EVALUATION OF GALLATIN COUNTY'S LOW-COST RADON TEST-KIT PROGRAM THROUGH A NURSING LENS

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157541
Type:
Presentation
Title:
EVALUATION OF GALLATIN COUNTY'S LOW-COST RADON TEST-KIT PROGRAM THROUGH A NURSING LENS
Abstract:
EVALUATION OF GALLATIN COUNTY'S LOW-COST RADON TEST-KIT PROGRAM THROUGH A NURSING LENS
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Larsson, Laura S., PhD, MPH, BS
P.I. Institution Name:Montana State University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:214 Sherrick Hall, Bozeman, MT, 59717, USA
PURPOSES/AIMS:
Montana Department of Environmental Quality contracts with Gallatin County to provide low-cost, radon test kits through the environmental services wing of the Gallatin City-County Health Department (GCCHD). This study explored psychometric, sociodemographic, and housing variables for participants in Gallatin County's Low-Cost Radon Test Kit Program (RP) during 2009.
RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND:
Gallatin County has a Zone 1 EPA radon designation, yet research suggests only 10% of low-income Gallatin County families with children have tested their homes. Outreach efforts to increase radon testing, particularly among vulnerable sub-populations, should be guided by careful assessment of current knowledge and testing behavior.
METHODS:
Survey data were collected from program participants (n = 34). Only RP participants who identified themselves as members of a household to be tested for radon were invited to complete the survey. A $15 department store gift card was given as a token of appreciation.
RESULTS:
Participation in the survey was positive (80.9 %). The majority of RP participants were home owners (n = 30, 88.2%). The average age was approximately 47 years (n = 22, x = 46.82, sd = 16.45, range 23-85) with one child in the home. The average combined household income bracket was $50,000 to $59,999. The average education level was graduation from a 2-year degree program or similar level. Most (n = 23, 67.1%) had tested their homes for radon before. Twenty respondents (58%) had tested prior residences as well. Nearly all participants (n = 32, 91%) had heard of the health effects of radon. Results of the psychometric findings similarly suggest that program participants do not meet traditional definitions of health disparate sub-populations. Ten out of 21 participants (61.8%) who completed testing had indoor radon concentrations greater than or equal to 4 picoCuries per liter. These data confirm Gallatin County's Zone 1 risk designation.
IMPLICATIONS:
The most important finding of this study is that the RP is not reaching the underserved. Formal RP goals should be established for participation rates by: families who rent their homes, families eligible for other health-department programs, and those who are first-time testers. In addition, these study RESULTS: provide the rationale for integrating the agendas of the environmental services and public health nursing specialties in rural, health departments.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEVALUATION OF GALLATIN COUNTY'S LOW-COST RADON TEST-KIT PROGRAM THROUGH A NURSING LENSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157541-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">EVALUATION OF GALLATIN COUNTY'S LOW-COST RADON TEST-KIT PROGRAM THROUGH A NURSING LENS</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Larsson, Laura S., PhD, MPH, BS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Montana State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">214 Sherrick Hall, Bozeman, MT, 59717, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">llarsson@montana.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS:<br/>Montana Department of Environmental Quality contracts with Gallatin County to provide low-cost, radon test kits through the environmental services wing of the Gallatin City-County Health Department (GCCHD). This study explored psychometric, sociodemographic, and housing variables for participants in Gallatin County's Low-Cost Radon Test Kit Program (RP) during 2009. <br/>RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND:<br/>Gallatin County has a Zone 1 EPA radon designation, yet research suggests only 10% of low-income Gallatin County families with children have tested their homes. Outreach efforts to increase radon testing, particularly among vulnerable sub-populations, should be guided by careful assessment of current knowledge and testing behavior. <br/>METHODS:<br/>Survey data were collected from program participants (n = 34). Only RP participants who identified themselves as members of a household to be tested for radon were invited to complete the survey. A $15 department store gift card was given as a token of appreciation. <br/>RESULTS:<br/>Participation in the survey was positive (80.9 %). The majority of RP participants were home owners (n = 30, 88.2%). The average age was approximately 47 years (n = 22, x = 46.82, sd = 16.45, range 23-85) with one child in the home. The average combined household income bracket was $50,000 to $59,999. The average education level was graduation from a 2-year degree program or similar level. Most (n = 23, 67.1%) had tested their homes for radon before. Twenty respondents (58%) had tested prior residences as well. Nearly all participants (n = 32, 91%) had heard of the health effects of radon. Results of the psychometric findings similarly suggest that program participants do not meet traditional definitions of health disparate sub-populations. Ten out of 21 participants (61.8%) who completed testing had indoor radon concentrations greater than or equal to 4 picoCuries per liter. These data confirm Gallatin County's Zone 1 risk designation. <br/>IMPLICATIONS:<br/>The most important finding of this study is that the RP is not reaching the underserved. Formal RP goals should be established for participation rates by: families who rent their homes, families eligible for other health-department programs, and those who are first-time testers. In addition, these study RESULTS: provide the rationale for integrating the agendas of the environmental services and public health nursing specialties in rural, health departments.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:58:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:58:05Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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