2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157522
Type:
Presentation
Title:
RESEARCH AND HEALTH INITIATIVES AMONG AMERICAN INDIANS ON THE NAVAJO NATION
Abstract:
RESEARCH AND HEALTH INITIATIVES AMONG AMERICAN INDIANS ON THE NAVAJO NATION
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Hodgins, David, RN, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:Arizona State University
Title:Doctoral student
Contact Address:500 N. 3rd Street, Phoenix, AZ, 85004, USA
Co-Authors:Colleen Keller
PURPOSES/AIMS: The reduction of health disparities that impact the burden of diseases and other adverse health conditions existing among specific population groups in the United States is a major health initiative. Coupled with this are initiatives that underpin strategic plans for health promotion and disease prevention among American Indians. The Navajo Nation, covering nearly 27,000 square miles over three states has more than 250,000 members. The Navajo Nation is characterized by extremes of remote and rural living that impact on healthcare access and reduced community support and resources for healthy lifestyles. This paper discusses issues surrounding the linking of research addressing the efficacy of theory-based interventions among vulnerable subgroups with federal initiatives that target similar health promotion outcomes.
RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: Increased risk for chronic disease is in part related to complex characteristics including genetic differences, sedentary lifestyles, and consumption of atherogenic "Westernized" diets. Two major initiatives developed and implemented by the Indian Health Service include the Director's Chronic Care Initiative and the Health Promotion Disease Prevention Initiative. These initiatives provide resources, education, and a strategic plan to design and implement health promotion programs targeting rural and hard-to-reach American Indians. Further, the initiatives recommend that testing of culturally appropriate effective interventions should underpin risk reduction and treatment interventions. Evaluating efficacious theory-based interventions requires, in part, some evaluation of the notion that the intervention "works" across diverse cultures, ages, and settings.
METHODS: An evaluation of community-based research and programs on the Navajo Nation for their effectiveness, theoretical approach, strength of design and applicable outcomes was synthesized. The Re-Aim model, Reach of participation, Efficacy of interventions, Adoption (setting) of interventions, Implementation (fidelity), and Maintenance of the interventions were assessed for applicability to the setting, the sample and the context of health promotion initiatives in American Indians.
RESULTS: Few interventions are evident in the research reporting effective theory-based interventions. Few interventions were found that specifically target the health problems most significant to the peoples of the Navajo Nation, such as cardiovascular risk factors, chronic disease management, hypertension treatment compliance, weight management, and type 2 diabetes management.
IMPLICATIONS: Future risk reduction interventions targeting American Indians on the Navajo Nation need to be designed for maximum effectiveness. Clearly delineating for whom the intervention 'works' and in what setting are needed to facilitate health promotion efforts. Specific strategies will be discussed in developing links between research addressing the efficacy of theory-based interventions and public health initiatives.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRESEARCH AND HEALTH INITIATIVES AMONG AMERICAN INDIANS ON THE NAVAJO NATIONen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157522-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">RESEARCH AND HEALTH INITIATIVES AMONG AMERICAN INDIANS ON THE NAVAJO NATION</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hodgins, David, RN, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arizona State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">500 N. 3rd Street, Phoenix, AZ, 85004, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">David.Hodgins@asu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Colleen Keller</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS: The reduction of health disparities that impact the burden of diseases and other adverse health conditions existing among specific population groups in the United States is a major health initiative. Coupled with this are initiatives that underpin strategic plans for health promotion and disease prevention among American Indians. The Navajo Nation, covering nearly 27,000 square miles over three states has more than 250,000 members. The Navajo Nation is characterized by extremes of remote and rural living that impact on healthcare access and reduced community support and resources for healthy lifestyles. This paper discusses issues surrounding the linking of research addressing the efficacy of theory-based interventions among vulnerable subgroups with federal initiatives that target similar health promotion outcomes. <br/>RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: Increased risk for chronic disease is in part related to complex characteristics including genetic differences, sedentary lifestyles, and consumption of atherogenic &quot;Westernized&quot; diets. Two major initiatives developed and implemented by the Indian Health Service include the Director's Chronic Care Initiative and the Health Promotion Disease Prevention Initiative. These initiatives provide resources, education, and a strategic plan to design and implement health promotion programs targeting rural and hard-to-reach American Indians. Further, the initiatives recommend that testing of culturally appropriate effective interventions should underpin risk reduction and treatment interventions. Evaluating efficacious theory-based interventions requires, in part, some evaluation of the notion that the intervention &quot;works&quot; across diverse cultures, ages, and settings. <br/>METHODS: An evaluation of community-based research and programs on the Navajo Nation for their effectiveness, theoretical approach, strength of design and applicable outcomes was synthesized. The Re-Aim model, Reach of participation, Efficacy of interventions, Adoption (setting) of interventions, Implementation (fidelity), and Maintenance of the interventions were assessed for applicability to the setting, the sample and the context of health promotion initiatives in American Indians. <br/>RESULTS: Few interventions are evident in the research reporting effective theory-based interventions. Few interventions were found that specifically target the health problems most significant to the peoples of the Navajo Nation, such as cardiovascular risk factors, chronic disease management, hypertension treatment compliance, weight management, and type 2 diabetes management. <br/>IMPLICATIONS: Future risk reduction interventions targeting American Indians on the Navajo Nation need to be designed for maximum effectiveness. Clearly delineating for whom the intervention 'works' and in what setting are needed to facilitate health promotion efforts. Specific strategies will be discussed in developing links between research addressing the efficacy of theory-based interventions and public health initiatives.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:57:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:57:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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