and do not explore the dynamic relationship between the nurse educator and their work environment. Because nurse educators often balance work and family commitments, it is hypothesized that the perceived 'fit' between their educator and family roles will be negatively related to job dissatisfaction and burnout they experience in their nurse educator role. METHODS: A stratified, random sample of approximately 1200 nursing faculty from universities and community colleges throughout the country were approached via email to participate during spring 2009 semester using web-based Surveymonkey.com software. General demographic and work related information (e.g. tenure, title) were collected. How well faculty perceived their overall 'fit' between their work and family roles was assessed by an 11-item Work and Family Conflict Scale (Carlson, Kacmar, & Williams, 2000). Job dissatisfaction was measured using the 3 item scale by Edwards and Rothbard (1999) and burnout was measured using a modified ShiromûMelamed Burnout Questionnaire.
RESULTS: Three hundred nursing faculty responded to the survey. Data analysis will include descriptive statistics and regression analysis to determine the relationships between work and family 'fit' with job dissatisfaction and burnout.
IMPLICATIONS: This study proposes that the balance of work and family commitments may be related to job dissatisfaction and burnout experienced by nurse faculty. By furthering our understanding of the nature of burnout and job dissatisfaction among nurse educators, academic directors and faculty can develop strategies to improve the working environment for nursing faculty and potentially attract more nurses to the educational role.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTHE BALANCE OF WORK AND FAMILY IN THE NURSE EDUCATOR ROLEen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157519-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">THE BALANCE OF WORK AND FAMILY IN THE NURSE EDUCATOR ROLE</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Henry, Melissa L. M., PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Northern Colorado</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Office 3290 Gunter Hall, Campus Box 125, Greeley, CO, 80639, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">melissa.henry@unco.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Lori Brown; Julie Deters; Julie Sampson; Peter Chen</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE: To explore the relationships of perceived 'fit' between family and educator roles with job satisfaction and burnout in nursing faculty.<br/>BACKGROUND: The shortage of registered nurses in the US is related to an aging workforce, job stress, and an inadequate number of nurse educators to meet the demands to increase nursing student enrollment. Last year over 50,000 qualified nursing student applicants were turned away from nursing programs primarily due to a lack of nursing faculty. The shortage of nurse educators was estimated to be at least 7.6% during the 2008-2009 academic year (AACN, 2009). The shortage of nursing faculty, however, cannot be completely explained by the presence of high paying employment in the private and clinical sector. Dissatisfaction with the job and work environment is increasingly evident as one reason that educators pursue other jobs (Berlin &amp; Sechrist, 2002). Dissatisfied nurse educators relate issues of work pressure, continual change in the work environment, workplace politics, and inadequate compensation with their current role. Although these factors are important to understand sources of job stress for nursing faculty, they are limited to examining environmental factors and do not explore the dynamic relationship between the nurse educator and their work environment. Because nurse educators often balance work and family commitments, it is hypothesized that the perceived 'fit' between their educator and family roles will be negatively related to job dissatisfaction and burnout they experience in their nurse educator role. METHODS: A stratified, random sample of approximately 1200 nursing faculty from universities and community colleges throughout the country were approached via email to participate during spring 2009 semester using web-based Surveymonkey.com software. General demographic and work related information (e.g. tenure, title) were collected. How well faculty perceived their overall 'fit' between their work and family roles was assessed by an 11-item Work and Family Conflict Scale (Carlson, Kacmar, &amp; Williams, 2000). Job dissatisfaction was measured using the 3 item scale by Edwards and Rothbard (1999) and burnout was measured using a modified Shirom&ucirc;Melamed Burnout Questionnaire. <br/>RESULTS: Three hundred nursing faculty responded to the survey. Data analysis will include descriptive statistics and regression analysis to determine the relationships between work and family 'fit' with job dissatisfaction and burnout.<br/>IMPLICATIONS: This study proposes that the balance of work and family commitments may be related to job dissatisfaction and burnout experienced by nurse faculty. By furthering our understanding of the nature of burnout and job dissatisfaction among nurse educators, academic directors and faculty can develop strategies to improve the working environment for nursing faculty and potentially attract more nurses to the educational role. <br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:56:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:56:49Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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