Implementation and Evaluation of Capacity Building for Simulation Sustainability

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157582
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Implementation and Evaluation of Capacity Building for Simulation Sustainability
Abstract:
Implementation and Evaluation of Capacity Building for Simulation Sustainability
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Pattillo, Robin E., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Idaho State University, Nursing
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:358 South 1000 West, Blackfoot, ID, 83221, USA
Contact Telephone:208-282-4098
Purpose: The purpose of this symposium is to share our ongoing experience of implementing and evaluating simulation sustainability based on an internally developed conceptual framework for capacity building. We will discuss administrative elements of our system, faculty involvement, the actual physical simulation facility, and specific metrics for evaluating outcomes. Background: The Simulation Steering Committee (SSC) developed a conceptual model for capacity building with a goal of sustainability. The model is derived from "Systems Theory" (1). This model was presented in 2008 at WIN. We have since moved forward with the implementation and ongoing evaluation of the model. We approached our model as an open system and examined inter-relating elements of the model on various levels. Process: The SSC began our capacity building through examination of "Input": capital expenditures, existing and desired equipment, and assessment of school and university infrastructure. We analyzed "Throughput" to include existing teaching strategies and university and community collaboration. "Output" was viewed as faculty, student, and community outcomes. These outcomes include student performance in various arenas, faculty development and productivity, and community involvement. As the simulation lab and simulation experiences began to develop, "Input" was altered with new and different technologies and strong administrative support for faculty. These changes modified "Throughput" with development of revised and additional teaching strategies and changing student expectations. The need for formal measurement criteria for each level of the model evolved as we monitored our process and progress. We continue to examine all elements of our model as we move forward with capacity building. Outcomes: As we develop each level of our model we discover additional elements, unpredicted limitations, and often redefine boundaries. Our simulation system remains open, thus we are constantly gathering and exchanging new information (2). This symposium serves to summarize activities and outcomes that we have implemented and evaluated thus far. Feedback leading to revision and/or reinforcement of our conceptual framework emerged throughout implementation of this model. Conclusions & Recommendations: Our capacity building model has proven to be helpful in developing our simulation activities. Our "Output" has proven to provide feedback leading to evaluation of our "Throughput" strategies and further development of our "Input." We believe that other nursing faculties or health care facilities will benefit from applying our model as well as our sharing of our experiences.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImplementation and Evaluation of Capacity Building for Simulation Sustainabilityen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157582-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Implementation and Evaluation of Capacity Building for Simulation Sustainability</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Pattillo, Robin E., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Idaho State University, Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">358 South 1000 West, Blackfoot, ID, 83221, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">208-282-4098</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">pattrobi@isu.edu, rpattillo@bigdoghsi.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this symposium is to share our ongoing experience of implementing and evaluating simulation sustainability based on an internally developed conceptual framework for capacity building. We will discuss administrative elements of our system, faculty involvement, the actual physical simulation facility, and specific metrics for evaluating outcomes. Background: The Simulation Steering Committee (SSC) developed a conceptual model for capacity building with a goal of sustainability. The model is derived from &quot;Systems Theory&quot; (1). This model was presented in 2008 at WIN. We have since moved forward with the implementation and ongoing evaluation of the model. We approached our model as an open system and examined inter-relating elements of the model on various levels. Process: The SSC began our capacity building through examination of &quot;Input&quot;: capital expenditures, existing and desired equipment, and assessment of school and university infrastructure. We analyzed &quot;Throughput&quot; to include existing teaching strategies and university and community collaboration. &quot;Output&quot; was viewed as faculty, student, and community outcomes. These outcomes include student performance in various arenas, faculty development and productivity, and community involvement. As the simulation lab and simulation experiences began to develop, &quot;Input&quot; was altered with new and different technologies and strong administrative support for faculty. These changes modified &quot;Throughput&quot; with development of revised and additional teaching strategies and changing student expectations. The need for formal measurement criteria for each level of the model evolved as we monitored our process and progress. We continue to examine all elements of our model as we move forward with capacity building. Outcomes: As we develop each level of our model we discover additional elements, unpredicted limitations, and often redefine boundaries. Our simulation system remains open, thus we are constantly gathering and exchanging new information (2). This symposium serves to summarize activities and outcomes that we have implemented and evaluated thus far. Feedback leading to revision and/or reinforcement of our conceptual framework emerged throughout implementation of this model. Conclusions &amp; Recommendations: Our capacity building model has proven to be helpful in developing our simulation activities. Our &quot;Output&quot; has proven to provide feedback leading to evaluation of our &quot;Throughput&quot; strategies and further development of our &quot;Input.&quot; We believe that other nursing faculties or health care facilities will benefit from applying our model as well as our sharing of our experiences.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:00:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:00:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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