2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157544
Type:
Presentation
Title:
USING CBPR METHODS TO CONDUCT A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL OF EL JOVEN NOBLE
Abstract:
USING CBPR METHODS TO CONDUCT A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL OF EL JOVEN NOBLE
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Lesser, Janna, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:UT Health Science Center, San Antonio
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, TX, 78229, USA
Co-Authors:Partricia J. Kelly; Manuel Angel Oscos-Sanchez
BACKGROUND: Community-based participatory research (CBPR) emerged as an approach to address health disparities associated with social, political, and economic issues such as poverty, inadequate housing, racism, and lack of access to health resources. CBPR unites academic researchers and communities in the common goal of addressing community-identified health needs through a process of sharing power, establishing trust, fostering co-learning, enhancing strengths and ultimately building community capacity.
Interpersonal violence disproportionately affects youth living in Latino communities throughout the United States. Using METHODS: of CBPR, residents of a Latino community in South Texas partnered with academic researchers to develop and conduct community-wide surveys on violence attitudes and behaviors and a series of community-wide violence awareness events. In addition, they selected a violence prevention program based on Latino cultural values (El Joven Noble) to implement and evaluate among elementary school children.
FRAMEWORK: In this study, El Joven Noble was conceptualized as a Gendered Social Bond Theory-driven intervention that prevents violence by facilitating the development of a strong social bond to a gender-equitable and non-violent cultural identity. It replaces violence provoking norms and attitudes with a set of beliefs that support harmony, balance, and responsibility in all relationships.
METHODS:
DESIGN: A prospective randomized control design examined the effects of participation in El Joven Noble on violence-related attitudes among elementary school students at fourteen elementary schools. Randomization occurred at the school level. Students (n=180) from the seven intervention schools participated in El Joven Noble in year one and students (n=132) from the seven delayed entry control group schools received the intervention in year two. The ten session El Joven Noble curriculum was implemented weekly during an existing district wide after-school program.
DATA COLLECTION: Attitudes about Gangs (alpha=.87), Non-Violence Self-Efficacy (alpha =.70) and Beliefs in El Joven Noble concepts (alpha =.65) were measured at pre- and post-intervention and at three-month follow-up.
DATA ANALYSIS: Separate hierarchical random effect models for each primary outcome were fitted to identify the impact of the intervention on a subsample of at- risk youth. At-risk status was determined by measures of violence-related attitudes and behaviors reported at baseline. Time, at- risk youth indicator, intervention by time and the three way interaction term of time, at- risk youth and intervention were included as fixed effects, and both individual-specific and school-specific variables as random effects.
FINDINGS: The at-risk youth in the intervention group had significantly more positive changes in attitudes regarding violence self-efficacy at post-intervention (estimate=.69, p<.05) and 3-month follow-up (estimate =.58, p<.05) and significantly more positive changes in beliefs about El Joven Noble concepts (estimate=.18, p < .05) at post-intervention than did the at-risk control group youth.
CONCLUSIONS: CBPR provides a methodology to engage communities in the design, implementation and evaluation of their own prevention programs. It is well suited for the inclusion of community values, cultural heritage, and historical perspective into both the research process and product. This collaborative partnership was able to successfully combine CBPR METHODS: with a rigorous study design while providing sustained benefit to community partners.
NINR-funded (RO1 NR008565)
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUSING CBPR METHODS TO CONDUCT A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL OF EL JOVEN NOBLEen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157544-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">USING CBPR METHODS TO CONDUCT A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL OF EL JOVEN NOBLE</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lesser, Janna, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">UT Health Science Center, San Antonio</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, TX, 78229, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lesser@uthscsa.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Partricia J. Kelly; Manuel Angel Oscos-Sanchez</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">BACKGROUND: Community-based participatory research (CBPR) emerged as an approach to address health disparities associated with social, political, and economic issues such as poverty, inadequate housing, racism, and lack of access to health resources. CBPR unites academic researchers and communities in the common goal of addressing community-identified health needs through a process of sharing power, establishing trust, fostering co-learning, enhancing strengths and ultimately building community capacity. <br/>Interpersonal violence disproportionately affects youth living in Latino communities throughout the United States. Using METHODS: of CBPR, residents of a Latino community in South Texas partnered with academic researchers to develop and conduct community-wide surveys on violence attitudes and behaviors and a series of community-wide violence awareness events. In addition, they selected a violence prevention program based on Latino cultural values (El Joven Noble) to implement and evaluate among elementary school children. <br/>FRAMEWORK: In this study, El Joven Noble was conceptualized as a Gendered Social Bond Theory-driven intervention that prevents violence by facilitating the development of a strong social bond to a gender-equitable and non-violent cultural identity. It replaces violence provoking norms and attitudes with a set of beliefs that support harmony, balance, and responsibility in all relationships. <br/>METHODS:<br/>DESIGN: A prospective randomized control design examined the effects of participation in El Joven Noble on violence-related attitudes among elementary school students at fourteen elementary schools. Randomization occurred at the school level. Students (n=180) from the seven intervention schools participated in El Joven Noble in year one and students (n=132) from the seven delayed entry control group schools received the intervention in year two. The ten session El Joven Noble curriculum was implemented weekly during an existing district wide after-school program. <br/>DATA COLLECTION: Attitudes about Gangs (alpha=.87), Non-Violence Self-Efficacy (alpha =.70) and Beliefs in El Joven Noble concepts (alpha =.65) were measured at pre- and post-intervention and at three-month follow-up. <br/>DATA ANALYSIS: Separate hierarchical random effect models for each primary outcome were fitted to identify the impact of the intervention on a subsample of at- risk youth. At-risk status was determined by measures of violence-related attitudes and behaviors reported at baseline. Time, at- risk youth indicator, intervention by time and the three way interaction term of time, at- risk youth and intervention were included as fixed effects, and both individual-specific and school-specific variables as random effects. <br/>FINDINGS: The at-risk youth in the intervention group had significantly more positive changes in attitudes regarding violence self-efficacy at post-intervention (estimate=.69, p&lt;.05) and 3-month follow-up (estimate =.58, p&lt;.05) and significantly more positive changes in beliefs about El Joven Noble concepts (estimate=.18, p &lt; .05) at post-intervention than did the at-risk control group youth. <br/>CONCLUSIONS: CBPR provides a methodology to engage communities in the design, implementation and evaluation of their own prevention programs. It is well suited for the inclusion of community values, cultural heritage, and historical perspective into both the research process and product. This collaborative partnership was able to successfully combine CBPR METHODS: with a rigorous study design while providing sustained benefit to community partners. <br/>NINR-funded (RO1 NR008565)<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:58:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:58:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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