Health Status and Readiness in a Community-Based Intervention Among Rural Older Adults

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157574
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health Status and Readiness in a Community-Based Intervention Among Rural Older Adults
Abstract:
Health Status and Readiness in a Community-Based Intervention Among Rural Older Adults
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Noone, Joanne, PhD, RN, FNP
P.I. Institution Name:Oregon Health and Science University, School of Nursing - Ashland Campus
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:1250 Siskiyou Boulevard, Ashland, OR, 97520, USA
Contact Telephone:541-552-8453
Co-Authors:Tiffany L. Allen, BS, Senior Research Assistant; Theresa Johnston-Duer, RN, BSN, Clinical Case Manager; Heather M. Young, PhD, RN, FAAN, Associate Vice Chancellor of Nursing; Erva M. Zabel RN, HNC, Clinical Case Manager
Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present a baseline profile of the health status and interest of participants who enrolled in a community-based intervention to evaluate a chronic disease self-management program in improving the capacity of rural older adults at high-risk of cardiovascular disease to manage their health. Rationale/Background/Conceptual Framework: Adult Oregonians have significant risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Overwhelming evidence suggests that cardiovascular disease can be prevented and/or modified through risk reduction activities. A chronic disease self-management series was evaluated based on the evidence-based Stanford University curriculum. In previous research, primarily done in university settings rather than community settings, the chronic disease self management classes have demonstrated: (1) increased self-efficacy in the participants, (2) reduced emergency room use, and (3) improved health status. This study implemented the program in a rural, community-based setting. Methods: A sample of 204 was recruited from patients admitted to two hospitals in Jackson or Josephine Counties for a cardiac condition and who resided in a rural community (as determined by criteria of the Oregon Office of Rural Health). Eligibility criteria included being English-speaking, living in a rural community, and having cardiovascular disease. After agreeing to participate, participants were randomized to one of two groups: the first received written information about health promotion and self-management of cardiac disease; the second group was referred to a six-class chronic-disease management series. This repeated measure, pre- and post-intervention study examined a variety of health indicators. For both groups, the evaluation included a health survey upon enrollment and after 6 and 12 weeks. Results: The study had a 21% recruitment success, despite the fact that participants were older and had recently been hospitalized. Completed baseline data demonstrated significant health issues in this sample of rural older adults. Participants had a mean of 2.49 chronic conditions and, on average, took eight medications. Seventy-eight percent were overweight or obese. In general, the group was sedentary with moderate limitations to their activities of daily living due to their health. Implications: The participants who enrolled in this study were well suited for the targeted intervention of a chronic disease self-management program. Despite a recent hospitalization, participants showed strong interest in enrolling in the study.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth Status and Readiness in a Community-Based Intervention Among Rural Older Adultsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157574-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Health Status and Readiness in a Community-Based Intervention Among Rural Older Adults</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Noone, Joanne, PhD, RN, FNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Oregon Health and Science University, School of Nursing - Ashland Campus</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1250 Siskiyou Boulevard, Ashland, OR, 97520, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">541-552-8453</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">noonej@ohsu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Tiffany L. Allen, BS, Senior Research Assistant; Theresa Johnston-Duer, RN, BSN, Clinical Case Manager; Heather M. Young, PhD, RN, FAAN, Associate Vice Chancellor of Nursing; Erva M. Zabel RN, HNC, Clinical Case Manager</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present a baseline profile of the health status and interest of participants who enrolled in a community-based intervention to evaluate a chronic disease self-management program in improving the capacity of rural older adults at high-risk of cardiovascular disease to manage their health. Rationale/Background/Conceptual Framework: Adult Oregonians have significant risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Overwhelming evidence suggests that cardiovascular disease can be prevented and/or modified through risk reduction activities. A chronic disease self-management series was evaluated based on the evidence-based Stanford University curriculum. In previous research, primarily done in university settings rather than community settings, the chronic disease self management classes have demonstrated: (1) increased self-efficacy in the participants, (2) reduced emergency room use, and (3) improved health status. This study implemented the program in a rural, community-based setting. Methods: A sample of 204 was recruited from patients admitted to two hospitals in Jackson or Josephine Counties for a cardiac condition and who resided in a rural community (as determined by criteria of the Oregon Office of Rural Health). Eligibility criteria included being English-speaking, living in a rural community, and having cardiovascular disease. After agreeing to participate, participants were randomized to one of two groups: the first received written information about health promotion and self-management of cardiac disease; the second group was referred to a six-class chronic-disease management series. This repeated measure, pre- and post-intervention study examined a variety of health indicators. For both groups, the evaluation included a health survey upon enrollment and after 6 and 12 weeks. Results: The study had a 21% recruitment success, despite the fact that participants were older and had recently been hospitalized. Completed baseline data demonstrated significant health issues in this sample of rural older adults. Participants had a mean of 2.49 chronic conditions and, on average, took eight medications. Seventy-eight percent were overweight or obese. In general, the group was sedentary with moderate limitations to their activities of daily living due to their health. Implications: The participants who enrolled in this study were well suited for the targeted intervention of a chronic disease self-management program. Despite a recent hospitalization, participants showed strong interest in enrolling in the study.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:59:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:59:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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