2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157540
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A MODEL OF EFFECTS OF NARRATIVE AS CULTURE-CENTRIC HEALTH PROMOTION
Abstract:
A MODEL OF EFFECTS OF NARRATIVE AS CULTURE-CENTRIC HEALTH PROMOTION
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Larkey, Linda K., PhD, CRTT
P.I. Institution Name:Arizona State University
Title:Professor
Contact Address:500 N. 3rd Street, Phoenix, AZ, 85004, USA
Co-Authors:Michael Hecht
PURPOSES/AIMS: Narrative approaches to health promotion have recently gained much attention. Cultural grounding of health messages is a particularly well-matched goal of narrative-based health promotion. We will introduce a model for culture-centric narratives in health promotion, share practical applications of the model in our cancer prevention and control research, and propose an agenda for engaging participants in application and further testing.
RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: Cultural narratives have successfully incorporated values in a range of health promotion contexts, often working directly with members of a cultural group to obtain within-culture viewpoints and compelling stories. For example, teen narratives have been used to create MTV videos depicting drug resistance communication strategies that model the behavior of just saying "no". Similarly, stories drawn from cultural group members have been used to create dramatic appeal in messages designed to encourage preventive behaviors such as colorectal cancer screening among Latinos. These METHODS: are narrowing the gap between creative advertising media and public health promotion strategies, but rarely are theories or models proposed to manage how such campaigns are developed and tested.
METHODS: The model: The model begins with defining characteristics of narratives identified in entertainment-education research to be critical, including character, story elements, and for specific culture-related applications, cultural embeddedness. These elements are presented and discussed as influencing health self-concept, involvement/transportation in and identification with characters and events in the story, and likelihood to engage in vicarious or real rehearsal and social interaction to support targeted health behaviors. These factors are predicted, in turn, to persuade and create intentions to change the desired health behavior, especially when sociocultural norms are projected.
The investigator will present applications from current research, sharing how stories are collected from special populations to obtain cultural representativeness, how to retain cultural fidelity when shaped into narrative curriculum/messages, and various ways to test mediators and RESULTS:. In addition to general health promotion applications, potential for use in cancer supportive care/therapeutic settings will be discussed.
RESULTS: Current research that examines the elements and mediator of the model will be discussed. Two major criteria are requisite for narratives or storytelling: narrative characteristics or message features and engaging characters. Both the emotional connection (i.e., empathy and liking) and the perceived similarity of characters have been suggested as central to the persuasive effects of role models. These factors, in turn, create a sense of identification and transport the listener into the story, increasing the likelihood of adoption of the promoted behaviors.
IMPLICATIONS: Participants will have an opportunity to evaluate their work with culturally diverse populations in community settings, discuss their efforts, and plan new ways to develop culturally grounded messages to promote health messages. Creative applications and further develop the concepts and application of the model will be discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA MODEL OF EFFECTS OF NARRATIVE AS CULTURE-CENTRIC HEALTH PROMOTIONen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157540-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A MODEL OF EFFECTS OF NARRATIVE AS CULTURE-CENTRIC HEALTH PROMOTION</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Larkey, Linda K., PhD, CRTT</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arizona State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">500 N. 3rd Street, Phoenix, AZ, 85004, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">larkeylite@msn.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Michael Hecht</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS: Narrative approaches to health promotion have recently gained much attention. Cultural grounding of health messages is a particularly well-matched goal of narrative-based health promotion. We will introduce a model for culture-centric narratives in health promotion, share practical applications of the model in our cancer prevention and control research, and propose an agenda for engaging participants in application and further testing. <br/>RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: Cultural narratives have successfully incorporated values in a range of health promotion contexts, often working directly with members of a cultural group to obtain within-culture viewpoints and compelling stories. For example, teen narratives have been used to create MTV videos depicting drug resistance communication strategies that model the behavior of just saying &quot;no&quot;. Similarly, stories drawn from cultural group members have been used to create dramatic appeal in messages designed to encourage preventive behaviors such as colorectal cancer screening among Latinos. These METHODS: are narrowing the gap between creative advertising media and public health promotion strategies, but rarely are theories or models proposed to manage how such campaigns are developed and tested. <br/>METHODS: The model: The model begins with defining characteristics of narratives identified in entertainment-education research to be critical, including character, story elements, and for specific culture-related applications, cultural embeddedness. These elements are presented and discussed as influencing health self-concept, involvement/transportation in and identification with characters and events in the story, and likelihood to engage in vicarious or real rehearsal and social interaction to support targeted health behaviors. These factors are predicted, in turn, to persuade and create intentions to change the desired health behavior, especially when sociocultural norms are projected.<br/>The investigator will present applications from current research, sharing how stories are collected from special populations to obtain cultural representativeness, how to retain cultural fidelity when shaped into narrative curriculum/messages, and various ways to test mediators and RESULTS:. In addition to general health promotion applications, potential for use in cancer supportive care/therapeutic settings will be discussed. <br/>RESULTS: Current research that examines the elements and mediator of the model will be discussed. Two major criteria are requisite for narratives or storytelling: narrative characteristics or message features and engaging characters. Both the emotional connection (i.e., empathy and liking) and the perceived similarity of characters have been suggested as central to the persuasive effects of role models. These factors, in turn, create a sense of identification and transport the listener into the story, increasing the likelihood of adoption of the promoted behaviors. <br/>IMPLICATIONS: Participants will have an opportunity to evaluate their work with culturally diverse populations in community settings, discuss their efforts, and plan new ways to develop culturally grounded messages to promote health messages. Creative applications and further develop the concepts and application of the model will be discussed. <br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:58:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:58:01Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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