2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157531
Type:
Presentation
Title:
NURSING SURVEILLANCE: AN OBSERVATIONAL STUDY
Abstract:
NURSING SURVEILLANCE: AN OBSERVATIONAL STUDY
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Jones, Jacqueline, PhD, RN, BN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Colorado Denver
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:Campus Box C-288-19 , Education 2 North, 13120 E. 19th Ave., Aurora, CO, 80045, USA
AIMS: The overall aim of this presentation is to explore nursing surveillance through the findings of an observational study of nursing activity conducted in the major Tertiary level cardiothoracic referral hospital for Queensland, the largest such unit in Australia.
RATIONALE: Nursing surveillance is a comparatively new term within acute care to describe the processes of ongoing observation and data collection including vigilant watching for physiological or behavioral changes during interactions with patients or whilst at a distance. It has cumulative, temporal and contextual aspects and is a collective effort of interventions delivered by multiple nurses over time, as well as interventions by individual nurses.
METHODS: The aim of this study was to describe the activities undertaken by regulated and unregulated nursing staff across 3 wards (medical, surgical and sub acute) in a 550 bed public hospital. The data set consists of 32,609 episodes of 10 minute observation collected using work sampling technique. The focus of these analyses is two weeks of randomized empirical data collected over a nine week period using a structured observation tool. The data collection instrument previously used in other Australian studies and adapted from the US, identified 25 activities grouped into four categories, direct patient care, indirect care, unit related activities and personal activities.
RESULTS: All nurses employed on each ward gave consent and were observed in this study (n=92). Age (mean 42, SD 10.2) and gender (male = 8.2%) of nurses within the sample were comparable to State demographics. Total nursing experience ranged from less than 1 year, a new graduate, to 45 years. Experience on the ward under study ranged from less than one year to 15 years. (Note: not able to display table that illustrates an example of the direct care activities documented.)
IMPLICATIONS: What nurses are doing and what they say they are doing can be a telling gap to explore in bringing nurses in closer proximity to patients for safety, to prevent failure to rescue and to build effective nursing surveillance system. RESULTS: This study support that nursing numbers, nurse - patient ratios, qualifications and experience do not alone capture the nuances of the 'way in which nurses work'; what nurses are doing 'at the bedside or beyond'; the way in which they perform 'surveillance' as individuals, as a workgroup and as a unit to facilitate safe patient outcomes. In addition, it is clear that further research is needed to identify what 'effective' surveillance is.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNURSING SURVEILLANCE: AN OBSERVATIONAL STUDYen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157531-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">NURSING SURVEILLANCE: AN OBSERVATIONAL STUDY</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Jones, Jacqueline, PhD, RN, BN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Colorado Denver</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Campus Box C-288-19 , Education 2 North, 13120 E. 19th Ave., Aurora, CO, 80045, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jacqueline.jones@ucdenver.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">AIMS: The overall aim of this presentation is to explore nursing surveillance through the findings of an observational study of nursing activity conducted in the major Tertiary level cardiothoracic referral hospital for Queensland, the largest such unit in Australia. <br/>RATIONALE: Nursing surveillance is a comparatively new term within acute care to describe the processes of ongoing observation and data collection including vigilant watching for physiological or behavioral changes during interactions with patients or whilst at a distance. It has cumulative, temporal and contextual aspects and is a collective effort of interventions delivered by multiple nurses over time, as well as interventions by individual nurses. <br/>METHODS: The aim of this study was to describe the activities undertaken by regulated and unregulated nursing staff across 3 wards (medical, surgical and sub acute) in a 550 bed public hospital. The data set consists of 32,609 episodes of 10 minute observation collected using work sampling technique. The focus of these analyses is two weeks of randomized empirical data collected over a nine week period using a structured observation tool. The data collection instrument previously used in other Australian studies and adapted from the US, identified 25 activities grouped into four categories, direct patient care, indirect care, unit related activities and personal activities. <br/>RESULTS: All nurses employed on each ward gave consent and were observed in this study (n=92). Age (mean 42, SD 10.2) and gender (male = 8.2%) of nurses within the sample were comparable to State demographics. Total nursing experience ranged from less than 1 year, a new graduate, to 45 years. Experience on the ward under study ranged from less than one year to 15 years. (Note: not able to display table that illustrates an example of the direct care activities documented.) <br/>IMPLICATIONS: What nurses are doing and what they say they are doing can be a telling gap to explore in bringing nurses in closer proximity to patients for safety, to prevent failure to rescue and to build effective nursing surveillance system. RESULTS: This study support that nursing numbers, nurse - patient ratios, qualifications and experience do not alone capture the nuances of the 'way in which nurses work'; what nurses are doing 'at the bedside or beyond'; the way in which they perform 'surveillance' as individuals, as a workgroup and as a unit to facilitate safe patient outcomes. In addition, it is clear that further research is needed to identify what 'effective' surveillance is.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:57:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:57:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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