2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157539
Type:
Presentation
Title:
SLEEP, OBESITY, PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, AND INSULIN RESISTANCE IN ADOLESCENTS
Abstract:
SLEEP, OBESITY, PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, AND INSULIN RESISTANCE IN ADOLESCENTS
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Landis, Andrea M., PhD, RN, FNP-BC
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington
Title:Post Doctoral Fellow
Contact Address:School of Nursing, Box 357266, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA
Co-Authors:Eleanor Bond
BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: Diabetes mellitus (type 2) and its intermediate metabolic traits such as insulin resistance are increasingly prevalent among adolescents, likely due at least in part to increasing body weight among teens. Body mass index (BMI) is directly correlated with caloric intake and inversely correlated with physical activity and total sleep time (TST). It is not clear whether TST is associated with caloric intake, physical activity, or metabolic traits such as insulin resistance. The purpose of this study is to explore the associations between TST and insulin resistance, physical activity, and BMI in adolescents of varying BMI.
METHODS: Subjects, aged 12 to 18 years were recruited from the community. Subjects completed questionnaires regarding demographic characteristics, pubertal status (self-rated), and the Physical Activity Questionnaire for Adolescents. Weight and height were measured and fasting (> 8 hours) blood was assayed for serum insulin and glucose. Insulin resistance (homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance; HOMA-IR) was calculated as fasting serum insulin (micronU/ml) + fasting serum glucose (mg/dL)/405. Subjects wore a wrist actigraph for 8 consecutive nights to measure TST. Descriptive and parametric procedures were used for data analyses (alpha = .05). RESULTS: The sample (n = 30) included 56.7% (17) females, 76.7% (23) White adolescents. The mean age was 15.7 +/- 2.0 years. Mean BMI was 24.4 +/- 5.4 kg/m2 (range 15.0 û 37.7 kg/m2), with 40% being obese or overweight. Mean fasting serum glucose and insulin levels were (94.4 +/- 6.4 mg/dL and 8.5 +/- 5.0 micron U/mL), respectively. All fasting glucose levels were in the nondiabetic range. Mean HOMA-IR was 1.96 +/- 1.1. Mean nocturnal TST was 420 +/- 32 minutes (7.0 +/- 0.5 hours) per night, less than the 8.5 - 9.25 hours recommended for this age group. Controlling for age, gender, and puberty, insulin resistance was significantly associated with higher BMI (r = .72, p<.001) and decreased physical activity (r = -.41, p=.03). TST was not associated with BMI, insulin resistance, nor physical activity.
IMPLICATIONS: Collectively, the sample was sleep deprived. Physical activity was inversely associated with insulin resistance, independent of potential confounders. Although TST was not linked with variables targeted in this study, it could happen that future longitudinal studies, measuring caloric intake and refining measures of physical activity such as using an accelerometer in a larger sample are needed to better understand how sleep may affect markers for metabolic risk, diet, and physical activity that potentially lead to obesity in adolescents.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSLEEP, OBESITY, PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, AND INSULIN RESISTANCE IN ADOLESCENTSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157539-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">SLEEP, OBESITY, PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, AND INSULIN RESISTANCE IN ADOLESCENTS</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Landis, Andrea M., PhD, RN, FNP-BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Post Doctoral Fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, Box 357266, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">amlandis@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Eleanor Bond</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: Diabetes mellitus (type 2) and its intermediate metabolic traits such as insulin resistance are increasingly prevalent among adolescents, likely due at least in part to increasing body weight among teens. Body mass index (BMI) is directly correlated with caloric intake and inversely correlated with physical activity and total sleep time (TST). It is not clear whether TST is associated with caloric intake, physical activity, or metabolic traits such as insulin resistance. The purpose of this study is to explore the associations between TST and insulin resistance, physical activity, and BMI in adolescents of varying BMI. <br/>METHODS: Subjects, aged 12 to 18 years were recruited from the community. Subjects completed questionnaires regarding demographic characteristics, pubertal status (self-rated), and the Physical Activity Questionnaire for Adolescents. Weight and height were measured and fasting (&gt; 8 hours) blood was assayed for serum insulin and glucose. Insulin resistance (homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance; HOMA-IR) was calculated as fasting serum insulin (micronU/ml) + fasting serum glucose (mg/dL)/405. Subjects wore a wrist actigraph for 8 consecutive nights to measure TST. Descriptive and parametric procedures were used for data analyses (alpha = .05). RESULTS: The sample (n = 30) included 56.7% (17) females, 76.7% (23) White adolescents. The mean age was 15.7 +/- 2.0 years. Mean BMI was 24.4 +/- 5.4 kg/m2 (range 15.0 &ucirc; 37.7 kg/m2), with 40% being obese or overweight. Mean fasting serum glucose and insulin levels were (94.4 +/- 6.4 mg/dL and 8.5 +/- 5.0 micron U/mL), respectively. All fasting glucose levels were in the nondiabetic range. Mean HOMA-IR was 1.96 +/- 1.1. Mean nocturnal TST was 420 +/- 32 minutes (7.0 +/- 0.5 hours) per night, less than the 8.5 - 9.25 hours recommended for this age group. Controlling for age, gender, and puberty, insulin resistance was significantly associated with higher BMI (r = .72, p&lt;.001) and decreased physical activity (r = -.41, p=.03). TST was not associated with BMI, insulin resistance, nor physical activity.<br/> IMPLICATIONS: Collectively, the sample was sleep deprived. Physical activity was inversely associated with insulin resistance, independent of potential confounders. Although TST was not linked with variables targeted in this study, it could happen that future longitudinal studies, measuring caloric intake and refining measures of physical activity such as using an accelerometer in a larger sample are needed to better understand how sleep may affect markers for metabolic risk, diet, and physical activity that potentially lead to obesity in adolescents.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:57:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:57:58Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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