PHYSICAL ACTIVITY TO REDUCE FRAILTY RISK AND FALLS: A REVIEW OF INTERVENTION RESEARCH

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157558
Type:
Presentation
Title:
PHYSICAL ACTIVITY TO REDUCE FRAILTY RISK AND FALLS: A REVIEW OF INTERVENTION RESEARCH
Abstract:
PHYSICAL ACTIVITY TO REDUCE FRAILTY RISK AND FALLS: A REVIEW OF INTERVENTION RESEARCH
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2010
Author:McMahon, Siobhan, MSN, MPH, GNP-BC
P.I. Institution Name:Arizona State University
Title:PhD student
Contact Address:500 North 3rd Street, Phoenix, AZ, 85004, USA
Co-Authors:Julie Fleury
PURPOSES/AIMS:
The objectives of this paper were to (a) review and evaluate intervention studies designed to promote physical activity for the prevention of falls among community dwelling older adults, and (b) provide recommendations for future research involving older adults in physical activity intervention programs for fall prevention.
RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND:
The growing number of falls and related injuries among older adults continues to be a major public health concern. The negative impact of falls on life quality and health care cost is significant. Potential consequences include fractures, fear of falling, emergency room and hospital admissions, dependence, confusion, immobilization, depression, and death. Physical activity is a proven preventive strategy, yet the majority of older adults in the United States have sedentary lifestyles, and the rate of falls continues to increase.
METHODS:
Computer and manual searches were conducted of articles in the English-language literature from 1980-2008. Studies whose interventions did not demonstrate a positive effect on any of the targeted outcomes were excluded from this review as the focus was to gain better understanding of interventions with empirical support. Studies taking place in long-term care settings were also excluded because their participants had higher risks of falling and higher rates of frailty than community dwelling older adults. A total of 52 research reports were reviewed; 13 studies that met the inclusion criteria were retrieved and analyzed. A coding frame was developed and refined to record RESULTS: of primary studies, study participants, study methods, and interventions.
RESULTS:
The majority of study participants in the research reviewed for this paper were White, between the ages of 71 to 84, educated and living in urban community settings. Each intervention reviewed included strengthening and balance exercises. Many studies also addressed flexibility and endurance activities. Other intervention specifics such as interventionist characteristics and training methods varied. A number of studies reviewed emphasized education as influencing psychosocial dynamics, physical activity behavior, and fear of falling. Few studies reviewed for this paper explicitly identified theoretical bases. The outcomes of this review document that a variety of physical activity interventions have positive effects in group based and home settings.
IMPLICATIONS: While the evidence is clear that physical activity effectively reduces frailty risk and falls, questions remain regarding intervention content such as behavioral components essential for the adoption of physical activity and its continuation over time. Differences in populations targeted, outcomes measured, intervention strategies used, and attention to theory make it difficult to draw conclusions about the long-term effectiveness of physical activity interventions in the prevention of falls. A review of the current fall prevention research identifies strengths and limitations of existing interventions providing a starting point for determining salient approaches for their expansion and evaluation, and to program implementation and sustainability.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePHYSICAL ACTIVITY TO REDUCE FRAILTY RISK AND FALLS: A REVIEW OF INTERVENTION RESEARCHen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157558-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">PHYSICAL ACTIVITY TO REDUCE FRAILTY RISK AND FALLS: A REVIEW OF INTERVENTION RESEARCH</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McMahon, Siobhan, MSN, MPH, GNP-BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arizona State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">PhD student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">500 North 3rd Street, Phoenix, AZ, 85004, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">siobhan.mcmahon@asu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Julie Fleury</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSES/AIMS: <br/>The objectives of this paper were to (a) review and evaluate intervention studies designed to promote physical activity for the prevention of falls among community dwelling older adults, and (b) provide recommendations for future research involving older adults in physical activity intervention programs for fall prevention. <br/>RATIONALE/CONCEPTUAL BASIS/BACKGROUND: <br/>The growing number of falls and related injuries among older adults continues to be a major public health concern. The negative impact of falls on life quality and health care cost is significant. Potential consequences include fractures, fear of falling, emergency room and hospital admissions, dependence, confusion, immobilization, depression, and death. Physical activity is a proven preventive strategy, yet the majority of older adults in the United States have sedentary lifestyles, and the rate of falls continues to increase. <br/>METHODS: <br/>Computer and manual searches were conducted of articles in the English-language literature from 1980-2008. Studies whose interventions did not demonstrate a positive effect on any of the targeted outcomes were excluded from this review as the focus was to gain better understanding of interventions with empirical support. Studies taking place in long-term care settings were also excluded because their participants had higher risks of falling and higher rates of frailty than community dwelling older adults. A total of 52 research reports were reviewed; 13 studies that met the inclusion criteria were retrieved and analyzed. A coding frame was developed and refined to record RESULTS: of primary studies, study participants, study methods, and interventions. <br/>RESULTS: <br/>The majority of study participants in the research reviewed for this paper were White, between the ages of 71 to 84, educated and living in urban community settings. Each intervention reviewed included strengthening and balance exercises. Many studies also addressed flexibility and endurance activities. Other intervention specifics such as interventionist characteristics and training methods varied. A number of studies reviewed emphasized education as influencing psychosocial dynamics, physical activity behavior, and fear of falling. Few studies reviewed for this paper explicitly identified theoretical bases. The outcomes of this review document that a variety of physical activity interventions have positive effects in group based and home settings. <br/>IMPLICATIONS: While the evidence is clear that physical activity effectively reduces frailty risk and falls, questions remain regarding intervention content such as behavioral components essential for the adoption of physical activity and its continuation over time. Differences in populations targeted, outcomes measured, intervention strategies used, and attention to theory make it difficult to draw conclusions about the long-term effectiveness of physical activity interventions in the prevention of falls. A review of the current fall prevention research identifies strengths and limitations of existing interventions providing a starting point for determining salient approaches for their expansion and evaluation, and to program implementation and sustainability.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:59:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:59:02Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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