2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157547
Type:
Presentation
Title:
AROMATHERAPY: fMRI AND MOOD CHANGES IN FEMALES
Abstract:
AROMATHERAPY: fMRI AND MOOD CHANGES IN FEMALES
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Lowe, Ann Elizabeth, GNP
P.I. Institution Name:UCLA School of Nursing
Title:GNP, Ph.D.
Contact Address:42286 Cosmic Dr., Temecula, CA, 92592, USA
Co-Authors:Leah FitzGerald
Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a stress-mediated condition that affects women by a 2:1 ratio, significantly impacting their quality of life. Traditional treatments have frequently been ineffective. Conceptual Basis: According to the chronic pain model (Mayer et.al., 2006), perception is modified by emotion and cognition, with victims of chronic pain preferentially activating emotional pain-enhancing neural circuits. Smell is connected to taste, and has a direct connection to the amygdala, the brain's fear center. Odor impacts pain indirectly through its intermediary impact on mood. Subjects with IBS have shown increased perceptual responses to visceral, somatic and auditory stimuli, but olfaction has not been studied. We hypothesized that responses to odors would be stronger in the IBS group.
PURPOSE: To determine if odor perception, mood changes, and brain activation patterns differed between groups (IBS: N=8; and healthy controls [HC]: N=9) when exposed to pleasant and unpleasant odors in an emotionally evocative and cognitive context. Method: The Positive and Negative Affect Scale (PANAS-X) measured mood. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to determine brain activations in response to odors during exposure to a validated emotional faces protocol used to evoke emotional arousal (Match Emotions) and emotional modulation (Identify Gender).
RESULTS: Compared to HCs, the IBS group was more accurate in rating odors, better able to perceive odors, and gave (by %) higher ratings for odor hedonics (pleasant: 35%; unpleasant: 29.76%), intensity (pleasant 6.81%; unpleasant 11.11%), and familiarity (pleasant 13.69%; unpleasant 12.30%). While HCs did not evidence any mood changes in response to odors, patients responded to both pleasant and unpleasant odors with more negative emotions (PANAS-X; guilt, sadness, hostility; [group difference; ANOVA: pleasant p=.05; unpleasant p=.02]). The emotional arousal task evoked more limbic brain responses in the IBS group. Conversely, the emotional modulation task evoked more in the HC's. However, unpleasant odors enhanced neural activity in limbic structures for IBS subjects (insula and anterior cingulate cortex); while evidencing no significant changes in the HC group. Pleasant odors evoked cognitive circuits (dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex) in both groups. Findings were more pronounced during the emotional modulation task. Significant activations occurred in the insula, a region involved in the processing and modulation of interoceptive information and emotion regulation. Right anterior insula activations occurred for both IBS and HCs during the pleasant odor condition, consistent with conscious perception of odors; posterior insula activations occurred for IBS patients, but not for HC's during the unpleasant odors. Findings suggest enhanced odor sensitivity in the IBS group most evident during the emotional task, with a preferential response of negative affect to either odor condition.
IMPLICATIONS: Unpleasant odors, which only evoked changes in the IBS group, may play a prominent role in symptom perpetuation. Pleasant odors increased cognitive circuitry. As women with IBS are more sensitive to odors, aromatherapy, a popular alternative treatment modality, may be particularly effective for this patient group in downregulating emotional circuitry. Funded by the Oppenheimer Foundation, Sigma Theta Tau, and UCLA Brain Mapping Center.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAROMATHERAPY: fMRI AND MOOD CHANGES IN FEMALESen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157547-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">AROMATHERAPY: fMRI AND MOOD CHANGES IN FEMALES</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lowe, Ann Elizabeth, GNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">UCLA School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">GNP, Ph.D.</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">42286 Cosmic Dr., Temecula, CA, 92592, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ael555@verizon.net</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Leah FitzGerald</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a stress-mediated condition that affects women by a 2:1 ratio, significantly impacting their quality of life. Traditional treatments have frequently been ineffective. Conceptual Basis: According to the chronic pain model (Mayer et.al., 2006), perception is modified by emotion and cognition, with victims of chronic pain preferentially activating emotional pain-enhancing neural circuits. Smell is connected to taste, and has a direct connection to the amygdala, the brain's fear center. Odor impacts pain indirectly through its intermediary impact on mood. Subjects with IBS have shown increased perceptual responses to visceral, somatic and auditory stimuli, but olfaction has not been studied. We hypothesized that responses to odors would be stronger in the IBS group. <br/>PURPOSE: To determine if odor perception, mood changes, and brain activation patterns differed between groups (IBS: N=8; and healthy controls [HC]: N=9) when exposed to pleasant and unpleasant odors in an emotionally evocative and cognitive context. Method: The Positive and Negative Affect Scale (PANAS-X) measured mood. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to determine brain activations in response to odors during exposure to a validated emotional faces protocol used to evoke emotional arousal (Match Emotions) and emotional modulation (Identify Gender). <br/>RESULTS: Compared to HCs, the IBS group was more accurate in rating odors, better able to perceive odors, and gave (by %) higher ratings for odor hedonics (pleasant: 35%; unpleasant: 29.76%), intensity (pleasant 6.81%; unpleasant 11.11%), and familiarity (pleasant 13.69%; unpleasant 12.30%). While HCs did not evidence any mood changes in response to odors, patients responded to both pleasant and unpleasant odors with more negative emotions (PANAS-X; guilt, sadness, hostility; [group difference; ANOVA: pleasant p=.05; unpleasant p=.02]). The emotional arousal task evoked more limbic brain responses in the IBS group. Conversely, the emotional modulation task evoked more in the HC's. However, unpleasant odors enhanced neural activity in limbic structures for IBS subjects (insula and anterior cingulate cortex); while evidencing no significant changes in the HC group. Pleasant odors evoked cognitive circuits (dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex) in both groups. Findings were more pronounced during the emotional modulation task. Significant activations occurred in the insula, a region involved in the processing and modulation of interoceptive information and emotion regulation. Right anterior insula activations occurred for both IBS and HCs during the pleasant odor condition, consistent with conscious perception of odors; posterior insula activations occurred for IBS patients, but not for HC's during the unpleasant odors. Findings suggest enhanced odor sensitivity in the IBS group most evident during the emotional task, with a preferential response of negative affect to either odor condition. <br/>IMPLICATIONS: Unpleasant odors, which only evoked changes in the IBS group, may play a prominent role in symptom perpetuation. Pleasant odors increased cognitive circuitry. As women with IBS are more sensitive to odors, aromatherapy, a popular alternative treatment modality, may be particularly effective for this patient group in downregulating emotional circuitry. Funded by the Oppenheimer Foundation, Sigma Theta Tau, and UCLA Brain Mapping Center.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:58:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:58:25Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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