CORRELATES OF INSOMNIA IN WOMEN AFTER COMPLETION OF PRIMARY BREAST CANCER TREATMENT

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157555
Type:
Presentation
Title:
CORRELATES OF INSOMNIA IN WOMEN AFTER COMPLETION OF PRIMARY BREAST CANCER TREATMENT
Abstract:
CORRELATES OF INSOMNIA IN WOMEN AFTER COMPLETION OF PRIMARY BREAST CANCER TREATMENT
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:Matthews, Ellyn, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Colorado Denver
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:13120 East 19th Ave, Aurora, CO, 80045, USA
Co-Authors:Michaela McCarthy
RATIONALE/BACKGROUND: Chronic insomnia is a highly prevalent and distressing symptom, particularly in breast cancer patients.
PURPOSE/AIMS: This presentation is reporting preliminary baseline data from a study testing behavioral therapies for insomnia in women after primary treatment for breast cancer. The main goal of this presentation is to address the factors associated with clinical insomnia in a sample of breast cancer survivors.
METHODS: Women aged 21-65, between 1-36 months following primary breast cancer treatment who meet the criteria for chronic insomnia, were recruited from two Western U.S. Cancer Centers and community support groups. Sleep parameters, mood, and cognitive functioning, among other characteristics were assessed prior to behavioral insomnia therapy. Participants completed self-report instruments with established reliability in cancer populations including the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and Attentional Function Index (AFI). The 7-item ISI using a 0-4 Likert scale, provides a quantitative evaluation of insomnia perception by targeting the symptoms (e.g., difficulty falling asleep, staying asleep) and consequences of insomnia as well as the degree of concern and distress experienced by the respondent. ISI scores range from 0-28 with higher scores representing more severe insomnia. The HADS is a 14-item, 0-4 Likert scale. Anxiety and depression are measured by summing the scores each 7- items subscale. The total HADS score is the sum of all 14 items (0-21 range). The AFI assesses perceived effectiveness of cognitive functioning in daily life. Respondents rate themselves on 14 items anchored with polar opposite phrases ranging from 0 (not at all) to 100 (extremely well) in response to how well they were functioning in key cognitive activities such as making decisions, and keeping a train of thought.
RESULTS: Women ranged in age from 35-65 (M = 52.7 years, SD = 6.4). The overall average score of the ISI was 16.9 (SD =3.9) which implies that these women had clinical insomnia of moderate severity. Specifically, women reported on the ISI that difficulty staying asleep was their primary problem (M = 2.6, SD = .98). Women also reported sleep problems interfered with daily functioning (M = 2.57, SD = 1.0) and high dissatisfaction with their current sleep pattern (M = 3.34, SD = .54). Several factors correlated with insomnia as measured by the total ISI scores such individual items relate to cognitive functioning on the AFI and anxiety and depression on the HADS. For example, women with higher levels of insomnia had difficulty keeping their minds on what others are saying (r = .48, p < .01) and remembering to do all the things they started out to do (r = .48, p < .01). Items such as ôWorry thoughts going through my mindö on the HADS were strongly correlated with insomnia severity (r = .55, p < .01).
IMPLICATIONS: Insomnia has a significant impact on the daily lives of women with breast cancer and it is particularly difficult for women to maintain sleep. Additional findings and implications will be discussed in greater detail during the presentation.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCORRELATES OF INSOMNIA IN WOMEN AFTER COMPLETION OF PRIMARY BREAST CANCER TREATMENTen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157555-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">CORRELATES OF INSOMNIA IN WOMEN AFTER COMPLETION OF PRIMARY BREAST CANCER TREATMENT</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Matthews, Ellyn, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Colorado Denver</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">13120 East 19th Ave, Aurora, CO, 80045, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Ellyn.Matthews@ucdenver.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Michaela McCarthy</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">RATIONALE/BACKGROUND: Chronic insomnia is a highly prevalent and distressing symptom, particularly in breast cancer patients. <br/>PURPOSE/AIMS: This presentation is reporting preliminary baseline data from a study testing behavioral therapies for insomnia in women after primary treatment for breast cancer. The main goal of this presentation is to address the factors associated with clinical insomnia in a sample of breast cancer survivors. <br/>METHODS: Women aged 21-65, between 1-36 months following primary breast cancer treatment who meet the criteria for chronic insomnia, were recruited from two Western U.S. Cancer Centers and community support groups. Sleep parameters, mood, and cognitive functioning, among other characteristics were assessed prior to behavioral insomnia therapy. Participants completed self-report instruments with established reliability in cancer populations including the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and Attentional Function Index (AFI). The 7-item ISI using a 0-4 Likert scale, provides a quantitative evaluation of insomnia perception by targeting the symptoms (e.g., difficulty falling asleep, staying asleep) and consequences of insomnia as well as the degree of concern and distress experienced by the respondent. ISI scores range from 0-28 with higher scores representing more severe insomnia. The HADS is a 14-item, 0-4 Likert scale. Anxiety and depression are measured by summing the scores each 7- items subscale. The total HADS score is the sum of all 14 items (0-21 range). The AFI assesses perceived effectiveness of cognitive functioning in daily life. Respondents rate themselves on 14 items anchored with polar opposite phrases ranging from 0 (not at all) to 100 (extremely well) in response to how well they were functioning in key cognitive activities such as making decisions, and keeping a train of thought. <br/>RESULTS: Women ranged in age from 35-65 (M = 52.7 years, SD = 6.4). The overall average score of the ISI was 16.9 (SD =3.9) which implies that these women had clinical insomnia of moderate severity. Specifically, women reported on the ISI that difficulty staying asleep was their primary problem (M = 2.6, SD = .98). Women also reported sleep problems interfered with daily functioning (M = 2.57, SD = 1.0) and high dissatisfaction with their current sleep pattern (M = 3.34, SD = .54). Several factors correlated with insomnia as measured by the total ISI scores such individual items relate to cognitive functioning on the AFI and anxiety and depression on the HADS. For example, women with higher levels of insomnia had difficulty keeping their minds on what others are saying (r = .48, p &lt; .01) and remembering to do all the things they started out to do (r = .48, p &lt; .01). Items such as &ocirc;Worry thoughts going through my mind&ouml; on the HADS were strongly correlated with insomnia severity (r = .55, p &lt; .01). <br/>IMPLICATIONS: Insomnia has a significant impact on the daily lives of women with breast cancer and it is particularly difficult for women to maintain sleep. Additional findings and implications will be discussed in greater detail during the presentation.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:58:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:58:52Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.