The Computerized Physical Activity Reporters: Usability in Middle-School Adolescents

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157584
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Computerized Physical Activity Reporters: Usability in Middle-School Adolescents
Abstract:
The Computerized Physical Activity Reporters: Usability in Middle-School Adolescents
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Pearce, Patricia F., MPH, PhD, FNP-BC
P.I. Institution Name:University of Utah, College of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:10 South 2000 East #543, Salt Lake City, UT, 84112-5880, USA
Contact Telephone:801-585-3863
Co-Authors:Jacqueline W. Blaz, Associate Instructor; Matthew D. Gunderson, BS Student; Sarah J. Iribarren, PhD Student; Ryan Pettit, BS Student; Justine J. Reel, PhD, CPCI, Assistant Professor; Sonya SooHoo, PhD
Purpose:  The purpose of this presentation is to discuss the usability evaluation of the Children's Computerized Physical Activity Reporter (C-CPAR), done with 155 middle-school adolescents during a psychometric study comparing the C-CPAR, a paper-based questionnaire, and accelerometry monitoring. The usability evaluation included: (a) the time taken for children to complete the 24-hour self report of physical activity, and (b) a 4-item usability evaluation the adolescents completed after each completed four C-CPAR questionnaires and four paper-based questionnaires over 5-days. Rationale:  In earlier research, the Children's Computerized Physical Activity Reporter (C-CPAR) was designed with children, for children, integrating their understanding of physical activity, as well as the content and questionnaire structure they desired to support their self-reports.  Evaluating the usability of the questionnaire is critical for further use of the C-CPAR.  Methods: A convenience sample of 7th to 9th-grade adolescents (N=155; n=69 females and n=86 males; mean age = 13 years, sd=0.87; range 12-15) in public school participated. The participants were ethnically diverse:  Caucasian (n=71; 46%), Hispanic (n=61; 39%), African-American (n=11; 7%), Native American (n=8; 6%), Asian (n=3; 2%), Pacific Islander (n=1; 0.65%), and unknown 15(9%). Measured height and weight, plus two 24-hour physical activity recalls daily for four days were completed, while each participant wore an accelerometers over the 5-day study period. For the usability evaluation, descriptive statistics were calculated, and content analysis was done for open-ended items, with data managed in Atlas/ti software. Results:  All the children completed the C-CPAR easily. Average C-CPAR report time was 13.5 minutes for a 24-hour report. Overall usability evaluation indicated instructions and completion of the questionnaire were easy (95%), the questionnaire included the activities they wanted to report (86%), and time to report was not too long (87%). The adolescents preferred the computerized questionnaire to the paper-based questionnaire and commented on the ease of using the C-CPAR. Of the Spanish-speaking participants, only 15% opted to use the integrated Spanish version. Implications: Usability of the C-CPAR, with preference for the computerized questionnaire (vs. paper-based questionnaire) was demonstrated with 155, ethnically-diverse middle-school children. Further evaluation of the C-CPAR in schools and ambulatory care environments will be essential in understanding psychometric base and usability in other venues.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Computerized Physical Activity Reporters: Usability in Middle-School Adolescentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157584-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Computerized Physical Activity Reporters: Usability in Middle-School Adolescents</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Pearce, Patricia F., MPH, PhD, FNP-BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Utah, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">10 South 2000 East #543, Salt Lake City, UT, 84112-5880, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">801-585-3863</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Patricia.Pearce@nurs.utah.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jacqueline W. Blaz, Associate Instructor; Matthew D. Gunderson, BS Student; Sarah J. Iribarren, PhD Student; Ryan Pettit, BS Student; Justine J. Reel, PhD, CPCI, Assistant Professor; Sonya SooHoo, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose:&nbsp; The purpose of this presentation is to discuss the usability evaluation of the Children's Computerized Physical Activity Reporter (C-CPAR), done with 155 middle-school adolescents during a psychometric study comparing the C-CPAR, a paper-based questionnaire, and accelerometry monitoring. The usability evaluation included: (a) the time taken for children to complete the 24-hour self report of physical activity, and (b) a 4-item usability evaluation the adolescents completed after each completed four C-CPAR questionnaires and four paper-based questionnaires over 5-days. Rationale:&nbsp; In earlier research, the Children's Computerized Physical Activity Reporter (C-CPAR) was designed with children, for children, integrating their understanding of physical activity, as well as the content and questionnaire structure they desired to support their self-reports.&nbsp; Evaluating the usability of the questionnaire is critical for further use of the C-CPAR.&nbsp; Methods: A convenience sample of 7th to 9th-grade adolescents (N=155; n=69 females and n=86 males; mean age = 13 years, sd=0.87; range 12-15) in public school participated. The participants were ethnically diverse:&nbsp; Caucasian (n=71; 46%), Hispanic (n=61; 39%), African-American (n=11; 7%), Native American (n=8; 6%), Asian (n=3; 2%), Pacific Islander (n=1; 0.65%), and unknown 15(9%). Measured height and weight, plus two 24-hour physical activity recalls daily for four days were completed, while each participant wore an accelerometers over the 5-day study period. For the usability evaluation, descriptive statistics were calculated, and content analysis was done for open-ended items, with data managed in Atlas/ti software. Results: &nbsp;All the children completed the C-CPAR easily. Average C-CPAR report time was 13.5 minutes for a 24-hour report. Overall usability evaluation indicated instructions and completion of the questionnaire were easy (95%), the questionnaire included the activities they wanted to report (86%), and time to report was not too long (87%). The adolescents preferred the computerized questionnaire to the paper-based questionnaire and commented on the ease of using the C-CPAR. Of the Spanish-speaking participants, only 15% opted to use the integrated Spanish version.&nbsp;Implications:&nbsp;Usability of the C-CPAR, with preference for the computerized questionnaire (vs. paper-based questionnaire) was demonstrated with 155, ethnically-diverse middle-school children. Further evaluation of the C-CPAR in schools and ambulatory care environments will be essential in understanding psychometric base and usability in other venues.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:00:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:00:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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