2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157525
Type:
Presentation
Title:
URIC ACID, OBESITY, AND HYPERTENSION IN ADOLESCENTS
Abstract:
URIC ACID, OBESITY, AND HYPERTENSION IN ADOLESCENTS
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Huston, Aaron, MSN, ARNP
P.I. Institution Name:Washington State University
Title:Doctoral Student
Contact Address:PO Box 1495, 103 E. Spokane Falls Blvd, Spokane, WA, 99210-1495, USA
PURPOSES/AIMS:
The purposes of this study were to: 1) describe serum uric acid levels, weight status, and blood pressure in a sample of middle school adolescents, and 2) investigate associations between the variables of weight status, serum uric acid, and hypertension in the study sub-sample of obese adolescents.

RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND:
The prevalence of obesity in children is increasing at an alarming rate. Several serious physical and emotional consequences of childhood obesity have been well documented, including an increased risk of hypertension. While elevated uric acid in adults has been positively associated with cardiometabolic risk, the relationships are not well delineated in youth. The Teen Eating and Activity Mentoring in Schools (TEAMS) study was designed to investigate and prevent the development of obesity during adolescence. This study examines the relationship between serum uric acid, weight status, and blood pressure in adolescent subjects.
METHODS:
After university and school district IRB approval, assessments were completed in 2007-2009 with middle school students enrolled in the TEAMS study. Height was measured on a standing stadiomenter to the nearest 1/10 inch with the students' shoes, hair ornaments, hats, jewelry or braids removed. Weight was measured on a Seca digital scale to the nearest pound with shoes, coats and other heavy clothing removed. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated as kg/m2. Fasting serum blood samples were obtained by phlebotomists and transported to Pathology Associates Medical Laboratory for analysis. Blood pressure was measured three times on the right arm according to the protocol of National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute.
RESULTS:
Data were obtained for 135 adolescents; 59 (43.7%) were male and 76 (56.3%) were female. Mean serum uric acid was 4.9 and 4.8 mg/dL for males and females respectively. One-way ANOVA was completed using serum uric acid as a dichotomous variable and systolic blood pressure as a dependent variable. Adolescents with elevated uric acid levels (equal to or greater than 5.5 mg/dL) had significantly higher systolic blood pressure. Forty-four percent of subjects were either overweight or obese (equal to or greater than 85th percentile for BMI) (35.6% of males, and 51.3% of females), while 27% of subjects (12 male and 25 female) were obese (equal to or greater than 95th percentile for BMI). Descriptive and correlational statistics will be provided, demonstrating the effect of obesity on uric acid levels and blood pressure.

IMPLICATIONS:
Our study indicates that there is a significant association between serum uric acid and blood pressure in obese adolescent subjects. Application of findings to the practicing nurse, as well as additional needed research, will be discussed.
This project was supported by National Research Initiative Grant 2006-04637 from the USDA National Institute for Food and Agriculture.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleURIC ACID, OBESITY, AND HYPERTENSION IN ADOLESCENTSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157525-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">URIC ACID, OBESITY, AND HYPERTENSION IN ADOLESCENTS</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Huston, Aaron, MSN, ARNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Washington State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">PO Box 1495, 103 E. Spokane Falls Blvd, Spokane, WA, 99210-1495, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">achuston@wsu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS: <br/>The purposes of this study were to: 1) describe serum uric acid levels, weight status, and blood pressure in a sample of middle school adolescents, and 2) investigate associations between the variables of weight status, serum uric acid, and hypertension in the study sub-sample of obese adolescents.<br/> <br/>RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: <br/>The prevalence of obesity in children is increasing at an alarming rate. Several serious physical and emotional consequences of childhood obesity have been well documented, including an increased risk of hypertension. While elevated uric acid in adults has been positively associated with cardiometabolic risk, the relationships are not well delineated in youth. The Teen Eating and Activity Mentoring in Schools (TEAMS) study was designed to investigate and prevent the development of obesity during adolescence. This study examines the relationship between serum uric acid, weight status, and blood pressure in adolescent subjects.<br/>METHODS: <br/>After university and school district IRB approval, assessments were completed in 2007-2009 with middle school students enrolled in the TEAMS study. Height was measured on a standing stadiomenter to the nearest 1/10 inch with the students' shoes, hair ornaments, hats, jewelry or braids removed. Weight was measured on a Seca digital scale to the nearest pound with shoes, coats and other heavy clothing removed. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated as kg/m2. Fasting serum blood samples were obtained by phlebotomists and transported to Pathology Associates Medical Laboratory for analysis. Blood pressure was measured three times on the right arm according to the protocol of National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. <br/>RESULTS: <br/>Data were obtained for 135 adolescents; 59 (43.7%) were male and 76 (56.3%) were female. Mean serum uric acid was 4.9 and 4.8 mg/dL for males and females respectively. One-way ANOVA was completed using serum uric acid as a dichotomous variable and systolic blood pressure as a dependent variable. Adolescents with elevated uric acid levels (equal to or greater than 5.5 mg/dL) had significantly higher systolic blood pressure. Forty-four percent of subjects were either overweight or obese (equal to or greater than 85th percentile for BMI) (35.6% of males, and 51.3% of females), while 27% of subjects (12 male and 25 female) were obese (equal to or greater than 95th percentile for BMI). Descriptive and correlational statistics will be provided, demonstrating the effect of obesity on uric acid levels and blood pressure.<br/> <br/>IMPLICATIONS: <br/>Our study indicates that there is a significant association between serum uric acid and blood pressure in obese adolescent subjects. Application of findings to the practicing nurse, as well as additional needed research, will be discussed. <br/> This project was supported by National Research Initiative Grant 2006-04637 from the USDA National Institute for Food and Agriculture.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:57:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:57:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.