CHALLENGES EXPERIENCED BY ADOLESCENTS/EMERGING ADULTS LIVING WITH TYPE 1 DIABETES

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157552
Type:
Presentation
Title:
CHALLENGES EXPERIENCED BY ADOLESCENTS/EMERGING ADULTS LIVING WITH TYPE 1 DIABETES
Abstract:
CHALLENGES EXPERIENCED BY ADOLESCENTS/EMERGING ADULTS LIVING WITH TYPE 1 DIABETES
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Mandleco, Barbara, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Brigham Young University College of Nursing
Title:Professor
Contact Address:474 SWKT, Provo, UT, 84602, USA
Co-Authors:Cheryl Scholes; Susanne Olsen Roper; Karen Dearing; Tina Dyches
PURPOSES/AIMS:
To discover challenges adolescents/emerging adults with type 1 diabetes face and then examine whether these challenges vary according to their level of metabolic control (HbA1c).
RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND:
The unique stages of adolescence/emerging adulthood, in addition to the diagnosis of a chronic illness such as type 1 diabetes can be difficult and challenging. In addition, the required treatment regime may contribute to dependence on parents and restricted freedoms. However, there is minimal information in the literature examining adolescent/emerging adults' perceptions of the challenges they face related to the required treatment regimes if one has type 1 diabetes, and little or no literature examining perception differences of these challenges when these individuals demonstrate high or low metabolic control as measured by HbA1c levels.
METHODS:
Using a qualitative descriptive design eight participants identified as having high HbA1c levels (above 7.5%), and seven participants identified as having low HbA1c levels (at or below 7.5%) were interviewed about challenges they experience in living with type 1 diabetes. The interviews were then transcribed verbatim and analyzed using qualitative methods.
RESULTS:
Challenges identified by participants related to interactions with their family members, people outside the family, and health care providers as well as their own responsibilities related to managing type 1 diabetes. Family challenges included parents who were micromanagers and concerned about following the treatment regime (counting carbohydrates, taking the correct amount of insulin); an alternate challenging pattern described parents who left management of diabetes up to the adolescent, rarely were there to help, did not monitor glucose or dietary intake, and did not provide regular meals or meals that considered carbohydrate content. Family members posed challenges when they forgot the participant had diabetes, or were overly concerned about what kinds of foods the participant could eat. People outside the family were uncomfortable if they were responsible for participants and assumed participants caused their own diabetes. Challenges related to health care professionals were that they tended to be authoritarian in interactions and were not as supportive/helpful as participants wished they were. Challenges related to their own attitudes/behaviors included the need to constantly monitor their diabetes so their future health would not be affected and needing to change their future career goals because of diabetes related career limitations. Challenges did not vary across groups based on HbA1c levels.
IMPLICATIONS:
It is important to provide education and support beyond the initial period of diagnosis to adolescents/emerging adults with diabetes so they are able to overcome the challenges inherent in coping with their chronic disease, help them learn appropriate/effective ways to manage their diabetes, and encourage them to work on developing positive relationships with healthcare professionals. Finally, educating parents and family members about the challenges faced by adolescents with type 1 diabetes may encourage them to help and support the adolescent overcome these challenges.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCHALLENGES EXPERIENCED BY ADOLESCENTS/EMERGING ADULTS LIVING WITH TYPE 1 DIABETESen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157552-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">CHALLENGES EXPERIENCED BY ADOLESCENTS/EMERGING ADULTS LIVING WITH TYPE 1 DIABETES</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mandleco, Barbara, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Brigham Young University College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">474 SWKT, Provo, UT, 84602, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Barbara_Mandleco@byu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Cheryl Scholes; Susanne Olsen Roper; Karen Dearing; Tina Dyches</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS: <br/>To discover challenges adolescents/emerging adults with type 1 diabetes face and then examine whether these challenges vary according to their level of metabolic control (HbA1c).<br/>RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: <br/>The unique stages of adolescence/emerging adulthood, in addition to the diagnosis of a chronic illness such as type 1 diabetes can be difficult and challenging. In addition, the required treatment regime may contribute to dependence on parents and restricted freedoms. However, there is minimal information in the literature examining adolescent/emerging adults' perceptions of the challenges they face related to the required treatment regimes if one has type 1 diabetes, and little or no literature examining perception differences of these challenges when these individuals demonstrate high or low metabolic control as measured by HbA1c levels.<br/>METHODS: <br/>Using a qualitative descriptive design eight participants identified as having high HbA1c levels (above 7.5%), and seven participants identified as having low HbA1c levels (at or below 7.5%) were interviewed about challenges they experience in living with type 1 diabetes. The interviews were then transcribed verbatim and analyzed using qualitative methods.<br/>RESULTS: <br/>Challenges identified by participants related to interactions with their family members, people outside the family, and health care providers as well as their own responsibilities related to managing type 1 diabetes. Family challenges included parents who were micromanagers and concerned about following the treatment regime (counting carbohydrates, taking the correct amount of insulin); an alternate challenging pattern described parents who left management of diabetes up to the adolescent, rarely were there to help, did not monitor glucose or dietary intake, and did not provide regular meals or meals that considered carbohydrate content. Family members posed challenges when they forgot the participant had diabetes, or were overly concerned about what kinds of foods the participant could eat. People outside the family were uncomfortable if they were responsible for participants and assumed participants caused their own diabetes. Challenges related to health care professionals were that they tended to be authoritarian in interactions and were not as supportive/helpful as participants wished they were. Challenges related to their own attitudes/behaviors included the need to constantly monitor their diabetes so their future health would not be affected and needing to change their future career goals because of diabetes related career limitations. Challenges did not vary across groups based on HbA1c levels.<br/>IMPLICATIONS: <br/>It is important to provide education and support beyond the initial period of diagnosis to adolescents/emerging adults with diabetes so they are able to overcome the challenges inherent in coping with their chronic disease, help them learn appropriate/effective ways to manage their diabetes, and encourage them to work on developing positive relationships with healthcare professionals. Finally, educating parents and family members about the challenges faced by adolescents with type 1 diabetes may encourage them to help and support the adolescent overcome these challenges. <br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:58:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:58:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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