2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157533
Type:
Presentation
Title:
DIETARY INTAKE, BMI AND ACTIVITY LEVELS IN YOUNG ADULT SURVIVORS OF ALL
Abstract:
DIETARY INTAKE, BMI AND ACTIVITY LEVELS IN YOUNG ADULT SURVIVORS OF ALL
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Kass-Wolff, Jane, PhD, FNP-BC
P.I. Institution Name:University of Colorado Denver
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:13190 E. 19th Avenue, Mail stop 288-18, P.O. Box 6511, Office number 4231, Aurora, CO, 80016, USA
PURPOSE: To compare dietary intake, body mass intake (BMI) and physical activity levels of young adult survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with a control group of young adults without ALL.
BACKGROUND: Survival after diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has improved significantly with new treatment regimens. Long-term follow-up of survivors indicates significant long-term effects leading to chronic health problems. Obesity is a significant problem in the young adult survivors of ALL. Factors leading to obesity in the general population include lack of exercise and increased caloric intake from fats and carbohydrates. It is unclear whether weight gain in ALL survivors is due to lack of exercise, increased caloric intake or other causes including their treatment.
PARTICIPANTS: A convenience sample of young adult ALL survivors' ages 18 - 30 years was recruited through a database of survivors being followed in a young adult survivor clinic in a large city in the south. Twenty-eight survivors were recruited (14 male and 14 female) with an mean age of 22 years (SD +/- 2.4). Mean age at diagnosis of ALL for survivors was 7 years of age. Each survivor was asked to invite a friend of same age and sex who had no chronic health problems or history of cancer. Twenty friends were recruited, 8 males and 12 females (M = 22.10 years, SD +/- 2.56) for a total of 48 participants.
METHODS: Dietary intake of all participants was collected using the long Willett Food Frequency Questionnaire (WFFQ) consisting of questions relating to frequency and amounts of various types of foods ingested in the past month. The modifiable activity questionnaire (MAQ) assessed work and leisure activities and number hours of sleep. Demographic and anthropometric data was collected including height and weight and body mass index was then calculated. Questionnaires were administered on a one-time basis after the consent was signed. ANOVA and t-tests were used to compare differences between and within the groups.
RESULTS: Calcium intake in both males and females was below the 1500 mg recommended daily intake. Average intake of males both survivors and controls was 1000 mg daily while intake for females was 880 mg per day. Differences in BMI was not statistically significant between survivors and controls, although female controls had an average BMI of 26.0 versus that in the survivors which was 21. Additional RESULTS: will be discussed including implications for clinical practice.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDIETARY INTAKE, BMI AND ACTIVITY LEVELS IN YOUNG ADULT SURVIVORS OF ALLen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157533-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">DIETARY INTAKE, BMI AND ACTIVITY LEVELS IN YOUNG ADULT SURVIVORS OF ALL</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kass-Wolff, Jane, PhD, FNP-BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Colorado Denver</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">13190 E. 19th Avenue, Mail stop 288-18, P.O. Box 6511, Office number 4231, Aurora, CO, 80016, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jane.kass-wolff@ucdenver.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE: To compare dietary intake, body mass intake (BMI) and physical activity levels of young adult survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with a control group of young adults without ALL.<br/> BACKGROUND: Survival after diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has improved significantly with new treatment regimens. Long-term follow-up of survivors indicates significant long-term effects leading to chronic health problems. Obesity is a significant problem in the young adult survivors of ALL. Factors leading to obesity in the general population include lack of exercise and increased caloric intake from fats and carbohydrates. It is unclear whether weight gain in ALL survivors is due to lack of exercise, increased caloric intake or other causes including their treatment.<br/> PARTICIPANTS: A convenience sample of young adult ALL survivors' ages 18 - 30 years was recruited through a database of survivors being followed in a young adult survivor clinic in a large city in the south. Twenty-eight survivors were recruited (14 male and 14 female) with an mean age of 22 years (SD +/- 2.4). Mean age at diagnosis of ALL for survivors was 7 years of age. Each survivor was asked to invite a friend of same age and sex who had no chronic health problems or history of cancer. Twenty friends were recruited, 8 males and 12 females (M = 22.10 years, SD +/- 2.56) for a total of 48 participants.<br/> METHODS: Dietary intake of all participants was collected using the long Willett Food Frequency Questionnaire (WFFQ) consisting of questions relating to frequency and amounts of various types of foods ingested in the past month. The modifiable activity questionnaire (MAQ) assessed work and leisure activities and number hours of sleep. Demographic and anthropometric data was collected including height and weight and body mass index was then calculated. Questionnaires were administered on a one-time basis after the consent was signed. ANOVA and t-tests were used to compare differences between and within the groups.<br/> RESULTS: Calcium intake in both males and females was below the 1500 mg recommended daily intake. Average intake of males both survivors and controls was 1000 mg daily while intake for females was 880 mg per day. Differences in BMI was not statistically significant between survivors and controls, although female controls had an average BMI of 26.0 versus that in the survivors which was 21. Additional RESULTS: will be discussed including implications for clinical practice. <br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:57:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:57:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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