Health Related Quality of Life for Rural Cancer Survivors: The Colorado Experience

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157585
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health Related Quality of Life for Rural Cancer Survivors: The Colorado Experience
Abstract:
Health Related Quality of Life for Rural Cancer Survivors: The Colorado Experience
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Pedro, Leli W., DNSc, RN, C, OCN, CNE
P.I. Institution Name:University of Colorado Denver College of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:13120 East 19th Ave, PO Box 6511, Aurora, CO, 80045, USA
Contact Telephone:303-724-8524
Purpose:  The purpose of this pilot study was to describe the HRQL for LT adult cancer survivors in rural. The pilot study was guided by: Aim 1: Describe the HRQL of long-term cancer survivors in Colorado who are rural dwellers and compare HRQL across levels of rurality; Aim 2: Describe the relationships between the HRQL of long-term cancer survivors and their demographic characteristics; Aim 3: Explore the impact of rurality in mediating the relationship between self-esteem, and social support on the HRQL for long-term cancer survivors. Background: The number of people living with a cancer history cancer is growing steadily. The triumph of surviving cancer and its treatment often is clouded by a spectrum of long-term (LT) and late effects with their accompanying issues. Many issues remain poorly documented and understood in the general population, and more so in medically underserved groups such as rural cancer survivors. Nearly half of Americans live in rural areas, defined as sparsely populated counties that are at some distance from comprehensive healthcare services. Eight-one percent of 64 counties are rural. Although rural residents experience similar life situations as those who live in urban areas, the experience of cancer survivorship is influenced by distinctive rural values and lifestyles. Health related quality of life (HRQL) is an important outcome of cancer survivorship. As the cancer care community broadens its focus to target LT (5 years beyond diagnosis and treatment) cancer survivors, the defining characteristics and prognostic factors for HRQL for rural LT survivors must be described to elucidate the context of their survivorship and inform the design of interventions to ameliorate potentially negative health outcomes. The conceptual framework for this study was derived from Mullen?s ?seasons of survival? and Ferrell et al.?s Quality of Life Model Applied to Cancer Survivors. Methods: This study was descriptive and correlational in nature, using a non-experimental and survey design.  A random, stratified, sample of rural LT cancer survivors living in non-metro counties not adjacent to a metro area or with a population of less than 2,500 were contacted through the Colorado Central Cancer Registry database. Regression models were used to examine the relationships between self-esteem, social support, rurality, and HRQL. Results: The sample of ninety eight LT cancer survivors was predominantly retired, Caucasian, breast and prostate cancer survivors in rural. There were no significant relationships between demographic characteristics and HRQL. Unlike previous studies self-esteem had no significant association with HRQL. A second key finding, the consistent association of social support with HRQL, supports previous cancer survivorship research. The third key finding of this study is the consistent influence of rurality on HRQL for LT cancer survivors. Implications for Practice: An understanding of the impact of rurality on social support and HRQL can inform assessment and planning strategies designed to minimize the risk for poor HRQL of rural cancer survivors. The development of nursing interventions to support the HRQL needs of rural long-term cancer survivors must be relevant to the rural setting.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth Related Quality of Life for Rural Cancer Survivors: The Colorado Experienceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157585-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Health Related Quality of Life for Rural Cancer Survivors: The Colorado Experience</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Pedro, Leli W., DNSc, RN, C, OCN, CNE</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Colorado Denver College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">13120 East 19th Ave, PO Box 6511, Aurora, CO, 80045, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">303-724-8524</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">leli.pedro@ucdenver.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose:&nbsp; The purpose of this pilot study was to describe the HRQL for LT adult cancer survivors in rural. The pilot study was guided by: Aim 1: Describe the HRQL of long-term cancer survivors in Colorado who are rural dwellers and compare HRQL across levels of rurality; Aim 2: Describe the relationships between the HRQL of long-term cancer survivors and their demographic characteristics; Aim 3: Explore the impact of rurality in mediating the relationship between self-esteem, and social support on the HRQL for long-term cancer survivors. Background: The number of people living with a cancer history cancer is growing steadily. The triumph of surviving cancer and its treatment often is clouded by a spectrum of long-term (LT) and late effects with their accompanying issues. Many issues remain poorly documented and understood in the general population, and more so in medically underserved groups such as rural cancer survivors. Nearly half of Americans live in rural areas, defined as sparsely populated counties that are at some distance from comprehensive healthcare services. Eight-one percent of 64 counties are rural. Although rural residents experience similar life situations as those who live in urban areas, the experience of cancer survivorship is influenced by distinctive rural values and lifestyles. Health related quality of life (HRQL) is an important outcome of cancer survivorship. As the cancer care community broadens its focus to target LT (5 years beyond diagnosis and treatment) cancer survivors, the defining characteristics and prognostic factors for HRQL for rural LT survivors must be described to elucidate the context of their survivorship and inform the design of interventions to ameliorate potentially negative health outcomes. The conceptual framework for this study was derived from Mullen?s ?seasons of survival? and Ferrell et al.?s Quality of Life Model Applied to Cancer Survivors. Methods: This study was descriptive and correlational in nature, using a non-experimental and survey design.&nbsp; A random, stratified, sample of rural LT cancer survivors living in non-metro counties not adjacent to a metro area or with a population of less than 2,500 were contacted through the Colorado Central Cancer Registry database. Regression models were used to examine the relationships between self-esteem, social support, rurality, and HRQL. Results: The sample of ninety eight LT cancer survivors was predominantly retired, Caucasian, breast and prostate cancer survivors in rural. There were no significant relationships between demographic characteristics and HRQL. Unlike previous studies self-esteem had no significant association with HRQL. A second key finding, the consistent association of social support with HRQL, supports previous cancer survivorship research. The third key finding of this study is the consistent influence of rurality on HRQL for LT cancer survivors. Implications for Practice: An understanding of the impact of rurality on social support and HRQL can inform assessment and planning strategies designed to minimize the risk for poor HRQL of rural cancer survivors. The development of nursing interventions to support the HRQL needs of rural long-term cancer survivors must be relevant to the rural setting.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:00:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:00:31Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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