2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157546
Type:
Presentation
Title:
INCREASING MINORITIES IN NEW MEXICO
Abstract:
INCREASING MINORITIES IN NEW MEXICO
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Lopez-Bushnell, Kathy, EdD, MPH, MSN, RNC
P.I. Institution Name:University of New Mexico Hospitals
Title:Director Nursing Research
Contact Address:2211 Lomas Blvd NW, Albuquerque, NM, 87106, USA
PURPOSES/AIMS: The purpose of Project DIVERSITY is to create a nursing pipeline for Native American and Hispanic students who are interested in nursing to receive academic and professional support as a means to augment the numbers of underrepresented groups in the nursing workforce.
RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: The aims and rationale of Project DIVERSITY were to recruit middle school and high school students who were interested in nursing and educate them about the nursing profession through workshops, job shadowing, and mentoring. By providing tutoring in academic subjects we hoped to strengthen their chances of entering nursing school and higher education.
The conceptual basis is based on the Bandura's (1986) social cognitive theory.
METHODS: New Mexico has more than a 50% minority population and less than 10% of the state's nurses are Hispanic or Native American. Statistics show that more than 54% of NM ethnic minority students do not graduate from high school. It has been shown that people generally feel more satisfied when they are cared for by someone who looks like them, speaks the same language, or are from the same racial or ethnic background. It is because of this disparity in health care that the need for minority representation in nursing is so important at this juncture in time. In the U.S., ethnic minority communities make up around 30% of the total population of the nation whereas only 11.6% of the nations' nursing workforce is comprised of minorities.
There were more than 60 Native American and Hispanic high school students and 40 middle students recruited into this program. The high school students were chosen on the basis of interviews, applications, letters of recommendation, written essays and GPAs. The program granted high school students access to nursing workshops, tutoring and college preparation support as well as nursing mentoring and job shadowing. The mentoring workshop segment of the program is made up of 2-hour sessions covering topics such as dissections, nutrition, STD's and various presentations, among other informational sessions. Tutoring and college preparation time was provided three days a week after school where students could work with tutors and counselors to improve their grades and prepare for college. The students have close relationships with their mentors and formed close bonds. They communicate frequently with their mentors via phone and email. Eight students participated in the job-shadowing and stated that they plan on entering the nursing workforce
RESULTS: The data indicated that underserved ethnic minority high school students require a great deal of additional academic preparation, as they are not ready to enter the nursing workforce given their current skill set and knowledge base. Although there is definite interest and enthusiasm for entering nursing, their educational foundation is so weak that even with increased support they still lack the necessary skills to enter nursing at this time. The IMPLICATIONS: are clear that in order to accomplish the end goal of having students enter the nursing pipeline, they must be identified earlier and academically supported
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleINCREASING MINORITIES IN NEW MEXICOen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157546-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">INCREASING MINORITIES IN NEW MEXICO</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lopez-Bushnell, Kathy, EdD, MPH, MSN, RNC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of New Mexico Hospitals</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Director Nursing Research</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2211 Lomas Blvd NW, Albuquerque, NM, 87106, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">klopezbushnell@salud.unm.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS: The purpose of Project DIVERSITY is to create a nursing pipeline for Native American and Hispanic students who are interested in nursing to receive academic and professional support as a means to augment the numbers of underrepresented groups in the nursing workforce.<br/>RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: The aims and rationale of Project DIVERSITY were to recruit middle school and high school students who were interested in nursing and educate them about the nursing profession through workshops, job shadowing, and mentoring. By providing tutoring in academic subjects we hoped to strengthen their chances of entering nursing school and higher education. <br/>The conceptual basis is based on the Bandura's (1986) social cognitive theory. <br/>METHODS: New Mexico has more than a 50% minority population and less than 10% of the state's nurses are Hispanic or Native American. Statistics show that more than 54% of NM ethnic minority students do not graduate from high school. It has been shown that people generally feel more satisfied when they are cared for by someone who looks like them, speaks the same language, or are from the same racial or ethnic background. It is because of this disparity in health care that the need for minority representation in nursing is so important at this juncture in time. In the U.S., ethnic minority communities make up around 30% of the total population of the nation whereas only 11.6% of the nations' nursing workforce is comprised of minorities. <br/>There were more than 60 Native American and Hispanic high school students and 40 middle students recruited into this program. The high school students were chosen on the basis of interviews, applications, letters of recommendation, written essays and GPAs. The program granted high school students access to nursing workshops, tutoring and college preparation support as well as nursing mentoring and job shadowing. The mentoring workshop segment of the program is made up of 2-hour sessions covering topics such as dissections, nutrition, STD's and various presentations, among other informational sessions. Tutoring and college preparation time was provided three days a week after school where students could work with tutors and counselors to improve their grades and prepare for college. The students have close relationships with their mentors and formed close bonds. They communicate frequently with their mentors via phone and email. Eight students participated in the job-shadowing and stated that they plan on entering the nursing workforce <br/>RESULTS: The data indicated that underserved ethnic minority high school students require a great deal of additional academic preparation, as they are not ready to enter the nursing workforce given their current skill set and knowledge base. Although there is definite interest and enthusiasm for entering nursing, their educational foundation is so weak that even with increased support they still lack the necessary skills to enter nursing at this time. The IMPLICATIONS: are clear that in order to accomplish the end goal of having students enter the nursing pipeline, they must be identified earlier and academically supported <br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:58:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:58:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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