2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157570
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cortisol: A Measure of Stress
Abstract:
Cortisol: A Measure of Stress
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Neu, Madalynn, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Colorado Denver, College of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:13120 East 19th Avenue, Room 4322, P.O. Box 6511, Aurora, CO, 80045, USA
Contact Telephone:303-724-8550
Co-Authors:Mark Laudenslager, Professor and Director
Background/Purpose: Cortisol is a common indicator of the Hypothalamic-Pituitary Adrenocorticol (HPA) system and typically is used to examine responses to stress. The HPA system is activated during periods of stress and also has a diurnal pattern that may be affected by stress. This paper discusses the collection and measurement of cortisol. Measurement Description: Cortisol levels can be obtained from plasma, saliva, urine, and hair. Plasma levels reflect total cortisol, both bound to glucocorticoid binding globulin and other proteins as well as unbound cortisol. Unbound cortisol is thought to be biologically active though measurement of free cortisol in plasma is difficult. Radioimmunoassays (RIA) have traditionally been used to determine total cortisol in plasma but exposure to radioactivity is a risk. Salivary cortisol is more commonly accepted today. It is easier to collect than plasma cortisol and reflects only unbound cortisol. Saliva levels correlate highly with plasma levels. The assay typically used for salivary cortisol is an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that has many of the advantages of RIA (e.g., sensitivity, ease of handling multiple samples) without the disadvantages of dealing with radioactivity. One popular kit for saliva assessments is supplied by Salimetrics (EIA kit No. 1-3002/1-3012) that detects cortisol levels in the range of .003 - 3.0 microg/dl. Standard curves can be fitted by regression analysis using commercial software that come with the ELISA plate reader. From these curves, unknown values are computed. This kit shows minimal cross reactivity with other steroids present in the saliva. Salivary cortisol levels are not affected by saliva flow rate but timing, diet, smoking and drug therapy, should be considered in collecting salivary cortisol. Urine cortisol also reflects unbound cortisol levels and is collected overnight or over 24 hours. Levels are affected by amount of urine secretion and much corrected using creatinine clearance rates. Recently hair has been used to determine cumulative cortisol levels over a period of several months. Approximately 100 hair strands are required and cut close to the scalp. The strands are pulverized, extracted in methanol, and the extracted cortisol is assayed by ELISA technique. Cortisol is relatively easy to collect, but assays can be rather expensive. Standard lab equipment includes an ELISA plate reader. Other costs include collection materials and assay kits. An assay tray holds 96 samples, but samples are run in duplicate and standards are included, so that 38 samples are typically run per assay. Applications: Clinical applications for use of cortisol are vast. Samples can be obtained from adults, children, and infants in the hospital or community and in distal or proximal settings. The presenter has studied cortisol levels in preterm infants which require special collection techniques. Research focuses on co-regulation in mother-infant saliva and environmental influences on this co-regulation. Animal and adult research by the co-author includes study of cortisol levels from hair as a marker of stress in postpartum women. Conclusions: Examining HPA function is possible via the use of cortisol. A variety of collection methods makes cortisol collection feasible in many situations. Assays are standard and can be performed by most labs.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCortisol: A Measure of Stressen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157570-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Cortisol: A Measure of Stress</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Neu, Madalynn, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Colorado Denver, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">13120 East 19th Avenue, Room 4322, P.O. Box 6511, Aurora, CO, 80045, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">303-724-8550</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">madalynn.neu@ucdenver.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Mark Laudenslager, Professor and Director</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background/Purpose: Cortisol is a common indicator of the Hypothalamic-Pituitary Adrenocorticol (HPA) system and typically is used to examine responses to stress. The HPA system is activated during periods of stress and also has a diurnal pattern that may be affected by stress. This paper discusses the collection and measurement of cortisol. Measurement Description: Cortisol levels can be obtained from plasma, saliva, urine, and hair. Plasma levels reflect total cortisol, both bound to glucocorticoid binding globulin and other proteins as well as unbound cortisol. Unbound cortisol is thought to be biologically active though measurement of free cortisol in plasma is difficult. Radioimmunoassays (RIA) have traditionally been used to determine total cortisol in plasma but exposure to radioactivity is a risk. Salivary cortisol is more commonly accepted today. It is easier to collect than plasma cortisol and reflects only unbound cortisol. Saliva levels correlate highly with plasma levels. The assay typically used for salivary cortisol is an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that has many of the advantages of RIA (e.g., sensitivity, ease of handling multiple samples) without the disadvantages of dealing with radioactivity. One popular kit for saliva assessments is supplied by Salimetrics (EIA kit No. 1-3002/1-3012) that detects cortisol levels in the range of .003 - 3.0 microg/dl. Standard curves can be fitted by regression analysis using commercial software that come with the ELISA plate reader. From these curves, unknown values are computed. This kit shows minimal cross reactivity with other steroids present in the saliva. Salivary cortisol levels are not affected by saliva flow rate but timing, diet, smoking and drug therapy, should be considered in collecting salivary cortisol. Urine cortisol also reflects unbound cortisol levels and is collected overnight or over 24 hours. Levels are affected by amount of urine secretion and much corrected using creatinine clearance rates. Recently hair has been used to determine cumulative cortisol levels over a period of several months. Approximately 100 hair strands are required and cut close to the scalp. The strands are pulverized, extracted in methanol, and the extracted cortisol is assayed by ELISA technique. Cortisol is relatively easy to collect, but assays can be rather expensive. Standard lab equipment includes an ELISA plate reader. Other costs include collection materials and assay kits. An assay tray holds 96 samples, but samples are run in duplicate and standards are included, so that 38 samples are typically run per assay. Applications: Clinical applications for use of cortisol are vast. Samples can be obtained from adults, children, and infants in the hospital or community and in distal or proximal settings. The presenter has studied cortisol levels in preterm infants which require special collection techniques. Research focuses on co-regulation in mother-infant saliva and environmental influences on this co-regulation. Animal and adult research by the co-author includes study of cortisol levels from hair as a marker of stress in postpartum women. Conclusions: Examining HPA function is possible via the use of cortisol. A variety of collection methods makes cortisol collection feasible in many situations. Assays are standard and can be performed by most labs.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:59:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:59:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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