2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157550
Type:
Presentation
Title:
WHO TO TELL? LATINO MEN'S DISCLOSURE OF THEIR PROSTATE CANCER
Abstract:
WHO TO TELL? LATINO MEN'S DISCLOSURE OF THEIR PROSTATE CANCER
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Maliski, Sally L., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of California, Los Angeles
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:4-250 Factor Bldg, Box 956918, Los Angeles, CA, 90095-6918, USA
Co-Authors:Sarah Connor; Mark S Litwin
PURPOSES/AIMS:
The purpose of this study is to understand prostate cancer disclosure decisions from the perspectives of Latino men who have had prostate cancer treatment.
BACKGROUND:
Decisions related to prostate cancer treatment, disclosure, and screening are fraught with uncertainty. Understanding how Latino men cope with this uncertainty has become critical for several reasons. Prostate cancer is the most common noncutaneous cancer and second leading cause of death among men in the United States, and Latinos are the fastest growing minority in the United States accounting for 50% or more of the population in some regions, such as California. While there is little data on immigrant status and prostate cancer, what is available indicates that Latino immigrants have higher prostate cancer rates than rates reported in their native countries, but similar rates to US-born Latino men. Many Latino men carry the added burden of being monolingual Spanish-speaking or speaking English as a second language. For these men, much of the available written or verbal information is not accessible. Also, it is unknown if or how acculturation influences these situations. Additionally low-income Latinos are more likely to be uninsured and have less formal education than their non-Latino white counterparts which has been cited as a reason for having higher stage disease at diagnosis than Caucasian men. Yet, as Gilligan (2005) highlights in his review of literature related to prostate cancer and social disparities, prostate cancer among Latinos has received very little attention in the medical or public health literature. Little is known about how Latino men who have been treated for prostate cancer view disclosing their diagnosis to others. This is especially important for first degree male relative to be aware of their increased risk.
METHODS:
We will employed a descriptive design using ôfundamentalö qualitative description. We did in-depth individual interviews with 30 Latino men who had been treated for prostate cancer and could reflect back on their disclosure experiences. Interviews were conducted in-person by male, bilingual interviewers. Analysis is being conducted using constructivist grounded theory techniques.
RESULTS:
Analysis is not yet completed, but preliminary results are revealing that there is a range of disclosure patterns among Latino men from not disclosing at all to becoming active in telling others to have screening. This range will be more clearly characterized as analysis proceeds.
IMPLICATIONS:
These results will inform the development of interventions to encourage and facilitate Latino menÆs disclosure of a prostate cancer diagnosis, especially to their first degree male relatives.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWHO TO TELL? LATINO MEN'S DISCLOSURE OF THEIR PROSTATE CANCERen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157550-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">WHO TO TELL? LATINO MEN'S DISCLOSURE OF THEIR PROSTATE CANCER</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Maliski, Sally L., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California, Los Angeles</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">4-250 Factor Bldg, Box 956918, Los Angeles, CA, 90095-6918, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">smaliski@sonnet.ucla.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Sarah Connor; Mark S Litwin</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS:<br/>The purpose of this study is to understand prostate cancer disclosure decisions from the perspectives of Latino men who have had prostate cancer treatment. <br/>BACKGROUND:<br/>Decisions related to prostate cancer treatment, disclosure, and screening are fraught with uncertainty. Understanding how Latino men cope with this uncertainty has become critical for several reasons. Prostate cancer is the most common noncutaneous cancer and second leading cause of death among men in the United States, and Latinos are the fastest growing minority in the United States accounting for 50% or more of the population in some regions, such as California. While there is little data on immigrant status and prostate cancer, what is available indicates that Latino immigrants have higher prostate cancer rates than rates reported in their native countries, but similar rates to US-born Latino men. Many Latino men carry the added burden of being monolingual Spanish-speaking or speaking English as a second language. For these men, much of the available written or verbal information is not accessible. Also, it is unknown if or how acculturation influences these situations. Additionally low-income Latinos are more likely to be uninsured and have less formal education than their non-Latino white counterparts which has been cited as a reason for having higher stage disease at diagnosis than Caucasian men. Yet, as Gilligan (2005) highlights in his review of literature related to prostate cancer and social disparities, prostate cancer among Latinos has received very little attention in the medical or public health literature. Little is known about how Latino men who have been treated for prostate cancer view disclosing their diagnosis to others. This is especially important for first degree male relative to be aware of their increased risk.<br/>METHODS:<br/>We will employed a descriptive design using &ocirc;fundamental&ouml; qualitative description. We did in-depth individual interviews with 30 Latino men who had been treated for prostate cancer and could reflect back on their disclosure experiences. Interviews were conducted in-person by male, bilingual interviewers. Analysis is being conducted using constructivist grounded theory techniques. <br/>RESULTS:<br/>Analysis is not yet completed, but preliminary results are revealing that there is a range of disclosure patterns among Latino men from not disclosing at all to becoming active in telling others to have screening. This range will be more clearly characterized as analysis proceeds. <br/>IMPLICATIONS:<br/>These results will inform the development of interventions to encourage and facilitate Latino men&AElig;s disclosure of a prostate cancer diagnosis, especially to their first degree male relatives. <br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:58:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:58:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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