IMPACT OF SPIRITUALITY AND RELIGION TOWARD DEATH AND DYING AMONG KOREAN SENIORS

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157536
Type:
Presentation
Title:
IMPACT OF SPIRITUALITY AND RELIGION TOWARD DEATH AND DYING AMONG KOREAN SENIORS
Abstract:
IMPACT OF SPIRITUALITY AND RELIGION TOWARD DEATH AND DYING AMONG KOREAN SENIORS
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Kim, Heewon, Ph.D.
P.I. Institution Name:Johns Hopkins University
Title:Social Work
Contact Address:525, N Wrolfe st, Baltimore, MD, 21205, USA
PURPOSES/AIMS: The purpose of this study was to examine the attitudes the Korean elderly have toward death and dying as they relate to spirituality and religion (beliefs and practice). This research explored how Korean seniors handled death and dying, and how spirituality and religion affected their attitudes and coping toward aging and other serious ôend of lifeö issues.
RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: The study was guided by following theoretical assumptions: (1) resilience is strengthened by spirituality and religion in coping with stresses associated with death, dying, and other life-threatening crises, (2) positive attitudes toward life and death are associated with strong adherence to oneÆs faith, health status, and ego-integrity, (3) the differences in beliefs toward life after death correlate with differences in death anxiety, (4) spirituality encompasses a variety of cultural, religious, and personal interpretations in oneÆs meaning-making processes toward the end of life and afterlife.
METHODS: The transcendental phenomenological research method was used to describe the lived experiences of and to uncover the effect of the Korean American elderly experience of spirituality and religion on death and dying. Phenomenology seeks to uncover meaning of existence rather than theorizing about what exists. This approach embodies a respect for persons, the primacy of their experiences over explanation or presupposition, the process of uncovering meaning relevant to their experiences, and a structure that embodies the subjective/OBJECTIVE: unity of experience. A theoretical sampling was used to create a sample that best elucidated the phenomenon. The interviews were conducted in Korean in a mutually convenient setting. Thematic Analysis was conducted with a systematic procedure for identifying significant statements in the database from participants; statements were then clustered into meaning units and theme stating.
RESULTS: A total of 15 American seniors aged 65 and over lived in Chicago: 6 Christians, 5 Buddhists, and 5 with no religious preference. The summary of the study findings were : (1) Spirituality and religion have a positive impact on coping with stress associated with life-threatening crises; (2) People with positive attitudes have strong ego-integrity and improved physical and mental health; (3) Elderly individuals have lower death anxiety than middle aged individuals , especially when they have religion, believe in the afterlife and have completed their life tasks; and (4) Culturally, many Korean seniors still adhere to traditional Korean burial customs even when these customs conflict with their current religious beliefs and furthermore they do not expect their children to carry on these traditions.
IMPLICATIONS: The findings of this study have a few clinical implications. It is essential for health care professionals to better understand these different values and beliefs of individuals in terms of death and dying shaped by different religious and cultural backgrounds. The findings of this study also call for careful evaluation of the complex interplay that exists within spirituality, religion and ethnic culture in coping with death and dying.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIMPACT OF SPIRITUALITY AND RELIGION TOWARD DEATH AND DYING AMONG KOREAN SENIORSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157536-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">IMPACT OF SPIRITUALITY AND RELIGION TOWARD DEATH AND DYING AMONG KOREAN SENIORS</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kim, Heewon, Ph.D.</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Johns Hopkins University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Social Work</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">525, N Wrolfe st, Baltimore, MD, 21205, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hkim150@son.jhmi.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS: The purpose of this study was to examine the attitudes the Korean elderly have toward death and dying as they relate to spirituality and religion (beliefs and practice). This research explored how Korean seniors handled death and dying, and how spirituality and religion affected their attitudes and coping toward aging and other serious &ocirc;end of life&ouml; issues. <br/>RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: The study was guided by following theoretical assumptions: (1) resilience is strengthened by spirituality and religion in coping with stresses associated with death, dying, and other life-threatening crises, (2) positive attitudes toward life and death are associated with strong adherence to one&AElig;s faith, health status, and ego-integrity, (3) the differences in beliefs toward life after death correlate with differences in death anxiety, (4) spirituality encompasses a variety of cultural, religious, and personal interpretations in one&AElig;s meaning-making processes toward the end of life and afterlife.<br/>METHODS: The transcendental phenomenological research method was used to describe the lived experiences of and to uncover the effect of the Korean American elderly experience of spirituality and religion on death and dying. Phenomenology seeks to uncover meaning of existence rather than theorizing about what exists. This approach embodies a respect for persons, the primacy of their experiences over explanation or presupposition, the process of uncovering meaning relevant to their experiences, and a structure that embodies the subjective/OBJECTIVE: unity of experience. A theoretical sampling was used to create a sample that best elucidated the phenomenon. The interviews were conducted in Korean in a mutually convenient setting. Thematic Analysis was conducted with a systematic procedure for identifying significant statements in the database from participants; statements were then clustered into meaning units and theme stating. <br/> RESULTS: A total of 15 American seniors aged 65 and over lived in Chicago: 6 Christians, 5 Buddhists, and 5 with no religious preference. The summary of the study findings were : (1) Spirituality and religion have a positive impact on coping with stress associated with life-threatening crises; (2) People with positive attitudes have strong ego-integrity and improved physical and mental health; (3) Elderly individuals have lower death anxiety than middle aged individuals , especially when they have religion, believe in the afterlife and have completed their life tasks; and (4) Culturally, many Korean seniors still adhere to traditional Korean burial customs even when these customs conflict with their current religious beliefs and furthermore they do not expect their children to carry on these traditions.<br/>IMPLICATIONS: The findings of this study have a few clinical implications. It is essential for health care professionals to better understand these different values and beliefs of individuals in terms of death and dying shaped by different religious and cultural backgrounds. The findings of this study also call for careful evaluation of the complex interplay that exists within spirituality, religion and ethnic culture in coping with death and dying.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:57:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:57:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.