SEXUAL-RISK BEHAVIORS AMONG REGULAR AND ALTERNATIVE HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS IN MINNESOTA

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157530
Type:
Presentation
Title:
SEXUAL-RISK BEHAVIORS AMONG REGULAR AND ALTERNATIVE HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS IN MINNESOTA
Abstract:
SEXUAL-RISK BEHAVIORS AMONG REGULAR AND ALTERNATIVE HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS IN MINNESOTA
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Johnson, Karen E., RN, BS
P.I. Institution Name:University of Minnesota
Title:PhD student
Contact Address:5-140 Weaver Densford Hall, 308 Harvard Street SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA
Co-Authors:Barbara J. McMorris; Martha Y. Kubik
PURPOSES/AIMS:
To compare the prevalence of sexual-risk behaviors among alternative high school (AHS) and regular high school (RHS) students in Minnesota.
RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND:
Nearly one million U.S. students attend AHS's, which serve students at risk for academic failure. Previous findings from the 1997 and 1998 Youth Risk Behavior Survey indicated that AHS students had a higher prevalence of sexual-risk behaviors than RHS students. With a growing AHS population, it is important to understand their current sexual-risk behaviors in order to develop effective preventive programs and policies that target personal and social-ecological factors that place these youth at greater risk for unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections.
METHODS:
The Minnesota Student Survey (MSS), a large statewide population-based survey conducted every three years, asks students in regular public schools (grades 6, 9, and 12) and alternative high schools about a range of health behaviors, including sexual health. Data from the 2007 MSS for students in 9th and 12th grade (n= 87,468; mean age= 15.93; 50.6% female; 22% racial/ethnic minority) and for students attending AHS's (n=2,847; mean age= 16.96; 46.2% female; 44% racial/ethnic minority) were used for the current study. Prevalence estimates for selected sexual-risk behaviors were compared. Estimates were adjusted for age and race/ethnicity.
RESULTS:
AHS students were significantly more likely than RHS students to report a lifetime history of sexual intercourse (74.5% vs. 39.3%, p< .0001), four or more sexual partners during the past year (22.1% vs. 9.3%, p< .0001), current sexual activity (71.1% vs. 37.2%, p< .0001); and no condom use at last intercourse (51.2% vs. 36.7%, p<.0001).
IMPLICATIONS:
Nurses should be aware of the higher prevalence of sexual-risk behaviors among AHS students. Further study is needed to better understand the correlates and predictors of sexual-risk behaviors among AHS students and to develop comprehensive, evidence-based sexuality education programs and policies that can promote safer sexual practices among this at-risk population.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSEXUAL-RISK BEHAVIORS AMONG REGULAR AND ALTERNATIVE HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS IN MINNESOTAen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157530-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">SEXUAL-RISK BEHAVIORS AMONG REGULAR AND ALTERNATIVE HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS IN MINNESOTA</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Johnson, Karen E., RN, BS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Minnesota</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">PhD student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">5-140 Weaver Densford Hall, 308 Harvard Street SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">joh04404@umn.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Barbara J. McMorris; Martha Y. Kubik</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS: <br/>To compare the prevalence of sexual-risk behaviors among alternative high school (AHS) and regular high school (RHS) students in Minnesota. <br/>RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: <br/>Nearly one million U.S. students attend AHS's, which serve students at risk for academic failure. Previous findings from the 1997 and 1998 Youth Risk Behavior Survey indicated that AHS students had a higher prevalence of sexual-risk behaviors than RHS students. With a growing AHS population, it is important to understand their current sexual-risk behaviors in order to develop effective preventive programs and policies that target personal and social-ecological factors that place these youth at greater risk for unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections. <br/>METHODS: <br/>The Minnesota Student Survey (MSS), a large statewide population-based survey conducted every three years, asks students in regular public schools (grades 6, 9, and 12) and alternative high schools about a range of health behaviors, including sexual health. Data from the 2007 MSS for students in 9th and 12th grade (n= 87,468; mean age= 15.93; 50.6% female; 22% racial/ethnic minority) and for students attending AHS's (n=2,847; mean age= 16.96; 46.2% female; 44% racial/ethnic minority) were used for the current study. Prevalence estimates for selected sexual-risk behaviors were compared. Estimates were adjusted for age and race/ethnicity. <br/>RESULTS: <br/>AHS students were significantly more likely than RHS students to report a lifetime history of sexual intercourse (74.5% vs. 39.3%, p&lt; .0001), four or more sexual partners during the past year (22.1% vs. 9.3%, p&lt; .0001), current sexual activity (71.1% vs. 37.2%, p&lt; .0001); and no condom use at last intercourse (51.2% vs. 36.7%, p&lt;.0001). <br/>IMPLICATIONS:<br/>Nurses should be aware of the higher prevalence of sexual-risk behaviors among AHS students. Further study is needed to better understand the correlates and predictors of sexual-risk behaviors among AHS students and to develop comprehensive, evidence-based sexuality education programs and policies that can promote safer sexual practices among this at-risk population. <br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:57:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:57:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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