2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157566
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Comparison of Psychosocial Factors Among Ethnic Minorities With Heart Failure
Abstract:
Comparison of Psychosocial Factors Among Ethnic Minorities With Heart Failure
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Moughrabi, Samira, PhDc
P.I. Institution Name:University of California, Los Angeles, School of Nursing
Title:Doctoral Candidate
Contact Address:3-653 Factor Bldg, Box 956917, Los Angeles, CA, 90095-6917, USA
Contact Telephone:818-825-6424
Co-Authors:Lorraine S. Evangelista, RN, PhD, Professor; Alvina Ter-Galstanyan, MPH, Student
Background: Although major progress has been made in understanding cardiovascular disease and its risk factors for African Americans, research is still sparse in studying the burden of disease in the Hispanic population.  The purpose of this study was to examine and compare the incidence of anxiety and depression in a cohort of non-Hispanic Blacks (NHB), Hispanics (H), and non-Hispanic White (NHW) adults with advanced systolic heart failure (HF). Additionally, as psychological distress is a common phenomenon in patients with HF, the current study also tested the hypothesis that low levels of perceived control, financial stability, and emotional support (i.e. presence of someone in whom to confide) are associated with the development of anxiety and depression. Methods: Data were collected from 241 patients from a single HF clinic using the Brief Symptom Inventory-Anxiety, the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 Depression Scale, and the Control Attitude Scale to report anxiety, depression, and perceived control scores, respectively. To measure financial stability and emotional support, patients were asked: 1) how well their household income allowed them to make ends meet, and 2) whether they had someone in whom to confide. Results:  Patients reported a mean age of 57 (SD 13) years, male (70%), married (81%), retired (75%), 7% NHB, 22.8% H, 60.7% NHW, and NYHA Class III (53.9%) with mean LVEF, 31.2 (SD 5.4).  Thirty eight of the participants scored above the normative level for anxiety, and 19.9%, above the normative level for depression. In a multivariate analysis, perceived control (odds ratio [OR] =.890; 95% confidence interval [CI] =.827 -.957, p=.002) and depression (OR=1.229; 95% CI=1.143 - 1.321, p< .001) were independent predictors of anxiety. Perceived control (OR=.892; 95% CI=.814-.977, p=.014), financial stability (OR=2.511; 95% CI=1.345-4.686, p=.004), presence of someone to confide in (OR=.921; 95% CI=.873-.972, p=.003), and anxiety (OR=1.842; 95% CI=1.298 2.614, p=.001) were independent predictors of depression. Conclusion: Ethnic differences were noted in levels of anxiety, depression, and perceived control. Our findings also indicate that low levels of perceived control, financial stability, and the presence of someone in whom to confide in are associated with anxiety and depression in HF patients. Since patient perceptions of control as well as financial and emotional support are related to dysphorias known to influence morbidity and mortality, clinicians should regularly access patients? concerns and assist in accessing appropriate services and treatments tailored to individual needs.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComparison of Psychosocial Factors Among Ethnic Minorities With Heart Failureen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157566-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Comparison of Psychosocial Factors Among Ethnic Minorities With Heart Failure</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Moughrabi, Samira, PhDc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California, Los Angeles, School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Candidate</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">3-653 Factor Bldg, Box 956917, Los Angeles, CA, 90095-6917, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">818-825-6424</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">smoghrabi@gmail.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Lorraine S. Evangelista, RN, PhD, Professor; Alvina Ter-Galstanyan, MPH, Student</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Although major progress has been made in understanding cardiovascular disease and its risk factors for African Americans, research is still sparse in studying the burden of disease in the Hispanic population.&nbsp; The purpose of this study was to examine and compare the incidence of anxiety and depression in a cohort of non-Hispanic Blacks (NHB), Hispanics (H), and non-Hispanic White (NHW) adults with advanced systolic heart failure (HF). Additionally, as psychological distress is a common phenomenon in patients with HF, the current study also tested the hypothesis that low levels of perceived control, financial stability, and emotional support (i.e. presence of someone in whom to confide) are associated with the development of anxiety and depression. Methods: Data were collected from 241 patients from a single HF clinic using the Brief Symptom Inventory-Anxiety, the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 Depression Scale, and the Control Attitude Scale to report anxiety, depression, and perceived control scores, respectively. To measure financial stability and emotional support, patients were asked: 1) how well their household income allowed them to make ends meet, and 2) whether they had someone in whom to confide. Results:&nbsp; Patients reported a mean age of 57 (SD 13) years, male (70%), married (81%), retired (75%), 7% NHB, 22.8% H, 60.7% NHW, and NYHA Class III (53.9%) with mean LVEF, 31.2 (SD 5.4).&nbsp; Thirty eight of the participants scored above the normative level for anxiety, and 19.9%, above the normative level for depression. In a multivariate analysis, perceived control (odds ratio [OR] =.890; 95% confidence interval [CI] =.827 -.957, p=.002) and depression (OR=1.229; 95% CI=1.143 - 1.321, p&lt; .001) were independent predictors of anxiety. Perceived control (OR=.892; 95% CI=.814-.977, p=.014), financial stability (OR=2.511; 95% CI=1.345-4.686, p=.004), presence of someone to confide in (OR=.921; 95% CI=.873-.972, p=.003), and anxiety (OR=1.842; 95% CI=1.298 2.614, p=.001) were independent predictors of depression. Conclusion: Ethnic differences were noted in levels of anxiety, depression, and perceived control. Our findings also indicate that low levels of perceived control, financial stability, and the presence of someone in whom to confide in are associated with anxiety and depression in HF patients. Since patient perceptions of control as well as financial and emotional support are related to dysphorias known to influence morbidity and mortality, clinicians should regularly access patients? concerns and assist in accessing appropriate services and treatments tailored to individual needs.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:59:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:59:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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