2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157551
Type:
Presentation
Title:
NURSES' SPIRITUAL CARE PRACTICES: ASSESSMENT, TYPE, FREQUENCY, AND CORRELATES
Abstract:
NURSES' SPIRITUAL CARE PRACTICES: ASSESSMENT, TYPE, FREQUENCY, AND CORRELATES
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Mamier, Iris, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Loma Linda University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:West Hall, Loma Linda, CA, 92350, USA
PURPOSE/AIMS: The purpose of this study was to explore the type, frequency, and correlates of nurses' spiritual care practices in a faith-based, tertiary care health system.

RATIONALE/BACKGROUND: Although research has established a pervasive positive attitude of nurses towards patient spirituality, there is scant evidence that attention to the spiritual domain, in fact, is a priority in acute nursing care. In the absence of psychometrically-sound assessment instruments to measure nurses' spiritual care practices, researchers have relied on nurses' attitudes and perceptions as a proxy measure for their spiritual care practice and have studied various specialty environments, such as oncology, hospice, and parish nursing. Few studies allow for comparisons across different nursing specialties. Nurses' spirituality and religiousness have been associated with a more positive attitude towards spiritual care; however, it has not been established what nurse-specific and organizational factors are associated with nurses' actual spiritual care practices.

METHODS:
In a descriptive, correlational study, a convenience sample of 554 (24%) of the Registered Nurses employed at a western United States health system participated in an online survey. Nurses spiritual care practices were assessed using the 17-item Nurses' Spiritual Care Practice Questionnaire (NSCQ). Factorial validity and reliability of the NSCQ were established. After descriptive analyses, bivariate and multivariate statistical analyses were conducted to determine the factors that were associated with the frequency of providing spiritual care.

RESULTS:
Spiritual care practices most frequently endorsed were 'remaining with a patient after completing a task to show caring," "assessing patients' spiritual beliefs pertaining to health," "listening to patients' stories of illness," and "listening to patients' spiritual concerns." Although nurses' mean spiritual care practice scores were relatively low, item endorsement showed variability. Bivariate analyses revealed associations between nurses' spirituality, religiousness, and work environment and the dependent variable, nurses' spiritual care practices. Working day shift, past education in spiritual care, and nurses' comfort level with spiritual care also were significant. No demographic variables were significant. Predictors in the final multivariate model (in order of strength) were: nurses' perception that spiritual issues at the work place came up frequently, nurses being more spiritual, nurses not working in pediatric care, and nurses having received education about spiritual care in the past.

IMPLICATIONS:
Although the findings of this study may be most representative of nurses practicing in a faith-based, tertiary care environment, they also may be informative about spiritual care behaviors of nurses who self-report as both spiritual and religious. It is noteworthy that listening and assessing items were among the most frequently endorsed spiritual care practices of nurses also scoring high on the spiritual and religious measures. The fact that nurses who previously received education about spiritual care scored higher on the NSCQ encourages efforts to train nurses in spiritual care. Last, the study introduces a new, reliable assessment instrument for nurses spiritual care practices that may be useful for adult acute and mental health care.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNURSES' SPIRITUAL CARE PRACTICES: ASSESSMENT, TYPE, FREQUENCY, AND CORRELATESen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157551-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">NURSES' SPIRITUAL CARE PRACTICES: ASSESSMENT, TYPE, FREQUENCY, AND CORRELATES</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mamier, Iris, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Loma Linda University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">West Hall, Loma Linda, CA, 92350, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">imamier@llu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE/AIMS: The purpose of this study was to explore the type, frequency, and correlates of nurses' spiritual care practices in a faith-based, tertiary care health system. <br/><br/>RATIONALE/BACKGROUND: Although research has established a pervasive positive attitude of nurses towards patient spirituality, there is scant evidence that attention to the spiritual domain, in fact, is a priority in acute nursing care. In the absence of psychometrically-sound assessment instruments to measure nurses' spiritual care practices, researchers have relied on nurses' attitudes and perceptions as a proxy measure for their spiritual care practice and have studied various specialty environments, such as oncology, hospice, and parish nursing. Few studies allow for comparisons across different nursing specialties. Nurses' spirituality and religiousness have been associated with a more positive attitude towards spiritual care; however, it has not been established what nurse-specific and organizational factors are associated with nurses' actual spiritual care practices.<br/><br/>METHODS: <br/>In a descriptive, correlational study, a convenience sample of 554 (24%) of the Registered Nurses employed at a western United States health system participated in an online survey. Nurses spiritual care practices were assessed using the 17-item Nurses' Spiritual Care Practice Questionnaire (NSCQ). Factorial validity and reliability of the NSCQ were established. After descriptive analyses, bivariate and multivariate statistical analyses were conducted to determine the factors that were associated with the frequency of providing spiritual care.<br/><br/>RESULTS: <br/>Spiritual care practices most frequently endorsed were 'remaining with a patient after completing a task to show caring,&quot; &quot;assessing patients' spiritual beliefs pertaining to health,&quot; &quot;listening to patients' stories of illness,&quot; and &quot;listening to patients' spiritual concerns.&quot; Although nurses' mean spiritual care practice scores were relatively low, item endorsement showed variability. Bivariate analyses revealed associations between nurses' spirituality, religiousness, and work environment and the dependent variable, nurses' spiritual care practices. Working day shift, past education in spiritual care, and nurses' comfort level with spiritual care also were significant. No demographic variables were significant. Predictors in the final multivariate model (in order of strength) were: nurses' perception that spiritual issues at the work place came up frequently, nurses being more spiritual, nurses not working in pediatric care, and nurses having received education about spiritual care in the past.<br/><br/>IMPLICATIONS: <br/>Although the findings of this study may be most representative of nurses practicing in a faith-based, tertiary care environment, they also may be informative about spiritual care behaviors of nurses who self-report as both spiritual and religious. It is noteworthy that listening and assessing items were among the most frequently endorsed spiritual care practices of nurses also scoring high on the spiritual and religious measures. The fact that nurses who previously received education about spiritual care scored higher on the NSCQ encourages efforts to train nurses in spiritual care. Last, the study introduces a new, reliable assessment instrument for nurses spiritual care practices that may be useful for adult acute and mental health care.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:58:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:58:39Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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