2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157568
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Toward a System for Ethical Research Involving Prisoners
Abstract:
Toward a System for Ethical Research Involving Prisoners
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Mugavin, Marie E., PhD, APRN-BC
P.I. Institution Name:University of New Mexico, College of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:MSC05 3340, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 87131-0001, USA
Contact Telephone:505-379-8257
Background: Major pharmaceutical companies, the U.S. military and other sponsors have a history of conducting a wide variety of research on prisoners?a captive, vulnerable, and easily accessible population. Up to the early 1970?s approximately 90% of all pharmaceutical research was conducted on prisoners.  These individuals were also subjected to biochemical research, ranging from testing diet drinks to studies involving chemical warfare. The National Commission for the Protection of Human Subjects of Biomedical and Behavioral Research was formed as knowledge of the exploitation of prisoners began to emerge. In 2007, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) evaluated the need for a new ethical framework for prisoner research and for the enhancement of regulatory safeguards. The additional safeguards could lead to beneficial research, helping to find answers to the most intractable problems in institutions, such as HIV/AIDS, hepatitis C, tuberculosis, mental illness, and substance abuse. Methods: Review and synthesis of the professional literature related to research involving prisoners, federal regulations, and guidelines in the United States, incorporating the author?s experience with presenting these arguments while conducting prison research and as a member of a Human Research Review Committee. Results:  Realizing a balance between the promotion of beneficial research and safeguarding prisoners is challenging and politically contentious. Although the history of prisoner exploitation cautions against allowing research, modern science may be able to improve understanding of the recalcitrant problems faced by prisoners, including mental illness and the treatment of substance abuse, and the efficacy of programs intended to help prisoners successfully transition back into the community. Such research benefits prisoners and the broader community, because 95% of prisoners will eventually be released from prison. A comprehensive and rigorous continuum of safeguards is required to protect this vulnerable population against abuse. The IOM believes the following would provide such a system of safeguards while allowing responsible research: expanding the definition of prisoner; ensuring universal, consistent ethical protection; creating a national database of prisoner research; shifting from category-based to risk-benefit approach to research review; updating the ethical framework to include collaborative responsibility; and enhancing systematic oversight of research. Implications: With the proper safeguards in place, social science research and clinical trials could both benefit the public and provide access to high-quality medical care for suffering prisoners. Unequivocal prohibition of research based on a reprehensible history of exploitation would leave prisoners without the benefits of modern science that could enhance the quality of their lives and those conditions unique to prisoners. With systematic oversight, human dignity and scientific progress need not be incompatible.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleToward a System for Ethical Research Involving Prisonersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157568-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Toward a System for Ethical Research Involving Prisoners</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mugavin, Marie E., PhD, APRN-BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of New Mexico, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">MSC05 3340, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 87131-0001, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">505-379-8257</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">memugavin@salud.unm.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Major pharmaceutical companies, the U.S. military and other sponsors have a history of conducting a wide variety of research on prisoners?a captive, vulnerable, and easily accessible population. Up to the early 1970?s approximately 90% of all pharmaceutical research was conducted on prisoners.&nbsp; These individuals were also subjected to biochemical research, ranging from testing diet drinks to studies involving chemical warfare. The National Commission for the Protection of Human Subjects of Biomedical and Behavioral Research was formed as knowledge of the exploitation of prisoners began to emerge. In 2007, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) evaluated the need for a new ethical framework for prisoner research and for the enhancement of regulatory safeguards. The additional safeguards could lead to beneficial research, helping to find answers to the most intractable problems in institutions, such as HIV/AIDS, hepatitis C, tuberculosis, mental illness, and substance abuse. Methods: Review and synthesis of the professional literature related to research involving prisoners, federal regulations, and guidelines in the United States, incorporating the author?s experience with presenting these arguments while conducting prison research and as a member of a Human Research Review Committee. Results: &nbsp;Realizing a balance between the promotion of beneficial research and safeguarding prisoners is challenging and politically contentious. Although the history of prisoner exploitation cautions against allowing research, modern science may be able to improve understanding of the recalcitrant problems faced by prisoners, including mental illness and the treatment of substance abuse, and the efficacy of programs intended to help prisoners successfully transition back into the community. Such research benefits prisoners and the broader community, because 95% of prisoners will eventually be released from prison. A comprehensive and rigorous continuum of safeguards is required to protect this vulnerable population against abuse. The IOM believes the following would provide such a system of safeguards while allowing responsible research: expanding the definition of prisoner; ensuring universal, consistent ethical protection; creating a national database of prisoner research; shifting from category-based to risk-benefit approach to research review; updating the ethical framework to include collaborative responsibility; and enhancing systematic oversight of research. Implications: With the proper safeguards in place, social science research and clinical trials could both benefit the public and provide access to high-quality medical care for suffering prisoners. Unequivocal prohibition of research based on a reprehensible history of exploitation would leave prisoners without the benefits of modern science that could enhance the quality of their lives and those conditions unique to prisoners. With systematic oversight, human dignity and scientific progress need not be incompatible.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:59:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:59:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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