2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157527
Type:
Presentation
Title:
EXPERIENCES OF PARTNERS LIVING WITH END-STAGE HEART FAILURE
Abstract:
EXPERIENCES OF PARTNERS LIVING WITH END-STAGE HEART FAILURE
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Imes, Christopher C., RN, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington School of Nursing
Title:Doctoral Student
Contact Address:1959 NE Pacific Street, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA
Co-Authors:Cynthia M. Dougherty; Mark D. Sullivan
PURPOSES/AIMS: The purpose of this study was to understand the experiences of living with HF from the perspective of the partner and determine how health care providers can help during this stressful and challenging time.
RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: Heart failure is a debilitating chronic illness characterized by frequent exacerbations in symptoms that result in hospitalizations, high mortality rates, and impaired quality of life. Self-care for heart failure (HF) requires the assistance of other persons to enable the patient to manage the demands of the illness at home. Little is understood about the impact of caring for the HF patient on the physical and mental health of spousal caregivers. Given the complexity of HF management, it is expected that a large and growing number of family caregivers are currently involved in HF care at home.
METHODS: Using a descriptive approach, in-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with 14 partners of patients with NYHA Class 3 or 4 HF after a HF hospital admission in the patient. After hospital discharge, telephone interviews with partners were audio-recorded and transcribed. Analysis was performed using the constant comparative approach.
RESULTS: Partners were 68.3+ 7.7 years old, 87.5% female, 83% Caucasian, married to the patient, with some college education. Patients were 68.0+7.1 years old, 88% men, 83% Caucasian, having lived with HF an average of 8.0 years. Patients had 1.5+1.1 HF hospitalizations in the previous year. Three categories were derived from data: (1) My experience of HF in my loved one, (2) My experience with healthcare providers, and (3) Patient's experience of HF. My experience of HF was further divided in to six related sub-themes: How I help, My view, What I want, What helps me, Impact on us, and Impact on me. My experienced with healthcare providers included the sub-themes: Treatment, Prognosis, Frustrations, and Providers Don't Help Me.
IMPLICATIONS: The patient's disease limited the partner's lifestyle, created social isolation and depression, and altered plans for the future for the couple. The partners felt they were ill prepared for the treatment, progression, and the ultimate death from HF. Partners wanted providers to understand their struggles in caregiving at home, and wanted more information about the disease in language they could understand. End-of-life planning was neither encouraged by the healthcare provider, nor embraced by the patient and partner. Future research should address caregiver needs in advanced HF.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEXPERIENCES OF PARTNERS LIVING WITH END-STAGE HEART FAILUREen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157527-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">EXPERIENCES OF PARTNERS LIVING WITH END-STAGE HEART FAILURE</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Imes, Christopher C., RN, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1959 NE Pacific Street, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">imesc@uw.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Cynthia M. Dougherty; Mark D. Sullivan</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS: The purpose of this study was to understand the experiences of living with HF from the perspective of the partner and determine how health care providers can help during this stressful and challenging time. <br/>RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: Heart failure is a debilitating chronic illness characterized by frequent exacerbations in symptoms that result in hospitalizations, high mortality rates, and impaired quality of life. Self-care for heart failure (HF) requires the assistance of other persons to enable the patient to manage the demands of the illness at home. Little is understood about the impact of caring for the HF patient on the physical and mental health of spousal caregivers. Given the complexity of HF management, it is expected that a large and growing number of family caregivers are currently involved in HF care at home. <br/>METHODS: Using a descriptive approach, in-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with 14 partners of patients with NYHA Class 3 or 4 HF after a HF hospital admission in the patient. After hospital discharge, telephone interviews with partners were audio-recorded and transcribed. Analysis was performed using the constant comparative approach. <br/>RESULTS: Partners were 68.3+ 7.7 years old, 87.5% female, 83% Caucasian, married to the patient, with some college education. Patients were 68.0+7.1 years old, 88% men, 83% Caucasian, having lived with HF an average of 8.0 years. Patients had 1.5+1.1 HF hospitalizations in the previous year. Three categories were derived from data: (1) My experience of HF in my loved one, (2) My experience with healthcare providers, and (3) Patient's experience of HF. My experience of HF was further divided in to six related sub-themes: How I help, My view, What I want, What helps me, Impact on us, and Impact on me. My experienced with healthcare providers included the sub-themes: Treatment, Prognosis, Frustrations, and Providers Don't Help Me. <br/>IMPLICATIONS: The patient's disease limited the partner's lifestyle, created social isolation and depression, and altered plans for the future for the couple. The partners felt they were ill prepared for the treatment, progression, and the ultimate death from HF. Partners wanted providers to understand their struggles in caregiving at home, and wanted more information about the disease in language they could understand. End-of-life planning was neither encouraged by the healthcare provider, nor embraced by the patient and partner. Future research should address caregiver needs in advanced HF.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:57:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:57:17Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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