2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157591
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Older Women's Reflections on Accessing Care During and After Cancer
Abstract:
Older Women's Reflections on Accessing Care During and After Cancer
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Pieters, Huibrie C., PhD, RN, PhDc
P.I. Institution Name:University of California, Los Angeles, School of Nursing
Title:Doctoral Candidate
Contact Address:2-137 Factor Bldg, Box 951702, Los Angeles, CA, 90095-1702, USA
Contact Telephone:310-218-8803
Aim: The aim of this study was to describe the experiences of older women (greater than or equal to 70 years of age) related to interactions and communications with the health care system during and after treatment for primary breast cancer. Background: Fifty six percent of all new cancer diagnoses are with people greater than or equal to 65 years (Yancik, 2005) and 61% of all cancer survivors are 65 years and older (Hewitt, Greenfield, & Stovall, 2006). Except for gender, age is the second highest risk factor for breast cancer (Chapman & Moore, 2005). Women of all ages are surviving breast cancer, including those 70 years and above. However, the unique contextual issues of the interface between aging and cancer survivorship, including accessing care, within the context of our aging society are seldom studied (Boyle, 2006; Hewitt et al, 2006; Rowland & Yancik, 2006). Useful information to guide clinical practice is very limited (Crooks, 2001). Methods: Grounded theory methodology informed by feminism guided both data collection and analysis of the many facets of the experiences of women accessing care during and after treatment for primary breast cancer. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with women greater than or equal to 70 years who completed treatment for primary breast cancer within the past 3-15 months. Participants represented diverse cultures, marital statuses, treatments received, and socio-economic strata. Data was analyzed according to constructivist grounded theory principles (Charmaz, 2006). Collaborative analysis was instrumental to enhance rigor, accountability, and depth of analysis. Results: The women told stories of discovery that showed both similarities and differences with the existing literature on younger breast cancer survivors. They identified unique barriers to health care including the ramifications of the ?triple barriers? of age, multiple cancer treatments, and pre-existing co-morbidities. The complex, daily demands generated by the ?triple barriers? resulted in challenges to their efforts to access health care. Nonetheless, these women were remarkably capable to navigate the health care system and access care for, not only a life-threatening disease, but chronic co-morbid problems as well. The significance of the roles of support persons in relation to decision making, accessing care, and adaptation were crucial to women's adaptation. Implications: Understanding the newly recognized phenomenon of cancer survivorship impacts all nurses, not just oncology nurses. In order to provide effective care to all members of society across the lifespan, sensitivity to the unique needs of elders can grow as we listen to the voices of older cancer survivors through research such as this. Awareness of the "triple barriers" can be a catalyst for nurses to enhance access to care and the quality of service delivery for these women who have fought so effectively to overcome a life-threatening disease, in order to move on in their lives.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOlder Women's Reflections on Accessing Care During and After Canceren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157591-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Older Women's Reflections on Accessing Care During and After Cancer</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Pieters, Huibrie C., PhD, RN, PhDc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California, Los Angeles, School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Candidate</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2-137 Factor Bldg, Box 951702, Los Angeles, CA, 90095-1702, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">310-218-8803</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hpieters@ucla.edu, huibrie.pieters@gmail.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Aim: The aim of this study was to describe the experiences of older women (greater than or equal to 70 years of age) related to interactions and communications with the health care system during and after treatment for primary breast cancer. Background: Fifty six percent of all new cancer diagnoses are with people greater than or equal to 65 years (Yancik, 2005) and 61% of all cancer survivors are 65 years and older (Hewitt, Greenfield, &amp; Stovall, 2006). Except for gender, age is the second highest risk factor for breast cancer (Chapman &amp; Moore, 2005). Women of all ages are surviving breast cancer, including those 70 years and above. However, the unique contextual issues of the interface between aging and cancer survivorship, including accessing care, within the context of our aging society are seldom studied (Boyle, 2006; Hewitt et al, 2006; Rowland &amp; Yancik, 2006). Useful information to guide clinical practice is very limited (Crooks, 2001). Methods: Grounded theory methodology informed by feminism guided both data collection and analysis of the many facets of the experiences of women accessing care during and after treatment for primary breast cancer. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with women greater than or equal to 70 years who completed treatment for primary breast cancer within the past 3-15 months. Participants represented diverse cultures, marital statuses, treatments received, and socio-economic strata. Data was analyzed according to constructivist grounded theory principles (Charmaz, 2006). Collaborative analysis was instrumental to enhance rigor, accountability, and depth of analysis. Results: The women told stories of discovery that showed both similarities and differences with the existing literature on younger breast cancer survivors. They identified unique barriers to health care including the ramifications of the ?triple barriers? of age, multiple cancer treatments, and pre-existing co-morbidities. The complex, daily demands generated by the ?triple barriers? resulted in challenges to their efforts to access health care. Nonetheless, these women were remarkably capable to navigate the health care system and access care for, not only a life-threatening disease, but chronic co-morbid problems as well. The significance of the roles of support persons in relation to decision making, accessing care, and adaptation were crucial to women's adaptation. Implications: Understanding the newly recognized phenomenon of cancer survivorship impacts all nurses, not just oncology nurses. In order to provide effective care to all members of society across the lifespan, sensitivity to the unique needs of elders can grow as we listen to the voices of older cancer survivors through research such as this. Awareness of the &quot;triple barriers&quot; can be a catalyst for nurses to enhance access to care and the quality of service delivery for these women who have fought so effectively to overcome a life-threatening disease, in order to move on in their lives.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:00:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:00:54Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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