2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157593
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Collaborating With MN Students in Formative RN-BSN Curriculum Evaluation
Abstract:
Collaborating With MN Students in Formative RN-BSN Curriculum Evaluation
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Plovie, Barbara, ARNP, BC
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington Bothell, Nursing Program
Title:Master of Nursing Student
Contact Address:23129 NE Union Hill Rd, Redmond, WA, 98053, USA
Contact Telephone:425-868-6217
Co-Authors:Jerelyn Resnick, PhD, RN, Lecturer; Linda Westbrook, PhD, RN, Senior Lecturer
Purpose: The goals for a formative evaluation project of the revised RN-BSN curriculum included addressing the following questions: What are the students' and faculty's opinions about the strengths and challenges of the revised curriculum? Can the students report changes in clinical practice that correspond to the program objectives quarter to quarter? Can we demonstrate implementation fidelity? Background/Rationale: To generate data to answer these questions we used a variety of approaches. We solicited information from the faculty themselves (individual presentations and focus groups) and from the RN to BSN students (large group discussions and end of quarter self-evaluations of progress). In addition MN students in the program planning and evaluation course contributed to data generation and analysis. It is our common practice to engage MN students in this core MN course in a "real world" project. To that end, we became clients of a group of MN students who were tasked with assisting us in our project. Approach: We had a menu of items that we presented to the students and through a process of discussion and negotiation we agreed upon a set of "deliverables." They agreed to conduct a quantitative and qualitative analysis of the data from the end of quarter progress report forms completed by the RN-BSN students as well as an evaluation of the data collection process itself. They also agreed to assess implementation fidelity through a review of some of the revised course syllabi. Outcomes: The results from the progress report analysis are descriptive and provocative in terms of the levels of cognition and effective responses reported by our students. The MN student team recommendations for improving the progress reporting process will be implemented this year. Although we chose syllabus examination as representative of the delivered curriculum in the assessment of implementation fidelity, we realize that a more detailed procedure for examining syllabi, along with other data collection methods, would yield more robust information. Implications: Working with the graduate students was a welcome learning experience which helped develop and evaluate our process for working with students studying program planning and evaluation. It helped us see our revised curriculum through new eyes and assess how a collaboration like this can function. Clarity and mutual agreement of outcome expectations and negotiation of project scope is critical to student success. The list of committee needs may exceed student current capabilities and deadlines may challenge students' ability to balance the project with other responsibilities. Terms, criteria, and procedures for data collection and analysis should be clarified and reviewed so all will have confidence in the consistency of the students' results. Close communication between clients and students throughout the process can identify areas where more guidance may be needed and help maintain data quality. The formative evaluation of our revised curriculum will continue throughout this academic year, to be followed by the summative evaluation.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCollaborating With MN Students in Formative RN-BSN Curriculum Evaluationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157593-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Collaborating With MN Students in Formative RN-BSN Curriculum Evaluation</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Plovie, Barbara, ARNP, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington Bothell, Nursing Program</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Master of Nursing Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">23129 NE Union Hill Rd, Redmond, WA, 98053, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">425-868-6217</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bplovie@comcast.net</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jerelyn Resnick, PhD, RN, Lecturer; Linda Westbrook, PhD, RN, Senior Lecturer</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The goals for a formative evaluation project of the revised RN-BSN curriculum included addressing the following questions: What are the students' and faculty's opinions about the strengths and challenges of the revised curriculum? Can the students report changes in clinical practice that correspond to the program objectives quarter to quarter? Can we demonstrate implementation fidelity? Background/Rationale: To generate data to answer these questions we used a variety of approaches. We solicited information from the faculty themselves (individual presentations and focus groups) and from the RN to BSN students (large group discussions and end of quarter self-evaluations of progress). In addition MN students in the program planning and evaluation course contributed to data generation and analysis. It is our common practice to engage MN students in this core MN course in a &quot;real world&quot; project. To that end, we became clients of a group of MN students who were tasked with assisting us in our project. Approach: We had a menu of items that we presented to the students and through a process of discussion and negotiation we agreed upon a set of &quot;deliverables.&quot; They agreed to conduct a quantitative and qualitative analysis of the data from the end of quarter progress report forms completed by the RN-BSN students as well as an evaluation of the data collection process itself. They also agreed to assess implementation fidelity through a review of some of the revised course syllabi. Outcomes: The results from the progress report analysis are descriptive and provocative in terms of the levels of cognition and effective responses reported by our students. The MN student team recommendations for improving the progress reporting process will be implemented this year. Although we chose syllabus examination as representative of the delivered curriculum in the assessment of implementation fidelity, we realize that a more detailed procedure for examining syllabi, along with other data collection methods, would yield more robust information. Implications: Working with the graduate students was a welcome learning experience which helped develop and evaluate our process for working with students studying program planning and evaluation. It helped us see our revised curriculum through new eyes and assess how a collaboration like this can function. Clarity and mutual agreement of outcome expectations and negotiation of project scope is critical to student success. The list of committee needs may exceed student current capabilities and deadlines may challenge students' ability to balance the project with other responsibilities. Terms, criteria, and procedures for data collection and analysis should be clarified and reviewed so all will have confidence in the consistency of the students' results. Close communication between clients and students throughout the process can identify areas where more guidance may be needed and help maintain data quality. The formative evaluation of our revised curriculum will continue throughout this academic year, to be followed by the summative evaluation.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:01:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:01:02Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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