NURSING SURVEILLANCE IN THE ACUTE CARE MED-SURG ENVIRONMENT: LATENT VARIABLE ANALYSIS

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157535
Type:
Presentation
Title:
NURSING SURVEILLANCE IN THE ACUTE CARE MED-SURG ENVIRONMENT: LATENT VARIABLE ANALYSIS
Abstract:
NURSING SURVEILLANCE IN THE ACUTE CARE MED-SURG ENVIRONMENT: LATENT VARIABLE ANALYSIS
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Kelly, Lesly, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Pennsylvania
Title:Postdoctoral Research Fellow
Contact Address:500 Admirals Way #201, Philadelphia, PA, 19146, USA
PURPOSE/AIMS: The purpose of this research is to define, analyze, and measure the concept of nursing surveillance in medical-surgical nurses in the acute care setting.
BACKGROUND: Nursing care has previously been described with terms such as observing, monitoring, and critical thinking. In both the clinical and research environments, nursing surveillance is an emerging term being used to describe the evolving, complex, and autonomous care nurses provide today, yet little research has been done to examine the concept, how it is measured, and its role in outcomes.
METHODS: This study used a descriptive design to survey nurse's perception on the dimensions of nursing surveillance. Literature review was used to identify the attributes of nursing surveillance, which includes: activities, expertise, early recognition skills, intuition, and decision making. The Nursing Surveillance Survey was created and consisted of four existing instruments measuring expertise, early recognition, intuition, and decision making, and one new instrument measuring activities associated with nursing surveillance. A content review panel was used to develop the new Nursing Surveillance Activities Scale. A sample of 158 medical-surgical nurses participated in completing the full Nursing Surveillance Survey.
RESULTS: Factor analysis was used to analyze each of the five instrument's items and total representation of the surveillance concept. The instruments performed adequately in psychometric testing, and modifications were made so composite development could be achieved. The dimensions were factored as a composite variable and four of the five dimensions loaded onto a single factor, while the activities dimensions loaded separately. These RESULTS: can be explained through a theoretical difference between the dimensions, or through limitations with the newly created Nursing Surveillance Activities Scale.
IMPLICATIONS: This study identified a relationship between the four cognitive dimensions of nursing surveillance and their representation of the variable. This early research into measuring the dimensions of nursing surveillance identifies that the complex, multidimensional nature of the concept. Future research in nursing surveillance should account for the multiple dimensions of this concept and focus on the combination of both the cognitive and behavioral processes involved in order to fully represent nursing surveillance.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNURSING SURVEILLANCE IN THE ACUTE CARE MED-SURG ENVIRONMENT: LATENT VARIABLE ANALYSISen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157535-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">NURSING SURVEILLANCE IN THE ACUTE CARE MED-SURG ENVIRONMENT: LATENT VARIABLE ANALYSIS</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kelly, Lesly, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Pennsylvania</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Postdoctoral Research Fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">500 Admirals Way #201, Philadelphia, PA, 19146, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">leslyk@nursing.upenn.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE/AIMS: The purpose of this research is to define, analyze, and measure the concept of nursing surveillance in medical-surgical nurses in the acute care setting.<br/>BACKGROUND: Nursing care has previously been described with terms such as observing, monitoring, and critical thinking. In both the clinical and research environments, nursing surveillance is an emerging term being used to describe the evolving, complex, and autonomous care nurses provide today, yet little research has been done to examine the concept, how it is measured, and its role in outcomes.<br/>METHODS: This study used a descriptive design to survey nurse's perception on the dimensions of nursing surveillance. Literature review was used to identify the attributes of nursing surveillance, which includes: activities, expertise, early recognition skills, intuition, and decision making. The Nursing Surveillance Survey was created and consisted of four existing instruments measuring expertise, early recognition, intuition, and decision making, and one new instrument measuring activities associated with nursing surveillance. A content review panel was used to develop the new Nursing Surveillance Activities Scale. A sample of 158 medical-surgical nurses participated in completing the full Nursing Surveillance Survey.<br/>RESULTS: Factor analysis was used to analyze each of the five instrument's items and total representation of the surveillance concept. The instruments performed adequately in psychometric testing, and modifications were made so composite development could be achieved. The dimensions were factored as a composite variable and four of the five dimensions loaded onto a single factor, while the activities dimensions loaded separately. These RESULTS: can be explained through a theoretical difference between the dimensions, or through limitations with the newly created Nursing Surveillance Activities Scale.<br/>IMPLICATIONS: This study identified a relationship between the four cognitive dimensions of nursing surveillance and their representation of the variable. This early research into measuring the dimensions of nursing surveillance identifies that the complex, multidimensional nature of the concept. Future research in nursing surveillance should account for the multiple dimensions of this concept and focus on the combination of both the cognitive and behavioral processes involved in order to fully represent nursing surveillance.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:57:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:57:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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