2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157537
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A GLOBAL MEASURE OF MOTIVATION IS RELATED TO EXERCISE PERFORMANCE
Abstract:
A GLOBAL MEASURE OF MOTIVATION IS RELATED TO EXERCISE PERFORMANCE
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Kitchen, Chuck, MA, FAACVPR
P.I. Institution Name:Havasu Regional Medical Center
Title:Cardiac & Pulmonary Rehabilitation Supervisor
Contact Address:101 Civic Center Lane, Lake Havasu City, AZ, 86403, USA
Co-Authors:Bonnie Fahy; Amy H. T. Davis
INTRODUCTION: Regular exercise reduces morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases. Motivation is presumed important for behaviors, but few have studied motivation and exercise performance.
PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between motivation and exercise performance in subjects with lung disease recruited from community medical practices.
DESIGN: This was a prospective correlational study.
METHODS: All subjects had to be able to walk unassisted on a flat surface and have no contraindications for exercise. Spirometry, medical history, and current medication lists were reviewed. Exercise performance was measured by six-minute walk tests (2). Subjects walked in-doors, in a straight and flat hallway (100 feet, with markings every 10 feet) at their own pace. A 30-minute rest period separated the two six-minute walks. Global motivation was measured by a self-report questionnaire, the Self-Motivation Inventory. The questionnaire has 40 items (five-point Likert format), and an internal consistency of 0.91. Descriptive statistics and Pearson correlations were used to describe the sample and to test the relationship between motivation and exercise performance.
RESULTS: The sample included 45 subjects (mean age 71 +/- 8.7; 24 women and 21 men). All of the subjects had chronic airflow obstruction (mean FEV1/FEV= 53), and of these, 49% also had evidence of coronary artery diseases based on their medical history and medication lists. There was a significant correlation (r=.40; p=.009) between motivation (mean score 4.26 + .69) and average distance walked (1297.37 ft + 334.71).
CONCLUSIONS: People who reported higher global motivation had better exercise performance. A better understanding of the mechanisms of motivation might be useful to design future interventions to improved exercise performance, and ultimately maintenance of exercise across the lifetime.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA GLOBAL MEASURE OF MOTIVATION IS RELATED TO EXERCISE PERFORMANCEen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157537-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A GLOBAL MEASURE OF MOTIVATION IS RELATED TO EXERCISE PERFORMANCE</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kitchen, Chuck, MA, FAACVPR</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Havasu Regional Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Cardiac &amp; Pulmonary Rehabilitation Supervisor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">101 Civic Center Lane, Lake Havasu City, AZ, 86403, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">charles.kitchen@lpnt.net</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Bonnie Fahy; Amy H. T. Davis</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">INTRODUCTION: Regular exercise reduces morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases. Motivation is presumed important for behaviors, but few have studied motivation and exercise performance. <br/>PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between motivation and exercise performance in subjects with lung disease recruited from community medical practices. <br/>DESIGN: This was a prospective correlational study. <br/>METHODS: All subjects had to be able to walk unassisted on a flat surface and have no contraindications for exercise. Spirometry, medical history, and current medication lists were reviewed. Exercise performance was measured by six-minute walk tests (2). Subjects walked in-doors, in a straight and flat hallway (100 feet, with markings every 10 feet) at their own pace. A 30-minute rest period separated the two six-minute walks. Global motivation was measured by a self-report questionnaire, the Self-Motivation Inventory. The questionnaire has 40 items (five-point Likert format), and an internal consistency of 0.91. Descriptive statistics and Pearson correlations were used to describe the sample and to test the relationship between motivation and exercise performance. <br/>RESULTS: The sample included 45 subjects (mean age 71 +/- 8.7; 24 women and 21 men). All of the subjects had chronic airflow obstruction (mean FEV1/FEV= 53), and of these, 49% also had evidence of coronary artery diseases based on their medical history and medication lists. There was a significant correlation (r=.40; p=.009) between motivation (mean score 4.26 + .69) and average distance walked (1297.37 ft + 334.71).<br/>CONCLUSIONS: People who reported higher global motivation had better exercise performance. A better understanding of the mechanisms of motivation might be useful to design future interventions to improved exercise performance, and ultimately maintenance of exercise across the lifetime.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:57:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:57:51Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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