2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157598
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Comparison of Two Nutritional Instruments
Abstract:
Comparison of Two Nutritional Instruments
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Pullen, Julie, MS, MSN, RN, LPC, FNP, GNP, NP-C
P.I. Institution Name:Montana State University, College of Nursing
Title:Adjunct Assistant Professor
Contact Address:MSU Billings Campus Box 574, Billings, MT, 59101, USA
Contact Telephone:406 657-3561
Co-Authors:Karen Zulkowski, DNS, RN, CWS, Associate Professor
Physical, social, and environmental factors contribute to nutritional problems that become more pronounced after the age of 65 years. Inadequate nutritional status is not always readily apparent but is estimated to affect 37-40% of community dwelling elderly. Consequently tools to easily assess nutritional status are needed. In hospitalized elderly, morbidity and mortality have been found to increase even when there are no overt clinical signs of malnutrition. It is estimated that 52-85% of institutionalized elderly, and over 55% of hospitalized elderly, can be considered malnourished. Social concerns also increase an elderly person's risk of poor nutritional status. Elderly who live alone who rely on social security/pensions only or who have difficulty with mobility are at high risk for malnutrition. In several studies of rural residents, 14% reported not having enough money for food on a regular basis and several people said they had crackers and peanut butter at least 1 day a week because that was all they could afford. It was estimated that between 6-16% of respondents have experienced food insecurity.8, 21, 22. However, over or underestimating nutritional risk is problematic. Therefore the purpose of this study is to compare 2 nutritional instruments (Nutritional Screening Initiative [NSI] and Determine Your Nutritional Health) for differences in percentages of seniors determined to be at nutritional risk. Data is presently being collected and will be completed by November 1, 2008. A sample size of 320-400 participants over age 65 years is anticipated. Senior and assisted living centers, hospital volunteer offices, and infusion centers have agreed to be data collection sites. The Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA) and Determine Your Nutritional Health are being compared. Both are widely used nutritional assessment tools. The MNA has 6 screening and 12 assessment questions. The Determine tool has 10 screening questions and includes item explanations. Past research on a small sample showed significant difference in screening estimates. Results of this study will examine the differences between screening instruments and between screening and assessment information. Results will help nurses determine which tool is appropriate for both patient assessment and future research activities.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComparison of Two Nutritional Instrumentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157598-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Comparison of Two Nutritional Instruments</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Pullen, Julie, MS, MSN, RN, LPC, FNP, GNP, NP-C</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Montana State University, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Adjunct Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">MSU Billings Campus Box 574, Billings, MT, 59101, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">406 657-3561</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">julie.pullen@montana.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Karen Zulkowski, DNS, RN, CWS, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Physical, social, and environmental factors contribute to nutritional problems that become more pronounced after the age of 65 years. Inadequate nutritional status is not always readily apparent but is estimated to affect 37-40% of community dwelling elderly. Consequently tools to easily assess nutritional status are needed. In hospitalized elderly, morbidity and mortality have been found to increase even when there are no overt clinical signs of malnutrition. It is estimated that 52-85% of institutionalized elderly, and over 55% of hospitalized elderly, can be considered malnourished. Social concerns also increase an elderly person's risk of poor nutritional status. Elderly who live alone who rely on social security/pensions only or who have difficulty with mobility are at high risk for malnutrition. In several studies of rural residents, 14% reported not having enough money for food on a regular basis and several people said they had crackers and peanut butter at least 1 day a week because that was all they could afford. It was estimated that between 6-16% of respondents have experienced food insecurity.8, 21, 22. However, over or underestimating nutritional risk is problematic. Therefore the purpose of this study is to compare 2 nutritional instruments (Nutritional Screening Initiative [NSI] and Determine Your Nutritional Health) for differences in percentages of seniors determined to be at nutritional risk. Data is presently being collected and will be completed by November 1, 2008. A sample size of 320-400 participants over age 65 years is anticipated. Senior and assisted living centers, hospital volunteer offices, and infusion centers have agreed to be data collection sites. The Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA) and Determine Your Nutritional Health are being compared. Both are widely used nutritional assessment tools. The MNA has 6 screening and 12 assessment questions. The Determine tool has 10 screening questions and includes item explanations. Past research on a small sample showed significant difference in screening estimates. Results of this study will examine the differences between screening instruments and between screening and assessment information. Results will help nurses determine which tool is appropriate for both patient assessment and future research activities.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:01:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:01:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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