2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157532
Type:
Presentation
Title:
APPLICATION OF THE NEW MODEL: FATIGUE IN CHRONIC HEART FAILURE PATIENTS
Abstract:
APPLICATION OF THE NEW MODEL: FATIGUE IN CHRONIC HEART FAILURE PATIENTS
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Jones, Jacqueline, RN, PhD, BN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Colorado Denver
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:Campus Box C-288-19 , Education 2 North, 13120 E. 19th Ave., Aurora, CO, 80045, USA
SPECIFIC AIMS: The overall aim of this presentation is to report a secondary analysis to explore the tenets of Symptom Self-Management Model (SSMM) in individuals with heart failure who experience fatigue.
RATIONALE: A secondary analysis of existing qualitative symptom experience data allows for the 'in field' exploration of the emergent SSMM without losing the original intent of the primary study and understandings within the context of chronic heart failure and health care system experiences. (Note: Table display not available.) Categories: The Model Components; Examples of Model Elements; Patient Quote. INPUT (1): Mental Representation of Symptoms; Consequence of fatigue as symptom; It takes a long time to learn, be prepared for everything to take at least twice as long as it used to; it is just a draining experience; It is like somebody coming and putting a 50 lb. weight on your chest. INPUT (2): Emotional States Cultural Group; Frustration r/t lack of cultural understanding of waxing and waning of fatigue; I wish that they (family) could understand. I wish that they did understand when I say IÆm tired; almost like she thinks I'm using it like an excuse.
APPRAISAL: Symptom Appraisal; Recognizing physical sensation as fatigue and its meaning to everyday life; So if you think, oh my heart is bad and it can stop at any time now and you have that on your mind all the time, but yet you are reminded when you take your medicines.
OUTCOME Actions: *Do Something (avoid),*Do nothing; Responding to fatigue with varied action; I go grocery shopping in the morning, I know I'm going to be tired in the afternoon and if I try to push and do anything after I get home I know I'm going to pay extra so I just plan on not planning. OUTCOMES: Fatigue disruptor of everyday life; Fatigue definitely does get in the way. CARE CONTEXT: Provider influence in managing fatigue; I'm just shot when the afternoon rolls around. I even changed primary care physicians here because the one I was seeing only had office hours from 1:00 on.
METHODS: The sample was 23 male and 10 females (n=33) and average of age 61 (49, 75). Semi-structured interviews were conducted with outpatients with symptomatic heart failure. Patients responded to 'what is the most distressing or difficult about having heart failure?' Qualitative theme analysis was applied to the textual data about fatigue and SSMM was then used as an interpretive lens to analyze existing themes and meanings across individual patient narratives. Data analysis also remained open to new and unexpected occurrences beyond the coding.
RESULTS: Patient narrative exemplars (see table) give voice to the reality that symptoms are more than physiological; symptoms are a world both internal and externally experienced. IMPLICATIONS: The SSMM can expand understanding of symptom experience and symptom management in terms of context, the individual's perception, appraisal, interpretation and potential actions.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAPPLICATION OF THE NEW MODEL: FATIGUE IN CHRONIC HEART FAILURE PATIENTSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157532-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">APPLICATION OF THE NEW MODEL: FATIGUE IN CHRONIC HEART FAILURE PATIENTS</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Jones, Jacqueline, RN, PhD, BN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Colorado Denver</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Campus Box C-288-19 , Education 2 North, 13120 E. 19th Ave., Aurora, CO, 80045, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jacqueline.jones@ucdenver.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">SPECIFIC AIMS: The overall aim of this presentation is to report a secondary analysis to explore the tenets of Symptom Self-Management Model (SSMM) in individuals with heart failure who experience fatigue. <br/>RATIONALE: A secondary analysis of existing qualitative symptom experience data allows for the 'in field' exploration of the emergent SSMM without losing the original intent of the primary study and understandings within the context of chronic heart failure and health care system experiences. (Note: Table display not available.) Categories: The Model Components; Examples of Model Elements; Patient Quote. INPUT (1): Mental Representation of Symptoms; Consequence of fatigue as symptom; It takes a long time to learn, be prepared for everything to take at least twice as long as it used to; it is just a draining experience; It is like somebody coming and putting a 50 lb. weight on your chest. INPUT (2): Emotional States Cultural Group; Frustration r/t lack of cultural understanding of waxing and waning of fatigue; I wish that they (family) could understand. I wish that they did understand when I say I&AElig;m tired; almost like she thinks I'm using it like an excuse.<br/>APPRAISAL: Symptom Appraisal; Recognizing physical sensation as fatigue and its meaning to everyday life; So if you think, oh my heart is bad and it can stop at any time now and you have that on your mind all the time, but yet you are reminded when you take your medicines.<br/>OUTCOME Actions: *Do Something (avoid),*Do nothing; Responding to fatigue with varied action; I go grocery shopping in the morning, I know I'm going to be tired in the afternoon and if I try to push and do anything after I get home I know I'm going to pay extra so I just plan on not planning. OUTCOMES: Fatigue disruptor of everyday life; Fatigue definitely does get in the way. CARE CONTEXT: Provider influence in managing fatigue; I'm just shot when the afternoon rolls around. I even changed primary care physicians here because the one I was seeing only had office hours from 1:00 on. <br/>METHODS: The sample was 23 male and 10 females (n=33) and average of age 61 (49, 75). Semi-structured interviews were conducted with outpatients with symptomatic heart failure. Patients responded to 'what is the most distressing or difficult about having heart failure?' Qualitative theme analysis was applied to the textual data about fatigue and SSMM was then used as an interpretive lens to analyze existing themes and meanings across individual patient narratives. Data analysis also remained open to new and unexpected occurrences beyond the coding. <br/>RESULTS: Patient narrative exemplars (see table) give voice to the reality that symptoms are more than physiological; symptoms are a world both internal and externally experienced. IMPLICATIONS: The SSMM can expand understanding of symptom experience and symptom management in terms of context, the individual's perception, appraisal, interpretation and potential actions. <br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:57:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:57:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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