A Comparative Study of Women Incarcerated for Filicide or Abuse of Their Children

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157567
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Comparative Study of Women Incarcerated for Filicide or Abuse of Their Children
Abstract:
A Comparative Study of Women Incarcerated for Filicide or Abuse of Their Children
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Mugavin, Marie e., PhD, APRN-BC
P.I. Institution Name:University of New Mexico, College of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:MSC05 3340, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 87131-0001, USA
Contact Telephone:505-379-8257
Co-Authors:Anthony P.M. Coxon, PhD, Emeritus Professor of Sociological Research Methods; Honorary Professorial Research Fellow
Background: Exposure to childhood trauma influences an individual's future emotional and behavioral responses and can increase the potential for abuse to be carried forward to the next generation. Literature describes vulnerabilities and triggers that may predispose a woman to abuse, but has yet to reveal in an unbiased manner, complex structural information underlying these factors that may be relevant to their prediction. Methods: The objective of this exploratory study was to investigate potential contributory vulnerabilities and triggers from the viewpoint of women incarcerated for fatal (n=10) and nonfatal (n=9) child abuse.  In a structured questionnaire 68 pairwise comparisons of 12 stimuli was used to investigate vulnerabilities (ie: close to mom, alcohol/drug use, physical abuse) and triggers (ie: revenge, religiosity, desperation) preceding abuse. Multidimensional scaling and associated techniques were employed to develop cognitive maps of the stimuli in relation to one another and to investigate similarities between women who committed filicide and abuse. Results: The positioning of points in the maps was similar between fatal and nonfatal abusers, but significant differences also occur and these are evaluated. Three clusters were identified: Family Intimacy, Negative Emotion, and Abuse. The two groups diverged to a degree in terms of rankings of importance of priorities.  The terms that showed the greatest discrimination between groups were close to mom and physical abuse (filicides > nonfatal abusers) and alcohol or drug use (nonfatal mothers > filicidal mothers). Implications: The study identified potential vulnerabilities and triggers which may help to discriminate between mothers who kill their children compared with mothers who abused or neglected, but did not kill their children.  Such findings may lead to instrument development for use in clinical settings to guide preventive intervention.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Comparative Study of Women Incarcerated for Filicide or Abuse of Their Childrenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157567-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Comparative Study of Women Incarcerated for Filicide or Abuse of Their Children</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mugavin, Marie e., PhD, APRN-BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of New Mexico, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">MSC05 3340, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 87131-0001, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">505-379-8257</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">memugavin@salud.unm.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Anthony P.M. Coxon, PhD, Emeritus Professor of Sociological Research Methods; Honorary Professorial Research Fellow</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Exposure to childhood trauma influences an individual's future emotional and behavioral responses and can increase the potential for abuse to be carried forward to the next generation. Literature describes vulnerabilities and triggers that may predispose a woman to abuse, but has yet to reveal in an unbiased manner, complex structural information underlying these factors that may be relevant to their prediction. Methods: The objective of this exploratory study was to investigate potential contributory vulnerabilities and triggers from the viewpoint of women incarcerated for fatal (n=10) and nonfatal (n=9) child abuse.&nbsp; In a structured questionnaire 68 pairwise comparisons of 12 stimuli was used to investigate vulnerabilities (ie: close to mom, alcohol/drug use, physical abuse) and triggers (ie: revenge, religiosity, desperation) preceding abuse. Multidimensional scaling and associated techniques were employed to develop cognitive maps of the stimuli in relation to one another and to investigate similarities between women who committed filicide and abuse. Results: The positioning of points in the maps was similar between fatal and nonfatal abusers, but significant differences also occur and these are evaluated. Three clusters were identified: Family Intimacy, Negative Emotion, and Abuse. The two groups diverged to a degree in terms of rankings of importance of priorities.&nbsp; The terms that showed the greatest discrimination between groups were close to mom and physical abuse (filicides &gt; nonfatal abusers) and alcohol or drug use (nonfatal mothers &gt; filicidal mothers). Implications: The study identified potential vulnerabilities and triggers which may help to discriminate between mothers who kill their children compared with mothers who abused or neglected, but did not kill their children.&nbsp; Such findings may lead to instrument development for use in clinical settings to guide preventive intervention.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:59:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:59:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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