NONVIOLENT COMMUNICATION (NVC) TRAINING AND EMPATHY IN MALE PAROLEES: A PILOT STUDY

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157553
Type:
Presentation
Title:
NONVIOLENT COMMUNICATION (NVC) TRAINING AND EMPATHY IN MALE PAROLEES: A PILOT STUDY
Abstract:
NONVIOLENT COMMUNICATION (NVC) TRAINING AND EMPATHY IN MALE PAROLEES: A PILOT STUDY
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Marlow, Elizabeth, C-FNP, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of California, Los Angeles
Title:Post Doctoral Fellow
Contact Address:700 Tiverton Avenue, 3-653 Factor Bldg, Box 691721, Los Angeles, CA, 90095-6917, USA
PURPOSES/AIMS: The purpose of this study was to pilot test a behavioral intervention program, Nonviolent Communication (NVC), for improving communication skills in men on parole. The specific aim was to evaluate the impact of NVC training on changes in the participants' ability to develop empathy for others and for themselves. It was hypothesized that participants' capacity to resolve conflict empathically and to develop positive relationships with others would improve as a result of NVC training
RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: Approximately 60% to 70% of all individuals released from prison return within 3 years of release. These individuals often have long criminal histories and their time in the free world is punctuated by frequent reincarcerations. Many formerly incarcerated individuals reenter their communities having adapted to the psychological demands of prison and criminal life. These adaptations, e.g. interpersonal distrust, social isolation, and institutional dependence, critical for survival in the correctional facility and on "the streets", are considered antisocial in free society. There is limited research on the process of undoing the disadvantageous coping skills and psychosocial adaptations resulting from multiple periods of incarceration and long histories of substance abuse. Such research is important, as is it often these forms of coping that most greatly impact an individual's ability to successfully reintegrate into his home community.
METHODS: A single group pre- and post-test design was employed to test the impact of the intervention. Changes in participants' level of empathy were evaluated via: 1) pre- and post-test completion of the Balanced Emotional Empathy Scale (BEES); 2) post-intervention focus groups; and 3) post-intervention individual interviews with key informants.
RESULTS: Thirty male parolees residing in a community-based substance abuse treatment (SAT) program enrolled in the 8-week NVC intervention. Findings revealed significant changes in BEES scores, i.e. increased levels of empathy pre - and post-intervention (p < .05). During focus groups and individual interviews, participants articulated their use of NVC to: 1) resolve conflicts with friends and family members; 2) negotiate stressful interactions with parole agents and SAT program staff; and 3) give empathy to themselves, although self-empathy was the most difficult skill for most participants to master.
IMPLICATIONS: These findings indicate the beneficial impact that NVC training had on participants' levels of empathy and empathic communication skills. They reveal a high rate of acceptance of NVC among participants and demonstrate participants' ability to employ NVC skills during challenging interpersonal interactions. RESULTS: from this study suggest that NVC training may be an efficacious intervention for improving paroled individuals' communication and coping skills and may positively influence participants' reintegration efforts, particularly in developing supportive relationships with others.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNONVIOLENT COMMUNICATION (NVC) TRAINING AND EMPATHY IN MALE PAROLEES: A PILOT STUDYen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157553-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">NONVIOLENT COMMUNICATION (NVC) TRAINING AND EMPATHY IN MALE PAROLEES: A PILOT STUDY</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Marlow, Elizabeth, C-FNP, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California, Los Angeles</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Post Doctoral Fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">700 Tiverton Avenue, 3-653 Factor Bldg, Box 691721, Los Angeles, CA, 90095-6917, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">emarlownp@yahoo.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS: The purpose of this study was to pilot test a behavioral intervention program, Nonviolent Communication (NVC), for improving communication skills in men on parole. The specific aim was to evaluate the impact of NVC training on changes in the participants' ability to develop empathy for others and for themselves. It was hypothesized that participants' capacity to resolve conflict empathically and to develop positive relationships with others would improve as a result of NVC training <br/>RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: Approximately 60% to 70% of all individuals released from prison return within 3 years of release. These individuals often have long criminal histories and their time in the free world is punctuated by frequent reincarcerations. Many formerly incarcerated individuals reenter their communities having adapted to the psychological demands of prison and criminal life. These adaptations, e.g. interpersonal distrust, social isolation, and institutional dependence, critical for survival in the correctional facility and on &quot;the streets&quot;, are considered antisocial in free society. There is limited research on the process of undoing the disadvantageous coping skills and psychosocial adaptations resulting from multiple periods of incarceration and long histories of substance abuse. Such research is important, as is it often these forms of coping that most greatly impact an individual's ability to successfully reintegrate into his home community. <br/>METHODS: A single group pre- and post-test design was employed to test the impact of the intervention. Changes in participants' level of empathy were evaluated via: 1) pre- and post-test completion of the Balanced Emotional Empathy Scale (BEES); 2) post-intervention focus groups; and 3) post-intervention individual interviews with key informants. <br/>RESULTS: Thirty male parolees residing in a community-based substance abuse treatment (SAT) program enrolled in the 8-week NVC intervention. Findings revealed significant changes in BEES scores, i.e. increased levels of empathy pre - and post-intervention (p &lt; .05). During focus groups and individual interviews, participants articulated their use of NVC to: 1) resolve conflicts with friends and family members; 2) negotiate stressful interactions with parole agents and SAT program staff; and 3) give empathy to themselves, although self-empathy was the most difficult skill for most participants to master. <br/>IMPLICATIONS: These findings indicate the beneficial impact that NVC training had on participants' levels of empathy and empathic communication skills. They reveal a high rate of acceptance of NVC among participants and demonstrate participants' ability to employ NVC skills during challenging interpersonal interactions. RESULTS: from this study suggest that NVC training may be an efficacious intervention for improving paroled individuals' communication and coping skills and may positively influence participants' reintegration efforts, particularly in developing supportive relationships with others. <br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:58:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:58:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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