2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157523
Type:
Presentation
Title:
GIVING BIRTH DOWN UNDER: THE VOICES OF AUSTRALIAN WOMEN
Abstract:
GIVING BIRTH DOWN UNDER: THE VOICES OF AUSTRALIAN WOMEN
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Holt, Shelly, BS, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Primary Childrens Medical Center
Title:Staff nurse
Contact Address:Brigham Young University 136 SWKT, Provo, UT, 84602, USA
Co-Authors:Lynn Clark Callister; Melody Kuhre
PURPOSE: The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to identify Australian women's perceptions of giving birth.
BACKGROUND: Women give birth within their socio-cultural context, including healthcare delivery systems. Listening to the voices of women is essential to increase nurses' sensitivity to the needs of childbearing women and inform healthcare. Australian socio-cultural trends include declining birth rates and smaller families. Some Australian women delay childbearing until after they are 35 years of age, and others are choosing to remain voluntarily childless. Since the 1970's the fertility rate has been below replacement level. Because of this declining birth rate, the Australian government has implemented a "baby bonus" incentive for having a child. The need was identified to obtain data on the perceptions of giving birth in Australian women.
METHOD: Following IRB approval and informed consent, a convenience sample of 17 Australian women who had given birth in the past year participated in audio-taped interviews. These interviews were transcribed and themes generated based on the rich narrative data. Member checks were done with five study participants to ensure trustworthiness of the data.
RESULTS: Participants described themselves as "Aussies" wanting to exercise considerable control over decisions relating to their pregnancies and birth with input from their caregivers as consultants. Themes included focusing on the moment of birth, being empowered by giving birth, defining the spiritual dimension of giving birth, birth as trauma or having a diminished birth, feeling concern for the child, coming to know the child, and receiving care: nurses making a difference. One woman said, "There's nothing else like it. ItÆs amazing - creating your own baby and then giving birth." Another said, "I experienced full-on labor, and that was just the most amazing experience. Oh my gosh, you think you're going to die. So I'm glad that I went through it and I'm amazed that I did it. My body is capable of a lot more pain than I give it credit for! Your body is amazing and is designed to give birth. Mothers all over the world have done it, and I did it!" Three study participants described their births as traumatic, with one saying, "[The birth] was a blur. The whole birth experience was overwhelming. It was just so intense. I needed to debrief. At the time I thought that I would never want to do that again."
IMPLICATIONS: FOR CLINICAL PRACTICE: Study findings confirm that Australian women expect and appreciate shared power with their caregiver. In the provision of healthcare for childbearing women, the importance of caring, connection, and shared power between nurses and women in order to ameliorate potential negative psychosocial outcomes cannot be overemphasized. It is essential to provide individualized nursing care that creates a climate of confidence in childbearing women.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGIVING BIRTH DOWN UNDER: THE VOICES OF AUSTRALIAN WOMENen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157523-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">GIVING BIRTH DOWN UNDER: THE VOICES OF AUSTRALIAN WOMEN</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Holt, Shelly, BS, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Primary Childrens Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Staff nurse</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Brigham Young University 136 SWKT, Provo, UT, 84602, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">shellbell71@gmail.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Lynn Clark Callister; Melody Kuhre</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE: The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to identify Australian women's perceptions of giving birth. <br/>BACKGROUND: Women give birth within their socio-cultural context, including healthcare delivery systems. Listening to the voices of women is essential to increase nurses' sensitivity to the needs of childbearing women and inform healthcare. Australian socio-cultural trends include declining birth rates and smaller families. Some Australian women delay childbearing until after they are 35 years of age, and others are choosing to remain voluntarily childless. Since the 1970's the fertility rate has been below replacement level. Because of this declining birth rate, the Australian government has implemented a &quot;baby bonus&quot; incentive for having a child. The need was identified to obtain data on the perceptions of giving birth in Australian women. <br/>METHOD: Following IRB approval and informed consent, a convenience sample of 17 Australian women who had given birth in the past year participated in audio-taped interviews. These interviews were transcribed and themes generated based on the rich narrative data. Member checks were done with five study participants to ensure trustworthiness of the data. <br/>RESULTS: Participants described themselves as &quot;Aussies&quot; wanting to exercise considerable control over decisions relating to their pregnancies and birth with input from their caregivers as consultants. Themes included focusing on the moment of birth, being empowered by giving birth, defining the spiritual dimension of giving birth, birth as trauma or having a diminished birth, feeling concern for the child, coming to know the child, and receiving care: nurses making a difference. One woman said, &quot;There's nothing else like it. It&AElig;s amazing - creating your own baby and then giving birth.&quot; Another said, &quot;I experienced full-on labor, and that was just the most amazing experience. Oh my gosh, you think you're going to die. So I'm glad that I went through it and I'm amazed that I did it. My body is capable of a lot more pain than I give it credit for! Your body is amazing and is designed to give birth. Mothers all over the world have done it, and I did it!&quot; Three study participants described their births as traumatic, with one saying, &quot;[The birth] was a blur. The whole birth experience was overwhelming. It was just so intense. I needed to debrief. At the time I thought that I would never want to do that again.&quot; <br/>IMPLICATIONS: FOR CLINICAL PRACTICE: Study findings confirm that Australian women expect and appreciate shared power with their caregiver. In the provision of healthcare for childbearing women, the importance of caring, connection, and shared power between nurses and women in order to ameliorate potential negative psychosocial outcomes cannot be overemphasized. It is essential to provide individualized nursing care that creates a climate of confidence in childbearing women.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:57:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:57:03Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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