2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157524
Type:
Presentation
Title:
PREMENSTRUAL SYMPTOMS AND ACADEMIC STRESS IN EMERGING ADULTHOOD WOMEN
Abstract:
PREMENSTRUAL SYMPTOMS AND ACADEMIC STRESS IN EMERGING ADULTHOOD WOMEN
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Hulstein, Pamela L., PhD, ARNP, CNM
P.I. Institution Name:Dordt College
Title:Associate Professor of Nursing
Contact Address:498 4th Ave. NE, Sioux Center, IA, 51250, USA
PURPOSES/AIMS: 1) Describe follicular and luteal phase symptom perception, severity and distress in emerging adulthood women, 2) Describe academic stress in this sample, and 3) Explore the relationship between follicular and luteal phase symptom perception, severity and distress; and academic stress (student-life stress and academic demand).
CONCEPTUAL BACKGROUND/BACKGROUND: Premenstrual symptoms are a universal experience and up to 90% of reproductive age women experience a collective constellation of symptoms. Stress is known to have negative impact (heightened symptom severity, more symptoms) on women's experience of premenstrual symptoms. Emerging adulthood women in an academic setting face additional stress (social support, residential living, and academic demand) which may enhance or exacerbate symptom experience. Aday's Framework for Studying Vulnerable Populations guided investigation of individual well-being for women experiencing premenstrual symptoms and academic stress.
METHODS: A descriptive longitudinal design included a baseline measure of academic stress with Gadzella's Student-life Stress Inventory. An electronic daily symptom diary was used to collect data across one complete menstrual cycle via the Menstrual Symptom Severity List (MSSL) to record symptom perception, severity and distress; and academic demands (assignments, papers, projects due, and time spent studying) and distress ratings.
RESULTS: The answer to study aim 1 was evident as the sample of 50 fulltime undergraduate women, mean age 20(+/- .9) years had significantly higher numbers of symptoms perceived (7.16 +/- 3.8 follicular and 6.18 +/- 3.3 luteal, p=.001) and higher distress (.39 +/- .3 follicular and .31 +/- .3 luteal, p=.003) in the follicular phase than in the luteal phase. These findings were unexpected, as previous research demonstrated more symptoms with higher distress in the luteal phase. Academic stress findings, related to study aim 2, indicated mild stress and overall perceived stress level in the minimal to mild range. RESULTS: The answer to specific aim 3 indicated that within the follicular phase, number of assignments due was significantly correlated to symptom perception and distress (.32, .37, respectively) and the number of projects/presentations due was correlated to symptom distress (.25) at p<.05. Significant correlations occurred between follicular phase symptom perception and distress and luteal phase symptom distress with all academic demand types whereby a relationship between distress components of symptom experience and demand components of academic stress was demonstrated.
IMPLICATIONS: This study provided a foundation from which individual symptom experience, in a relatively obscure population of emerging adulthood women, could be ascertained. The premier results warrant further exploration. The residential college context provided a unique opportunity to explore the relationship between symptom experience and academic stress. Future research can utilize the knowledge generated from this study to improve the use of daily electronic diaries for individual data collection about follicular and luteal symptoms with computer savvy emerging adulthood women.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePREMENSTRUAL SYMPTOMS AND ACADEMIC STRESS IN EMERGING ADULTHOOD WOMENen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157524-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">PREMENSTRUAL SYMPTOMS AND ACADEMIC STRESS IN EMERGING ADULTHOOD WOMEN</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hulstein, Pamela L., PhD, ARNP, CNM</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Dordt College</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">498 4th Ave. NE, Sioux Center, IA, 51250, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hulstein@dordt.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS: 1) Describe follicular and luteal phase symptom perception, severity and distress in emerging adulthood women, 2) Describe academic stress in this sample, and 3) Explore the relationship between follicular and luteal phase symptom perception, severity and distress; and academic stress (student-life stress and academic demand).<br/>CONCEPTUAL BACKGROUND/BACKGROUND: Premenstrual symptoms are a universal experience and up to 90% of reproductive age women experience a collective constellation of symptoms. Stress is known to have negative impact (heightened symptom severity, more symptoms) on women's experience of premenstrual symptoms. Emerging adulthood women in an academic setting face additional stress (social support, residential living, and academic demand) which may enhance or exacerbate symptom experience. Aday's Framework for Studying Vulnerable Populations guided investigation of individual well-being for women experiencing premenstrual symptoms and academic stress.<br/>METHODS: A descriptive longitudinal design included a baseline measure of academic stress with Gadzella's Student-life Stress Inventory. An electronic daily symptom diary was used to collect data across one complete menstrual cycle via the Menstrual Symptom Severity List (MSSL) to record symptom perception, severity and distress; and academic demands (assignments, papers, projects due, and time spent studying) and distress ratings.<br/>RESULTS: The answer to study aim 1 was evident as the sample of 50 fulltime undergraduate women, mean age 20(+/- .9) years had significantly higher numbers of symptoms perceived (7.16 +/- 3.8 follicular and 6.18 +/- 3.3 luteal, p=.001) and higher distress (.39 +/- .3 follicular and .31 +/- .3 luteal, p=.003) in the follicular phase than in the luteal phase. These findings were unexpected, as previous research demonstrated more symptoms with higher distress in the luteal phase. Academic stress findings, related to study aim 2, indicated mild stress and overall perceived stress level in the minimal to mild range. RESULTS: The answer to specific aim 3 indicated that within the follicular phase, number of assignments due was significantly correlated to symptom perception and distress (.32, .37, respectively) and the number of projects/presentations due was correlated to symptom distress (.25) at p&lt;.05. Significant correlations occurred between follicular phase symptom perception and distress and luteal phase symptom distress with all academic demand types whereby a relationship between distress components of symptom experience and demand components of academic stress was demonstrated. <br/>IMPLICATIONS: This study provided a foundation from which individual symptom experience, in a relatively obscure population of emerging adulthood women, could be ascertained. The premier results warrant further exploration. The residential college context provided a unique opportunity to explore the relationship between symptom experience and academic stress. Future research can utilize the knowledge generated from this study to improve the use of daily electronic diaries for individual data collection about follicular and luteal symptoms with computer savvy emerging adulthood women. <br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:57:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:57:06Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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