EMOTIONAL DISTRESS INFLUENCES VAGAL TONE IN CHILDREN WITH RECURRENT ABDOMINAL PAIN

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157529
Type:
Presentation
Title:
EMOTIONAL DISTRESS INFLUENCES VAGAL TONE IN CHILDREN WITH RECURRENT ABDOMINAL PAIN
Abstract:
EMOTIONAL DISTRESS INFLUENCES VAGAL TONE IN CHILDREN WITH RECURRENT ABDOMINAL PAIN
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Jarrett, Monica E., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington
Title:Professor
Contact Address:1959 NE Pacific Street, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA
Co-Authors:Robert L. Burr; Margaret M., Heitkemper; Robert Shulman
PURPOSE: To examine the association between emotional distress and indicators of vagal tone in children with Recurrent Abdominal Pain (RAP) compared to healthy control children.
BACKGROUND: Abdominal pain is a common symptom in children and adolescents. The prevalence of recurrent abdominal pain varies from 2.4%-16% in school age children. When abdominal pain persists for at least three months without an identifiable cause children are given a diagnosis of RAP. These children often have higher levels of anxiety, depression, and somatization than healthy control children. In adults with similar disorder, irritable bowel syndrome, our group has reported differences in measures of vagal tone associated with depression and anxiety symptoms.
METHODS: An observational design was used to compare children, 7 to 10 years of age, with a diagnosis of RAP seen in a pediatric gastroenterologist's practice or in a pediatrician's practice to a comparison group of healthy children (Control). Emotional distress was measured with Children's Depression Inventory (CDI), State-Trait Anxiety Scale for Children (STAIC) and Children's Somatization Inventory (CSI). Cardiac vagal modulation was assessed using a 24 hour Holter recorder of heart rate availability.
RESULTS: Over all, 50 boys and 117 girls contribute data to this analysis. Within the subgroup of girls, those in the RAP group had significantly elevated scores for depression, trait anxiety, and somatization compared to controls. Within the smaller subgroup of boys, only depression was significantly higher. None of the HR and HRV measures were significantly different between the RAP and the control children in separate analyses of the boy or the girls, using age and BMI as controlling covariates. The most statistically significant hypothesis-consistent effects are moderate relationships (r > 0.34, p < .004) between the nocturnal vagal modulation and the psychological scales measuring trait anxiety and depression that are concentrated within the stratum of RAP girls.
IMPLICATIONS: School age girls with RAP and relatively high levels of self-reported anxiety and depression have lower vagal tone. If these patterns persist into adulthood it may perpetuate this constellation of symptoms either as IBS or some other functional gastrointestinal disorder.
Supported by a grant from the NINR, NIH (NR05337 and P30 NR04001).
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEMOTIONAL DISTRESS INFLUENCES VAGAL TONE IN CHILDREN WITH RECURRENT ABDOMINAL PAINen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157529-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">EMOTIONAL DISTRESS INFLUENCES VAGAL TONE IN CHILDREN WITH RECURRENT ABDOMINAL PAIN</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Jarrett, Monica E., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1959 NE Pacific Street, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jarrett@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Robert L. Burr; Margaret M., Heitkemper; Robert Shulman</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE: To examine the association between emotional distress and indicators of vagal tone in children with Recurrent Abdominal Pain (RAP) compared to healthy control children.<br/>BACKGROUND: Abdominal pain is a common symptom in children and adolescents. The prevalence of recurrent abdominal pain varies from 2.4%-16% in school age children. When abdominal pain persists for at least three months without an identifiable cause children are given a diagnosis of RAP. These children often have higher levels of anxiety, depression, and somatization than healthy control children. In adults with similar disorder, irritable bowel syndrome, our group has reported differences in measures of vagal tone associated with depression and anxiety symptoms. <br/>METHODS: An observational design was used to compare children, 7 to 10 years of age, with a diagnosis of RAP seen in a pediatric gastroenterologist's practice or in a pediatrician's practice to a comparison group of healthy children (Control). Emotional distress was measured with Children's Depression Inventory (CDI), State-Trait Anxiety Scale for Children (STAIC) and Children's Somatization Inventory (CSI). Cardiac vagal modulation was assessed using a 24 hour Holter recorder of heart rate availability.<br/>RESULTS: Over all, 50 boys and 117 girls contribute data to this analysis. Within the subgroup of girls, those in the RAP group had significantly elevated scores for depression, trait anxiety, and somatization compared to controls. Within the smaller subgroup of boys, only depression was significantly higher. None of the HR and HRV measures were significantly different between the RAP and the control children in separate analyses of the boy or the girls, using age and BMI as controlling covariates. The most statistically significant hypothesis-consistent effects are moderate relationships (r &gt; 0.34, p &lt; .004) between the nocturnal vagal modulation and the psychological scales measuring trait anxiety and depression that are concentrated within the stratum of RAP girls. <br/>IMPLICATIONS: School age girls with RAP and relatively high levels of self-reported anxiety and depression have lower vagal tone. If these patterns persist into adulthood it may perpetuate this constellation of symptoms either as IBS or some other functional gastrointestinal disorder.<br/> Supported by a grant from the NINR, NIH (NR05337 and P30 NR04001). <br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:57:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:57:23Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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