ANALYSIS OF NATIONAL MEDIA COMMENTATORS STATEMENTS ON H1N1 FLU, MEXICO AND THE U.S

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157521
Type:
Presentation
Title:
ANALYSIS OF NATIONAL MEDIA COMMENTATORS STATEMENTS ON H1N1 FLU, MEXICO AND THE U.S
Abstract:
ANALYSIS OF NATIONAL MEDIA COMMENTATORS STATEMENTS ON H1N1 FLU, MEXICO AND THE U.S
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Hill, Brent D., RN, MS
P.I. Institution Name:University of Utah
Title:Ph.D. Student
Contact Address:518 E. Emerson Avenue, Salt Lake City, UT, 84105, USA
PURPOSES/AIMS:
The purpose of this preliminary study is to understand the phenomenon of H1N1 disease transmission blame in American national media commentary, specifically as the commentary expresses a perceived threat to Americans posed by Mexicans and illegal immigrants.
RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND:
Pandemics are complex disease processes that cyclically impact humans. Historically, targeted groups of individuals have been blamed for the origin or spread of the disease. Typically, these scapegoat groups are not the primary cause of the disease, or singularly the agents of transmission, yet members of these groups suffer stigma, isolation and even death when healthcare resources are controlled by policies crafted by dominant social groups. In order to break the cycle of unsubstantiated causative blame, evaluation of public discourse can reduce fear and aggression by substantiating fact and dispelling fiction.
METHODS:
Critical hermeneutics informed by critical social theory provided a conceptual framework and method to explore blame and disease transmission of H1N1. The ultimate purpose of this method is to identify and examine power structures that perpetuate oppression, and initiate a dialogue to inform action and social change. The Anti-Defamation League (ADL) identified national media personalities, Glenn Beck, Michelle Malakin, Michael Savage, Pat Buchanan, and Neal Boortz as publicly linking H1N1 threat to Americans from Mexicans and illegal immigrants. Six texts of comments by these media personalities published by the ADL were coded and analyzed using critical hermeneutic methods. The examination of the texts applied Habermas' process of interpreting social context and historical setting. Historical U.S. immigration policies and disease transmission social dialogues provided context for the analysis of the statements in a hermeneutic circle through which themes were identified.
RESULTS:
Themes identified from media statements were: public health policy as a means for immigration control (not supported by historical or social context); immigration/illegal immigrant potential to overwhelm public health services (not supported by historical or social context); selective isolationism as disease prevention (selectively supported by historical context, not supported by social context); Mexican/Illegal immigrant as disease vector (partially supported by historical and social context); known danger of H1N1 (not supported by historical or social context); costs or repercussions of closing U.S. - Mexico border.
IMPLICATIONS:
The critical hermeneutics approach informed by critical social theory effectively uncovered meanings about immigration and H1N1 disease transmission. The social and historical analysis used to thematically analyze the commentators' statements provides the yardstick to measure the veracity of the commentator's statements. When approached from this perspective, the goal of creating dialogue as a catalyst for social change is achieved through a well-informed process.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleANALYSIS OF NATIONAL MEDIA COMMENTATORS STATEMENTS ON H1N1 FLU, MEXICO AND THE U.Sen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157521-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">ANALYSIS OF NATIONAL MEDIA COMMENTATORS STATEMENTS ON H1N1 FLU, MEXICO AND THE U.S</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hill, Brent D., RN, MS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Utah</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Ph.D. Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">518 E. Emerson Avenue, Salt Lake City, UT, 84105, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">brent.hill@hsc.utah.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS:<br/>The purpose of this preliminary study is to understand the phenomenon of H1N1 disease transmission blame in American national media commentary, specifically as the commentary expresses a perceived threat to Americans posed by Mexicans and illegal immigrants. <br/>RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND:<br/>Pandemics are complex disease processes that cyclically impact humans. Historically, targeted groups of individuals have been blamed for the origin or spread of the disease. Typically, these scapegoat groups are not the primary cause of the disease, or singularly the agents of transmission, yet members of these groups suffer stigma, isolation and even death when healthcare resources are controlled by policies crafted by dominant social groups. In order to break the cycle of unsubstantiated causative blame, evaluation of public discourse can reduce fear and aggression by substantiating fact and dispelling fiction. <br/>METHODS:<br/>Critical hermeneutics informed by critical social theory provided a conceptual framework and method to explore blame and disease transmission of H1N1. The ultimate purpose of this method is to identify and examine power structures that perpetuate oppression, and initiate a dialogue to inform action and social change. The Anti-Defamation League (ADL) identified national media personalities, Glenn Beck, Michelle Malakin, Michael Savage, Pat Buchanan, and Neal Boortz as publicly linking H1N1 threat to Americans from Mexicans and illegal immigrants. Six texts of comments by these media personalities published by the ADL were coded and analyzed using critical hermeneutic methods. The examination of the texts applied Habermas' process of interpreting social context and historical setting. Historical U.S. immigration policies and disease transmission social dialogues provided context for the analysis of the statements in a hermeneutic circle through which themes were identified. <br/>RESULTS:<br/>Themes identified from media statements were: public health policy as a means for immigration control (not supported by historical or social context); immigration/illegal immigrant potential to overwhelm public health services (not supported by historical or social context); selective isolationism as disease prevention (selectively supported by historical context, not supported by social context); Mexican/Illegal immigrant as disease vector (partially supported by historical and social context); known danger of H1N1 (not supported by historical or social context); costs or repercussions of closing U.S. - Mexico border. <br/>IMPLICATIONS:<br/>The critical hermeneutics approach informed by critical social theory effectively uncovered meanings about immigration and H1N1 disease transmission. The social and historical analysis used to thematically analyze the commentators' statements provides the yardstick to measure the veracity of the commentator's statements. When approached from this perspective, the goal of creating dialogue as a catalyst for social change is achieved through a well-informed process.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:56:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:56:56Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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