2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157545
Type:
Presentation
Title:
REFLECTIONS ON HOW WORKGROUP AND UNIT CHARACTERISTICS RELATE TO PATIENT FALLS
Abstract:
REFLECTIONS ON HOW WORKGROUP AND UNIT CHARACTERISTICS RELATE TO PATIENT FALLS
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Lim, Kyung Hee, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:The University of Arizona
Title:Postdoctoral Fellow
Contact Address:1305 N. Martin, Tucson, AZ, 85721-0203, USA
Co-Authors:Joyce Verran
PURPOSES/AIMS: The purpose of this presentation is to identify factors related to workgroups and nursing units that correlate with patient safety.
RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: Many significant factors related to patient safety have been reported, but there is little research on how the characteristics of nursing staff workgroups and nursing units relate to patient safety.
METHODS: Data were collected from 292 nursing staff, 11 nurse managers, 11 information system staff, and 11quality management staff on 11 acute care medical/surgical nursing units in three Arizona hospitals. Of the 11 units, seven achieved a sufficiently high response rate to be included in further sub-studies, so data from 7 units were analyzed. Data were collected via survey on 9 workgroup variables, 22 unit variables, and 3 patient safety variables for each unit. Although we collected data on adverse events, falls, and nosocomial infections, we will limit our discussion here to falls. Falls were categorized as falls with injury, falls without injury, and total falls. Spearman rho correlations were used to examine the associations of each fall category with the workgroup and unit variables because of the small sample size.
RESULTS: The overall mean incidence rate of falls with injury, falls without injury, and total falls were 1.23, 3.36, and 4.59 per 1000 patient-days for 3 months, respectively. Falls with injury, falls without injury, and total falls range from 0.35 to 2.59, from 1.00 to 6.27, and from 1.66 to 8.13, respectively. Positive correlations of total falls were found with staff vacancy rates; average length of hospital stay; % of elderly (>75yrs old) discharged; and the amount of technology available. The source of the positive technology correlation was in the use of the electronic health record and bedside (point-of-care) charting in two hospitals. Negative correlations were found with: nursing hours; number of patient days; patient movement (sum of admissions, discharges, transfers in and out); number of ICD-9 codes; distance that staff had to walk to complete an assignment; and the frequency of nursing staffÆs leaving the unit.
IMPLICATIONS: Patients falls are used as a standard measure of nursing care quality. The findings of this research might help in planning specific preventive strategies to improve patientsÆ safety. Further research will be needed to explain the positive correlation of technology with patient falls and the series of negative correlations with patient movement, distance and frequency of leaving the unit.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleREFLECTIONS ON HOW WORKGROUP AND UNIT CHARACTERISTICS RELATE TO PATIENT FALLSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157545-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">REFLECTIONS ON HOW WORKGROUP AND UNIT CHARACTERISTICS RELATE TO PATIENT FALLS</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lim, Kyung Hee, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of Arizona</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Postdoctoral Fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1305 N. Martin, Tucson, AZ, 85721-0203, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">klim@nursing.arizona.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Joyce Verran</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS: The purpose of this presentation is to identify factors related to workgroups and nursing units that correlate with patient safety.<br/> RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: Many significant factors related to patient safety have been reported, but there is little research on how the characteristics of nursing staff workgroups and nursing units relate to patient safety. <br/> METHODS: Data were collected from 292 nursing staff, 11 nurse managers, 11 information system staff, and 11quality management staff on 11 acute care medical/surgical nursing units in three Arizona hospitals. Of the 11 units, seven achieved a sufficiently high response rate to be included in further sub-studies, so data from 7 units were analyzed. Data were collected via survey on 9 workgroup variables, 22 unit variables, and 3 patient safety variables for each unit. Although we collected data on adverse events, falls, and nosocomial infections, we will limit our discussion here to falls. Falls were categorized as falls with injury, falls without injury, and total falls. Spearman rho correlations were used to examine the associations of each fall category with the workgroup and unit variables because of the small sample size.<br/> RESULTS: The overall mean incidence rate of falls with injury, falls without injury, and total falls were 1.23, 3.36, and 4.59 per 1000 patient-days for 3 months, respectively. Falls with injury, falls without injury, and total falls range from 0.35 to 2.59, from 1.00 to 6.27, and from 1.66 to 8.13, respectively. Positive correlations of total falls were found with staff vacancy rates; average length of hospital stay; % of elderly (&gt;75yrs old) discharged; and the amount of technology available. The source of the positive technology correlation was in the use of the electronic health record and bedside (point-of-care) charting in two hospitals. Negative correlations were found with: nursing hours; number of patient days; patient movement (sum of admissions, discharges, transfers in and out); number of ICD-9 codes; distance that staff had to walk to complete an assignment; and the frequency of nursing staff&AElig;s leaving the unit. <br/> IMPLICATIONS: Patients falls are used as a standard measure of nursing care quality. The findings of this research might help in planning specific preventive strategies to improve patients&AElig; safety. Further research will be needed to explain the positive correlation of technology with patient falls and the series of negative correlations with patient movement, distance and frequency of leaving the unit.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:58:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:58:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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