2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157534
Type:
Presentation
Title:
AI/AN NURSE PRACTITIONERS AND CBPR PARTNERSHIP TO PROMOTE ADOLESCENT HEALTH
Abstract:
AI/AN NURSE PRACTITIONERS AND CBPR PARTNERSHIP TO PROMOTE ADOLESCENT HEALTH
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Katz, Janet R., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Washington State University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:923 west 24th avenue, Spokane, WA, 99203, USA
Co-Authors:Robbie Paul; Teressa Martinez
PURPOSE/AIMS: The purpose of this paper is to present the RESULTS: of a partnership between university researchers and an AI/AN family nurse practitioner (FNP) working on her reservation to write a research grant to the Indian Health Service and National Institutes of Health. The first step of the grant's development is described here as we conducted a research project to determine community priorities for adolescent health and analyzed the data using a community advisory board (CAB). Implications and recommendations for community nurse partnerships are also explored.
BACKGROUND: Developing research grants with sovereign tribal communities requires special attention to culture. American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) leaders recommend using a community based participatory research (CBPR) approach to respect and recognize tribal self- determination. CBPR literature describes how to develop research grants, including relationship building between academics and communities, forming community advisory boards, identifying issues of community concern, and implementing, analyzing, and disseminating research. Yet, no information is available about CBPR partnerships with community nurse practitioners.
METHODS: This project used focus groups to determine the primary community concern for adolescent health and to form a CAB to analyze data and determine research questions. A descriptive qualitative analysis method with focus groups was chosen to efficiently elicit in-depth community members concerns about adolescent health on the reservation. The FNP was responsible for arranging the focus groups to meet with as many groups as possible in order to be inclusive. Cultural sensitivity mandated including a variety of groups to show respect, gain a variety of perspectives, give voice to those who might not otherwise be heard, and acknowledge awareness of a concept called "tribal politics." Data analysis was conducted by the FNP, university researchers, and the CAB. Each step was first approved by the Tribal Council.
RESULTS: Thirteen focus groups with 85 participants ranging in age from 12 to 99 years old were held of in the last two months of 2008. Three of the 13 groups were with adolescents between the ages of 12 and 18 years who attended middle school, high school, or alternative school. Alcohol and drugs was identified as the primary health concern. IMPLICATIONS: This study contributes to the CBPR literature by illustrating the importance and IMPLICATIONS: of partnering with community nurse practitioners.
IMPLICATIONS: for the FNP included conflicts or disagreements with research participant's perspectives during data collection or analysis and limited time to work on research. A major implication is maintaining confidentiality and participation in small communities. Locally, study RESULTS: will help continued research efforts with this tribe and increased community and researcher capacity for work with other tribes. Nationally, strategies for successful research with tribes, including understanding how AI/AN nurses contribute to research, have been developed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAI/AN NURSE PRACTITIONERS AND CBPR PARTNERSHIP TO PROMOTE ADOLESCENT HEALTHen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157534-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">AI/AN NURSE PRACTITIONERS AND CBPR PARTNERSHIP TO PROMOTE ADOLESCENT HEALTH</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Katz, Janet R., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Washington State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">923 west 24th avenue, Spokane, WA, 99203, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jkatz@wsu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Robbie Paul; Teressa Martinez</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE/AIMS: The purpose of this paper is to present the RESULTS: of a partnership between university researchers and an AI/AN family nurse practitioner (FNP) working on her reservation to write a research grant to the Indian Health Service and National Institutes of Health. The first step of the grant's development is described here as we conducted a research project to determine community priorities for adolescent health and analyzed the data using a community advisory board (CAB). Implications and recommendations for community nurse partnerships are also explored. <br/>BACKGROUND: Developing research grants with sovereign tribal communities requires special attention to culture. American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) leaders recommend using a community based participatory research (CBPR) approach to respect and recognize tribal self- determination. CBPR literature describes how to develop research grants, including relationship building between academics and communities, forming community advisory boards, identifying issues of community concern, and implementing, analyzing, and disseminating research. Yet, no information is available about CBPR partnerships with community nurse practitioners. <br/>METHODS: This project used focus groups to determine the primary community concern for adolescent health and to form a CAB to analyze data and determine research questions. A descriptive qualitative analysis method with focus groups was chosen to efficiently elicit in-depth community members concerns about adolescent health on the reservation. The FNP was responsible for arranging the focus groups to meet with as many groups as possible in order to be inclusive. Cultural sensitivity mandated including a variety of groups to show respect, gain a variety of perspectives, give voice to those who might not otherwise be heard, and acknowledge awareness of a concept called &quot;tribal politics.&quot; Data analysis was conducted by the FNP, university researchers, and the CAB. Each step was first approved by the Tribal Council. <br/>RESULTS: Thirteen focus groups with 85 participants ranging in age from 12 to 99 years old were held of in the last two months of 2008. Three of the 13 groups were with adolescents between the ages of 12 and 18 years who attended middle school, high school, or alternative school. Alcohol and drugs was identified as the primary health concern. IMPLICATIONS: This study contributes to the CBPR literature by illustrating the importance and IMPLICATIONS: of partnering with community nurse practitioners. <br/>IMPLICATIONS: for the FNP included conflicts or disagreements with research participant's perspectives during data collection or analysis and limited time to work on research. A major implication is maintaining confidentiality and participation in small communities. Locally, study RESULTS: will help continued research efforts with this tribe and increased community and researcher capacity for work with other tribes. Nationally, strategies for successful research with tribes, including understanding how AI/AN nurses contribute to research, have been developed. <br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:57:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:57:41Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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