TAEGYO: LEARNING FROM KOREAN WOMEN'S CULTURAL EDUCATION AND SELF-CARE PRACTICES

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157543
Type:
Presentation
Title:
TAEGYO: LEARNING FROM KOREAN WOMEN'S CULTURAL EDUCATION AND SELF-CARE PRACTICES
Abstract:
TAEGYO: LEARNING FROM KOREAN WOMEN'S CULTURAL EDUCATION AND SELF-CARE PRACTICES
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Lee, Kyoung-Eun K., RN, MS, ARNP
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington
Title:Ph.D.c
Contact Address:4200 Mary Gates Memorial Dr. NE W268, Seattle, WA, 98105, USA
The trend of recent global migration has highlighted the importance of cultural awareness among health care providers who increasingly interact with the diverse population migrating to the U.S. from all over the world. Considering this, health care providers need to understand how traditional cultural beliefs influence the health behaviors of childbearing immigrants from different culture.
All human health behavior is deeply rooted one's beliefs or value system usually encompassed within the culture in which they live. Furthermore, women's health beliefs and practices related to pregnancy vary widely depending on the socio-cultural context. Therefore, the awareness of particular culture-group's traditional beliefs and practices and cultural health behaviors during pregnancy is particularly crucial in obstetrical care settings in order to prevent any misunderstanding between health care providers and childbearing immigrant families, and thus, improve pregnancy health outcomes.
The purpose of this study is to review the literature surrounding Korean traditional cultural beliefs and practices related to pregnancy with particular focus on Taegyo, which is a type of traditional education and cultural self-care behaviors among childbearing Korean women. In traditional concept of Taegyo, it is defined as the holistic efforts of childbearing couples toward appropriate conception, fetal development, and healthy delivery from the moment of preparing parenthood to childbirth among Koreans.
CINAHL Plus, PubMed, and EthnoMed database were used to identify research studies, published both in Korea and the United States between 1991 and 2009, on Korean cultural beliefs and practices during the pregnancy. Thirteen research studies published both in Korea and the United States between 1991 and 2004 were selected for the review. The selecting method was iterative, with inclusion criteria being refined, as the review progressed. The findings, context, and analysis of the selected primary studies were used as data in this study. Background and components of Taekyo as well as the factors affecting recognition and practice of Takyo among Korean were identified from the literature review. In addition, the multi-dimensional effects of Takyo on the process of pregnancy among Korean women and their family were described in this study. In order to better understand their self-care behaviors and thus, to improve communication and health outcomes during the pregnancy, acknowledging the practices of Taegyo embedded in Korean's unique perspective toward fetus is an essential part of providing more holistic and individualized prenatal care to Korean women and their family in the U.S. Since the latest literature included in this review paper was published in 2004, the existence of gap in absence of recent research that examine recognition and practice of Taegyo among childbearing Korean women is recognized as a limitation for this study. In addition, generalization of the research findings needs caution since it is always advised not to assume that all from the same cultural group would share same cultural beliefs and practices during the pregnancy. Therefore, the learned cultural knowledge from this study should be applied in planning individualized, culturally sensitive prenatal care to Korean population along with active listening to each individual Korean mother and her family.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTAEGYO: LEARNING FROM KOREAN WOMEN'S CULTURAL EDUCATION AND SELF-CARE PRACTICESen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157543-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">TAEGYO: LEARNING FROM KOREAN WOMEN'S CULTURAL EDUCATION AND SELF-CARE PRACTICES</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lee, Kyoung-Eun K., RN, MS, ARNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Ph.D.c</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">4200 Mary Gates Memorial Dr. NE W268, Seattle, WA, 98105, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">leephd@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The trend of recent global migration has highlighted the importance of cultural awareness among health care providers who increasingly interact with the diverse population migrating to the U.S. from all over the world. Considering this, health care providers need to understand how traditional cultural beliefs influence the health behaviors of childbearing immigrants from different culture. <br/>All human health behavior is deeply rooted one's beliefs or value system usually encompassed within the culture in which they live. Furthermore, women's health beliefs and practices related to pregnancy vary widely depending on the socio-cultural context. Therefore, the awareness of particular culture-group's traditional beliefs and practices and cultural health behaviors during pregnancy is particularly crucial in obstetrical care settings in order to prevent any misunderstanding between health care providers and childbearing immigrant families, and thus, improve pregnancy health outcomes. <br/>The purpose of this study is to review the literature surrounding Korean traditional cultural beliefs and practices related to pregnancy with particular focus on Taegyo, which is a type of traditional education and cultural self-care behaviors among childbearing Korean women. In traditional concept of Taegyo, it is defined as the holistic efforts of childbearing couples toward appropriate conception, fetal development, and healthy delivery from the moment of preparing parenthood to childbirth among Koreans. <br/>CINAHL Plus, PubMed, and EthnoMed database were used to identify research studies, published both in Korea and the United States between 1991 and 2009, on Korean cultural beliefs and practices during the pregnancy. Thirteen research studies published both in Korea and the United States between 1991 and 2004 were selected for the review. The selecting method was iterative, with inclusion criteria being refined, as the review progressed. The findings, context, and analysis of the selected primary studies were used as data in this study. Background and components of Taekyo as well as the factors affecting recognition and practice of Takyo among Korean were identified from the literature review. In addition, the multi-dimensional effects of Takyo on the process of pregnancy among Korean women and their family were described in this study. In order to better understand their self-care behaviors and thus, to improve communication and health outcomes during the pregnancy, acknowledging the practices of Taegyo embedded in Korean's unique perspective toward fetus is an essential part of providing more holistic and individualized prenatal care to Korean women and their family in the U.S. Since the latest literature included in this review paper was published in 2004, the existence of gap in absence of recent research that examine recognition and practice of Taegyo among childbearing Korean women is recognized as a limitation for this study. In addition, generalization of the research findings needs caution since it is always advised not to assume that all from the same cultural group would share same cultural beliefs and practices during the pregnancy. Therefore, the learned cultural knowledge from this study should be applied in planning individualized, culturally sensitive prenatal care to Korean population along with active listening to each individual Korean mother and her family. <br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:58:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:58:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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