Cultural Competence Education and the Future of Nursing: Comparison of Experiences

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157581
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cultural Competence Education and the Future of Nursing: Comparison of Experiences
Abstract:
Cultural Competence Education and the Future of Nursing: Comparison of Experiences
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Palmer, Sheri P., RN, MSN, CEN
P.I. Institution Name:Brigham Young University, College of Nursing
Title:Associate Teaching Professor
Contact Address:Box 500, SWKT, University Hill, Provo, UT, 84604, USA
Contact Telephone:801-592-0565
Co-Authors:Kris Martin, Assistant Teaching Professor; Debbie Mills, Associate Teaching Professor
Purpose: There is a surging interest in cultural competency within the nursing profession,  shown by many states  mandating cultural competence standards for higher education. Keeping up with the demand for culturally competent nurses has placed this challenge upon nursing programs.  With economic, time, and other constraints, methods of teaching cultural competence needs to studied and evaluated. Background: The College of Nursing at Brigham Young University recognized the need to prepare nursing students in providing culturally sensitive, competent nursing care and developed a 7 week Global Health and Diversity course.  This required course incorporates a clinical rotation with concurrent principles of global health and diversity.  Approximately 67% of the students stay within the United States, while 43% travel out of the country for their clinical rotation.  Realizing the great variation between clinical sites and concern regarding students' application of principle, it was imperative to study the differences between the types of experiences.  Current and future constraints, such as limited resources and global conditions, may limit traveling for an immersion experience.  With this in mind, a research study comparing students' perception of their cultural competence was initiated.  Methods/Process: Out of 115 students, two groups of students were delineated for the study, those students who went to an international site for a period of 3-4 weeks, and those students who stayed at local clinical sites along the Wasatch front of Utah.  Within the usual protocols of research, students completed the Caffrey Cultural Competency in Healthcare Scale (CCCHS) pre- and post experience.  Additionally, the participants submitted copies of their reflective writings which were studied for qualitative analysis. Results: According to the CCCHS scale there was no statistical difference between the students at the start of the study.  However, there was statistical differences between students perceived cultural competence from Pre to Post survey (p = .000), there were also statistical differences between those students that go "foreign" and those who do not (p = .034).   Qualitative results also show different cultural experiences and perceptions between students. Implications: Students who went internationally had a higher increase in their self perception of cultural competence.  However, all students progressed in their measured clinical competence.  Our college experience of teaching internationally is largely positive and life changing, yet also comes at a cost (in many ways) for both faculty and students.  As global events, financial issues, and other restraints impact our college, we have seen that teaching cultural competence may be achieved with a variety of methods.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCultural Competence Education and the Future of Nursing: Comparison of Experiencesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157581-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Cultural Competence Education and the Future of Nursing: Comparison of Experiences</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Palmer, Sheri P., RN, MSN, CEN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Brigham Young University, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Teaching Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Box 500, SWKT, University Hill, Provo, UT, 84604, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">801-592-0565</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sheri-palmer@byu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Kris Martin, Assistant Teaching Professor; Debbie Mills, Associate Teaching Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: There is a surging interest in cultural competency within the nursing profession, &nbsp;shown by many states &nbsp;mandating cultural competence standards for higher education. Keeping up with the demand for culturally competent nurses has placed this challenge upon nursing programs. &nbsp;With economic, time, and other constraints, methods of teaching cultural competence needs to studied and evaluated. Background: The College of Nursing at Brigham Young University recognized the need to prepare nursing students in providing culturally sensitive, competent nursing care and developed a 7 week Global Health and Diversity course.&nbsp; This required course incorporates a clinical rotation with concurrent principles of global health and diversity.&nbsp; Approximately 67% of the students stay within the United States, while 43% travel out of the country for their clinical rotation.&nbsp; Realizing the great variation between clinical sites and concern regarding students' application of principle, it was imperative to study the differences between the types of experiences.&nbsp; Current and future constraints, such as limited resources and global conditions, may limit traveling for an immersion experience.&nbsp; With this in mind, a research study comparing students' perception of their cultural competence was initiated.&nbsp;&nbsp;Methods/Process: Out of 115 students, two groups of students were delineated for the study, those students who went to an international site for a period of 3-4 weeks, and those students who stayed at local clinical sites along the Wasatch front of Utah.&nbsp; Within the usual protocols of research, students completed the Caffrey Cultural Competency in Healthcare Scale (CCCHS) pre- and post experience. &nbsp;Additionally, the participants submitted copies of their reflective writings which were studied for qualitative analysis. Results: According to the CCCHS scale there was no statistical difference between the students at the start of the study.&nbsp; However, there was statistical differences between students perceived cultural competence from Pre to Post survey (p = .000), there were also statistical differences between those students that go &quot;foreign&quot; and those who do not (p = .034).&nbsp; &nbsp;Qualitative results also show different cultural experiences and perceptions between students.&nbsp;Implications: Students who went internationally had a higher increase in their self perception of cultural competence.&nbsp; However, all students progressed in their measured clinical competence.&nbsp; Our college experience of teaching internationally is largely positive and life changing, yet also comes at a cost (in many ways) for both faculty and students.&nbsp; As global events, financial issues, and other restraints impact our college, we have seen that teaching cultural competence may be achieved with a variety of methods.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:00:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:00:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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